Re: Number display in Firefox

2005-03-28 Thread Ali A. Khanban
I agree with Roozbeh. It also uses Arabic shapes of numbers, which is 
not suitable for Persian texts. But it is good to know about this 
feature, anyway.

Best
-ali-
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
This behavior is of course considered very bad practice, and is not
recommended in any standards. It would also limit one to be able to
display European numbers at all.
So, I would recommend not to turn on the feature, and nag to the
webadmins instead to use Persian digits in their Persian documents.
roozbeh
On Sun, 2005-03-27 at 21:31 +0430, Ehsan Akhgari wrote:
 

Hi all,
I just found something cool in Firefox which I had not come across 
before, and thought some of you guys might not know it as well.  As far 
as I can tell this is related to Gecko, so it must affect all Mozilla 
based applications, though I have not tested it anywhere except Firefox 1.0.

The default rendering behavior for numbers appearing inside Persian text 
in Mozilla is to show them as Latin digits (1 2 3 ...), though in IE it 
depends on the context (whether the direction of the containing text is 
rtl or ltr.)  To make Firefox respect the direction of the text in this 
regard, you can add the following line to your user.js file:

user_pref(bidi.numeral, 1);
which sets the number rendering mode to context.  This enables ASCII 
digits entered inside Persian text to be rendered as Persian numbers ( 
  ...)  Of course this does not affect the behavior of rendering 
numbers explicitly entered using Unicode character codes.

FWIW,
Ehsan
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Re: The New Alef

2005-02-23 Thread Ali A. Khanban

Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
On Wed, 2005-02-23 at 07:57 -0600, Connie Bobroff wrote:
 

Quoting Roozbeh Pournader [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
   

There has been a new Alef around for quite a while. 
 

Why do you say new? Alef is always written out that way as in
numbered lists, 
   

Umm..., because they connect the Alef to the Lam at the top and cut the
Feh short? I have never seen it like that in a numbered list.
 

It just makes it more like one character, and it needs less space, 
especially on the car number plates.

Best
-khanban-
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Behaviour of U+002F in IE and Mozilla

2004-08-12 Thread Ali A. Khanban
Hi,
Since the Arabic thousand separator, U+066B, is not commonly in use, 
most of Persian sites use /, U+002F, instead. The behaviour, when it 
is used between numbers, is different in IE (and MS Office) and Mozilla. 
Which one is the correct one?

Best
-ali-
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Re: Personal names survey

2004-06-18 Thread Ali A. Khanban
Behdad Esfahbod wrote:
The bottom line:  Thanks Connie, you showed us that there are
people printing that thing in reality.  I don't like to argue
about how widely it's used anymore.  If someone has an evidence
of Persian Academy putting this Kasre, please bring the issue up
again for our reconsideration.
As long as I remember, there has been a rule 'no kasre between name 
and family', and there was never anything in favour of kasra in this 
particular case. These examples, thanks to Connie, shows only some 
extreme cases, or typos. I, personally, need to see some linguists in 
favour of using kasre.

Best
-ali-
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Re: Personal names survey

2004-06-17 Thread Ali A. Khanban

C Bobroff wrote:
On Thu, 17 Jun 2004, Ali A. Khanban wrote:
 

http://students.washington.edu/irina/PNMasumehYeM.jpg
 

Only one name comes with ye badal az kasre, which is a bit odd. It
might be a typo in her name or in her ID.
   

Concerning the Hamze Above instead of Kasre, I was just wanting to show
that the -e  (ezaafe) is written as well as spoken.  The ezafe on words
ending with unpronounced Heh (as in Ma`sumeh) is marked  either as
Heh+Hamze Above or Heh+ZWNJ+Yeh and in words ending with pronounced Heh
(as in Roozbeh) is marked with Kasre. Again, in the case of personal
names, the ezaafe is sometimes pronounced and sometimes not pronounced.
This is also sometimes optionally reflected in the writing.
 

Sure. No argument about that. ye badal az kasre is used, as we all 
know, when the first word ends in aa, oo, unpronounced Heh, ... 
BTW, talking about unpronounced Heh, recently I found out that in the 
first year of school, they don't call it like that any more. They call 
it e-ye aakher. Anyway, in a general way, we can consider it a kasre.

I was told to give examples of the ezaafe written in personal names. I
don't think that was supposed to be limited to only when ezaafe is marked
with kasre. I might have misunderstood your comment though!
 

Of course not. It didn't matter if it was Ma'soome-ye ... or Maryam-e 
 In both cases I repeat my argument. But if it wasn't ye badal az 
kasre, I wouldn't call it an ID typo, but just a typo.

