RE: [ozmidwifery] nice story....

2006-02-04 Thread Dean Jo
Title: Message



yeah, 
my first thoughts were the same!

  
  -Original Message-From: 
  [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of 
  jesse/jayneSent: Saturday, February 04, 2006 7:56 
  AMTo: ozmidwifery@acegraphics.com.auSubject: Re: 
  [ozmidwifery] nice story
  How about the dad in Melbourne yesterday morning 
  that delivered his baby in the back of the car?! My kids were 
  listening to the news on the radio and my youngest said "WOW!! A MAN HAD 
  A BABY!"
  
  Jayne
  
  
  
- Original Message - 
From: 
Janet 
Fraser 
To: ozmidwifery@acegraphics.com.au 

Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 11:31 
PM
    Subject: Re: [ozmidwifery] nice 
story

I'm glad there was someone 
to "deliver" her baby. Sigh. Don't women give birth?
Cute otherwise ; 
)
J

  - Original Message - 
  From: 
  Steve 
   Janine Clark 
  To: ozmidwifery@acegraphics.com.au 
  
  Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 9:21 
  PM
  Subject: [ozmidwifery] nice 
  story
  
  
  Farm birth nothing to kid 
  aboutCarla Danaher03feb06MANY four-legged kids have been born at 
  Collingwood Children's Farm, but never a two-legged one . . . until 
  now.Brunswick woman Nicole Allard gave birth to Saskia under a peppercorn tree at the farm on Sunday 
  afternoon. 
  A 
  baby goat born at the farm later that day has been named Saskia in her honour. 
  
  Nicole and her partner Julian Elliott, both 
  doctors, were on a family outing with their two children when the 
  36-year-old went into labour. 
  They 
  had been aid workers in Cambodia for the past three years. 
  
  The 
  pair only returned home to Melbourne so they could have their baby in a 
  local hospital, not knowing she would be born at a farm instead. 
  
  But, 
  after trying to walk to her car, Nicole knew she wasn't going to make it 
  to the hospital in time. 
  After 
  farm staff fetched towels and cordoned off the area, Julian delivered his 
  daughter under a peppercorn tree, with their children watching on. 
  
  "It 
  was beautiful to have a child outside," Nicole said. 
  
  "The 
  thing I'm most relieved about is that I delivered there and not one of the 
  other places I was last week, like 
  Federation 
  Square." 
  Mother and baby are doing well, with Saskia a healthy 3.5kg. 
  Collingwood Children's Farm assistant manager 
  Frank Palomares said the happy event came as 
  quite a shock to staff. 
  "Our 
  farmers are trained to deliver animals, but not humans," he said. 
  
  
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  Date: 2/2/2006


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Re: [ozmidwifery] nice story....

2006-02-03 Thread Janet Fraser



I'm glad there was someone to 
"deliver" her baby. Sigh. Don't women give birth?
Cute otherwise ; 
)
J

  - Original Message - 
  From: 
  Steve 
   Janine Clark 
  To: ozmidwifery@acegraphics.com.au 
  
  Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 9:21 
  PM
  Subject: [ozmidwifery] nice 
  story
  
  
  Farm birth nothing to kid 
  aboutCarla Danaher03feb06MANY four-legged kids have been born at Collingwood 
  Children's Farm, but never a two-legged one . . . until 
  now.Brunswick woman Nicole Allard gave birth to Saskia under a peppercorn tree at the farm on Sunday 
  afternoon. 
  A baby 
  goat born at the farm later that day has been named Saskia in her honour. 
  
  Nicole 
  and her partner Julian Elliott, both doctors, were on a family outing with 
  their two children when the 36-year-old went into labour. 
  
  They had 
  been aid workers in Cambodia for the past three years. 
  
  The pair 
  only returned home to Melbourne so they could have their baby in a local 
  hospital, not knowing she would be born at a farm instead. 
  
  But, 
  after trying to walk to her car, Nicole knew she wasn't going to make it to 
  the hospital in time. 
  After 
  farm staff fetched towels and cordoned off the area, Julian delivered his 
  daughter under a peppercorn tree, with their children watching on. 
  
  "It was 
  beautiful to have a child outside," Nicole said. 
  "The 
  thing I'm most relieved about is that I delivered there and not one of the 
  other places I was last week, like 
  Federation 
  Square." 
  Mother 
  and baby are doing well, with Saskia a healthy 
  3.5kg. 
  Collingwood Children's Farm assistant manager Frank 
  Palomares said the happy event came as quite a shock 
  to staff. 
  "Our 
  farmers are trained to deliver animals, but not humans," he said. 
  
  


Re: [ozmidwifery] nice story....

2006-02-03 Thread jesse/jayne



How about the dad in Melbourne yesterday morning 
that delivered his baby in the back of the car?! My kids were 
listening to the news on the radio and my youngest said "WOW!! A MAN HAD A 
BABY!"

Jayne



  - Original Message - 
  From: 
  Janet 
  Fraser 
  To: ozmidwifery@acegraphics.com.au 
  
  Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 11:31 
  PM
  Subject: Re: [ozmidwifery] nice 
  story
  
  I'm glad there was someone 
  to "deliver" her baby. Sigh. Don't women give birth?
  Cute otherwise ; 
  )
  J
  
- Original Message - 
From: 
Steve 
 Janine Clark 
To: ozmidwifery@acegraphics.com.au 

Sent: Friday, February 03, 2006 9:21 
PM
Subject: [ozmidwifery] nice 
story


Farm birth nothing to kid 
aboutCarla Danaher03feb06MANY four-legged kids have been born at Collingwood 
Children's Farm, but never a two-legged one . . . until 
now.Brunswick woman Nicole Allard gave birth to Saskia under a peppercorn tree at the farm on Sunday 
afternoon. 
A baby 
goat born at the farm later that day has been named Saskia in her honour. 

Nicole 
and her partner Julian Elliott, both doctors, were on a family outing with 
their two children when the 36-year-old went into labour. 

They 
had been aid workers in Cambodia for the past three years. 

The 
pair only returned home to Melbourne so they could have their baby in a 
local hospital, not knowing she would be born at a farm instead. 

But, 
after trying to walk to her car, Nicole knew she wasn't going to make it to 
the hospital in time. 
After 
farm staff fetched towels and cordoned off the area, Julian delivered his 
daughter under a peppercorn tree, with their children watching on. 

"It was 
beautiful to have a child outside," Nicole said. 

"The 
thing I'm most relieved about is that I delivered there and not one of the 
other places I was last week, like 
Federation 
Square." 
Mother 
and baby are doing well, with Saskia a healthy 
3.5kg. 
Collingwood Children's Farm assistant manager Frank 
Palomares said the happy event came as quite a 
shock to staff. 
"Our 
farmers are trained to deliver animals, but not humans," he said.