Best
-ali-
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Re: Locale requirement of Persian in Iran, first public draft

2004-06-15 Thread Ali A. Khanban
Thanks. BTW, in locale, I noticed that there is no am and pm for 
time, and it is only 24 hour time in Iran. I remember two words 
baamdaam and ba'd az zohr were used by radio/tv presenters most of 
the time. Of course people always use ba'd az zohr, but rarely baamdaad.

I think deleting 12 hour clock is not fair. We could use the current 
entries in AMPM part of the locale in the following link, that you sent me.

Best
-ali-
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
I don't know how you got to the page, but it is about the the Arabic
*language* in Iran. The (almost) correct Persian page is at:
http://oss.software.ibm.com/cgi-bin/icu/lx/en_US/?_=fa_IR
(which is done partially by me.)
roozbeh
On Tue, 2004-06-15 at 05:01, Ali A. Khanban wrote:
 

Hi,
Have a look at:
http://oss.software.ibm.com/cgi-bin/icu/lx/en_US/?_=ard_=en_US_r=IR;
Maybe we need to submit the draft version to correct this. Anyway, as 
long as there is a note, it should be OK to refer to script as Arabic, 
though I still prefer something like Perso-Arabic.

Best
-ali-
C Bobroff wrote:
   

On Mon, 14 Jun 2004, Ali A Khanban wrote:
 

Well, that has the same author(!), so it doesn't count.
  

   

Do a google search for pashto perso-arabic to see that many authors
think Pashto is written in the Perso-Arabic script.
Then do a google search for pashto arabic script and you'll see with
just a quick glance that most further explain that it is *modified* Arabic
script or called *Perso-Arabic.*
If you're writing in English, you'd better not say simply Arabic script.
-Connie
 

 

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|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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Re: Locale requirement of Persian in Iran, first public draft

2004-06-14 Thread Ali A Khanban
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
On Wed, 2004-06-09 at 21:28, Ali A Khanban wrote:
 

Again, I'd like to know if other Arabic-based scripts, such as Pashto 
and Ordu, call themselves Arabic script in their locale.
   

There doesn't exist a standardized locale for Urdu (or any non-standard
one I may know of), but Pashto has one (which I helped prepare and is
approved by their ministry of communication), and calls the script
Arabic.
 

Well, that has the same author(!), so it doesn't count.
-ali-
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|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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Re: Locale requirement of Persian in Iran, first public draft

2004-06-14 Thread Ali A. Khanban
Hi,
Have a look at:
http://oss.software.ibm.com/cgi-bin/icu/lx/en_US/?_=ard_=en_US_r=IR;
Maybe we need to submit the draft version to correct this. Anyway, as 
long as there is a note, it should be OK to refer to script as Arabic, 
though I still prefer something like Perso-Arabic.

Best
-ali-
C Bobroff wrote:
On Mon, 14 Jun 2004, Ali A Khanban wrote:
 

Well, that has the same author(!), so it doesn't count.
   

Do a google search for pashto perso-arabic to see that many authors
think Pashto is written in the Perso-Arabic script.
Then do a google search for pashto arabic script and you'll see with
just a quick glance that most further explain that it is *modified* Arabic
script or called *Perso-Arabic.*
If you're writing in English, you'd better not say simply Arabic script.
-Connie
 

--

||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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Re: khatt e Farsi -- was khaat e Farsi

2004-06-11 Thread Ali A Khanban

C Bobroff wrote:
I believe Roozbeh, while typing the document was attempting to translate
Perso-Arabic script into Persian. Not an easy job.  I recommend for the
final draft, you say khatt-e 'arabi and then in parentheses or footnote,
just put the English (Perso-Arabic script). I don't think that for the
purposes of this draft you need to get into the history of the
calligraphic styles and orthographic conventions.
 

Well, I am afraid that may cause some problems in the future, especially 
some ugly political ones. Let me tell you a story. The first time we 
tried to approach High Council of Informatics showraaye aaliye 
anformaatik to discuss a Unicode proposal, they were against using 
Unicode, just because the letters were named Arabic letter  They 
were of course mistaken, and it took a long time and effort to achieve 
their support. I am sure Roozbeh still remembers those times.

Now, first of all, we do not talk about script family. Everyone agrees 
that Persian script belongs to the Arabic scripts family. We just say 
Persian script, and in a note we explain that this script belongs to 
the Arabic scripts family. Please note that unlike western scripts that 
can be called Latin script, there are many national and political 
barriers and dilemmas, which prevent the nations on this side of the 
world to call their script Arabic script. Choosing a very liberal, and 
somehow radical, approach at the moment doesn't solve all of them!

Secondly, as I mentioned before, we clearly have in the constitution 
that the name of both language and script are Farsi. If we provide a 
document that will become official and in which refer to our script as 
Arabic (no matter how we explain it in a note), that surely will have 
some side-effects.

Best
-ali-
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|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
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Re: Locale requirement of Persian in Iran, first public draft

2004-06-09 Thread Ali A Khanban
Hi,
Behdad Esfahbod wrote:
Well, it depends on your point of view.  Instead of bringing the
Pashto or Ordu case, lets have a look at the western equivalent.
They all call it Latin Script (khatte laatin), right?  It's not
about language or font-style.  And in computer software that's
what really matters.
 

I brought up Pashto and Ordu cases, because they are more relevant to 
our alphabet.

Moreover from another point of view--the Unicode standard--we are
using the Arabic script, there's no such thing as Persian script
encoded in the Unicode standard.
 

Again, I'd like to know if other Arabic-based scripts, such as Pashto 
and Ordu, call themselves Arabic script in their locale. If it is 
common among all these scripts to call themselves Arabic (the case for 
Latin-based scripts), then we should do that, too. Otherwise, we should 
call it Persian Script and add some information (Arabic-based nature 
of the script and so on) in a note.

Best
-ali-
On Wed, 9 Jun 2004, Ali A Khanban wrote:
 

Hi,
The name of the script, as in attachment, seems wrong. According to the
constitution, the name of the language and script is Farsi (Persian).
Look at
http://www.iranonline.com/iran/iran-info/Government/constitution-2.html and
http://www.moi.gov.ir/ghavanin/asasi.htm#three
I know that Persian script comes from Arabic and many may know it as
Arabic, but are all the scripts with their root in Arabic script called
Arabic? For example Pashto or Ordu?
Best
-ali-
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
   

I am glad to announce the availability of the first public draft of the
specification of locale requirements of Persian for Iran. The text tries
to specify the general requirements of internationalized software for
the Persian language of Iran. It's available from:
 http://www.farsiweb.info/locale/locale-0.6.pdf
Please note that this is a draft, and needs your comments in order to
get improved and corrected. FarsiWeb's plan is to keep this a living and
maintained document. For feedback or comments, please email us at
[EMAIL PROTECTED], or call us at +98 21 602-2372. You can also write
to us at the following address:
 Sharif FarsiWeb, Inc.
 PO Box 13445-389
 Tehran, Iran
Also, please note that the documentation is published under a free
documentation license. For the exact details, see the text of the
license (and contact us or your lawyer in case of ambiguities, we are
able to explain the license or relicense the text in certain
conditions), but I wish to mention in short that the text is
copyrighted, and free documentation doesn't mean that you are allowed to
do anything you like with the text. You are allowed to use the
information you learn for any purpose of course, including using them in
proprietary software.
The project has been funded and supported by the High Council of
Informatics of Iran, and the Computing Center of Sharif University of
Technology. We also wish to thank the Persian Linux project for helping
in the funding.
I wish to thank Hamed Malek, Behnam Esfahbod, Houman Mehr, Elnaz Sarbar,
Behdad Esfahbod, Meelad Zakaria, Mehran Mehr, and the PersianComputing
community for their advice and contributions to the work. But as the
main contributor, every fault should only be blamed on me.
Roozbeh Pournader
Sharif FarsiWeb, Inc.
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--behdad
 behdad.org
 

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||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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Re: khaat e Farsi

2004-06-09 Thread Ali A Khanban
Well, it shows that there exists something which is called xatte 
Faarsi. Not everything in our constitution is fiction, is it? ;)

-ali-
Peyman wrote:
The attached .jpg is a text from the book pishineye zabane farsi 
written by Dr. Safavi.
 
Peyman

*/Behdad Esfahbod [EMAIL PROTECTED]/* wrote:
Hi all,
Well, it depends on your point of view. Instead of bringing the
Pashto or Ordu case, lets have a look at the western equivalent.
They all call it Latin Script (khatte laatin), right? It's not
about language or font-style. And in computer software that's
what really matters.
Moreover from another point of view--the Unicode standard--we are
using the Arabic script, there's no such thing as Persian script
encoded in the Unicode standard.
behdad
On Wed, 9 Jun 2004, Ali A Khanban wrote:
 Hi,

 The name of the script, as in attachment, seems wrong. According
to the
 constitution, the name of the language and script is Farsi
(Persian).
 Look at

http://www.iranonline.com/iran/iran-info/Government/constitution-2.html
and
 http://www.moi.gov.ir/ghavanin/asasi.htm#three
 I know that Persian script comes from Arabic and many may know
it as
 Arabic, but are all the scripts with their root in Arabic script
called
 Arabic? For example Pashto or Ordu?

 Best
 -ali-

 Roozbeh Pournader wrote:

 I am glad to announce the availability of the first public
draft of the
 specification of locale requirements of Persian for Iran. The
text tries
 to specify the general requirements of internationalized
software for
 the Persian language of Iran. It's available from:
 
  http://www.farsiweb.info/locale/locale-0.6.pdf
 
 Please note that this is a draft, and needs your comments in
order to
 get improved and corrected. FarsiWeb's plan is to keep this a
living and
 maintained document. For feedback or comments, please email us at
 , or call us at +98 21 602-2372. You! can also write
 to us at the following address:
 
  Sharif FarsiWeb, Inc.
  PO Box 13445-389
  Tehran, Iran
 
 Also, please note that the documentation is published under a free
 documentation license. For the exact details, see the text of the
 license (and contact us or your lawyer in case of ambiguities,
we are
 able to explain the license or relicense the text in certain
 conditions), but I wish to mention in short that the text is
 copyrighted, and free documentation doesn't mean that you are
allowed to
 do anything you like with the text. You are allowed to use the
 information you learn for any purpose of course, including
using them in
 proprietary software.
 
 The project has been funded and supported by the High Council of
 Informatics of Iran, and the Computing Center of Sharif
University of
 Technology. We also wish to thank the Persian Linux project for
helping
 in the funding.
 
 I wish to thank Hamed Malek, Behnam Esfahbod, Houman Mehr,
Elnaz Sarbar,
 Behdad Esfahbod, Meelad Zakaria, Mehran Mehr, and the
PersianComputing
 community for their advice and contributions to the work. But
as the
 main contributor, every fault should only be blamed on me.
 
 Roozbeh Pournader
 Sharif FarsiWeb, Inc.
 
 
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--behdad
behdad.org
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Re: Locale requirement of Persian in Iran, first public draft

2004-06-08 Thread Ali A Khanban
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
I am glad to announce the availability of the first public draft of the
specification of locale requirements of Persian for Iran. The text tries
to specify the general requirements of internationalized software for
the Persian language of Iran. It's available from:
  http://www.farsiweb.info/locale/locale-0.6.pdf
 

Th attachment should be a type, I guess.
Please note that this is a draft, and needs your comments in order to
get improved and corrected. FarsiWeb's plan is to keep this a living and
maintained document. For feedback or comments, please email us at
[EMAIL PROTECTED], or call us at +98 21 602-2372. You can also write
to us at the following address:
  Sharif FarsiWeb, Inc.
  PO Box 13445-389
  Tehran, Iran
Does that mean we should send our comments only to the above email and 
not to this list?

Best
-ali-
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|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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choose a relative email subject

2004-06-08 Thread Ali A Khanban
Dear all,
Please choose a subject related to your email. This will help a lot. 
When you raise a new issue inside a thread, you'd better choose a new 
thread, instead of continuing the old one. Consider this example:
In thread Re: Persian-English Dictionary -- Was: Iranian Mac User 
group, which was a  multiple thread already, one raises the issue of 
cursor problem in bidi texts and it goes on under the same thread! This 
new subject is indeed an interesting, but different one. Please let us 
avoid multiple subject threads as much as possible. This helps others 
who search on the web, too.

Best
-ali-
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||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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Re: Iranian Calendar

2004-05-17 Thread Ali A Khanban
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
On Mon, 2004-05-17 at 15:39, Ali A Khanban wrote:
 

Shaahanshaahi calendar was introduced in 1355 and abolished in 1357. 
   

When exactly? I know that not all of 1357 was known as 2537.
 

In Early 1357 it was abolished. Does it really matter? It is only a 
historical interest. The important thing is how to convert it. Because, 
in those two years, many date references were converted to 
Shaahanshaahi calendar. So, we have some dates like Shahrivar-e 2500 
or Mordaad-e 2512 and so on.

Of course, it is possible to find the exact date, for example by looking 
at the archive of Ettela'at or Kayhan newspapers, and see when the 
date in their title changes. Unfortunately, I don't have access to them 
at the moment, maybe later.

Best
-ali-
roozbeh
 

--

||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
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Re: WEFT webpage font embedding--Call for feedback

2004-05-07 Thread Ali A Khanban
Hi,

IE6.0 on Win2K: OK
Mozilla1.7RC1 on Win2K: OK (but the font of Arabic typesetting is very big!)
And I suppose the English translation of Bushaq poem is written in 
Koodak font (not in Tahoma as it says).

Another point is: why is it  instead of  and  instead of ?

Best
-ali-
C Bobroff wrote:

We've had a few discussions about WEFT before in the past but never really
explored it completely.  Therefore, I made this demo page in both
English and Persian and embedded Tahoma, Koodak(by FarsiWeb) and Arabic
Typesetting:
http://students.washington.edu/irina/persianword/weft.htm
Can you please check if Weft has worked? Do you see my fonts correctly?
Is the Yeh (medial form) showing up correctly in all fonts, especially on
Win98? Is the load time any longer than usual? If you have the old, buggy
Tahoma font, is my corrected font showing up instead?  If you have the old
Sinasoft or Borna Koodak, is my FarsiWeb Koodak showing up?
Please report your findings! Be sure to mention which version of Windows
and IE. By the way, you have to uninstall these fonts if you have them,
otherwise, the test is not too helpful :)
As you may know, Weft only works on Windows and IE so don't bother to
check on anything else.  Also please don't look at the source code! I was
in a great hurry and yes, it's a mess.  Anyone who is qualified is welcome
to redo it if too unbearable.  I would appreciate that!
Thanks!
-Connie
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||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
|||  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~khanban

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Re: WEFT webpage font embedding--Call for feedback

2004-05-07 Thread Ali A Khanban
Actually, Mozilla1.7RC1 doesn't show the embedded fonts! It seems using 
Times New Roman instead of missing fonts.

Best
-ali-
C Bobroff wrote:

We've had a few discussions about WEFT before in the past but never really
explored it completely.  Therefore, I made this demo page in both
English and Persian and embedded Tahoma, Koodak(by FarsiWeb) and Arabic
Typesetting:
http://students.washington.edu/irina/persianword/weft.htm
Can you please check if Weft has worked? Do you see my fonts correctly?
Is the Yeh (medial form) showing up correctly in all fonts, especially on
Win98? Is the load time any longer than usual? If you have the old, buggy
Tahoma font, is my corrected font showing up instead?  If you have the old
Sinasoft or Borna Koodak, is my FarsiWeb Koodak showing up?
Please report your findings! Be sure to mention which version of Windows
and IE. By the way, you have to uninstall these fonts if you have them,
otherwise, the test is not too helpful :)
As you may know, Weft only works on Windows and IE so don't bother to
check on anything else.  Also please don't look at the source code! I was
in a great hurry and yes, it's a mess.  Anyone who is qualified is welcome
to redo it if too unbearable.  I would appreciate that!
Thanks!
-Connie
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|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
|||  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~khanban

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Re: English-Persian dictionary on your site

2004-03-05 Thread Ali A. Khanban
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:

On Thu, 2004-03-04 at 16:38, Ali A. Khanban wrote:
 

About 11-12 years ago, there was a dictionary on DOS 
written by someone I don't exactly remember his name. There wasn't any 
copy right involved, as long as I remember. I decoded the data and 
extracted it. That was based on Arianpour. Then I modified data and 
corrected it as much as I could.
   

I don't understand how it had no copyright problem and at the same time
was based on Aryanpour.
 

I don't know about the copy right problem between Arianpour and the 
original software. All I know was that the original software didn't come 
with an EULA or something similar.

-khanban-

--

||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
|||  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~khanban

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Re: English-Persian dictionary on your site

2004-03-05 Thread Ali A. Khanban
Roozbeh Pournader wrote:

On Fri, 2004-03-05 at 16:14, Ali A. Khanban wrote:

on't forget that I had modified the data before using it in the new 
dictionary and there have been some added words, too.
   

That doesn't make the copying legal, unfortunately.
 

I know. I just mentioned this to explain the source of some differences 
between that data and the original Arianpour book.

-khanban-

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||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
|||  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~khanban

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Re: Using of U+066C as a number-separator

2004-01-09 Thread Ali A. Khanban


Behdad Esfahbod wrote:

On Fri, 9 Jan 2004, Ali A. Khanban wrote:

 

Roozbeh Pournader wrote:
   

On Thu, 2004-01-08 at 18:14, AmirBehzad Eslami wrote:

 

But don't you think shape of U+066C is very similar to sign of 'foot'
and 'minute'?
(http://students.washington.edu/irina/persianword/afgDecSep.JPG)
   

Depends on the font. Compare with
http://www.bamdad.org/~roozbeh/thsep.png, for example.
 

I know it is kind of personal preferences, but I was wondering whether a
right-faced comma-shaped character is suitable for the thousand
separator. I read from right to left when I see such glyph. Because
numbers are written and read from left to right, maybe a 180 rotation to
this character makes it more suitable.
   

It's a valid point.  But I prefer it mirrored, not rotated.

behdad
 

Mirrored is even better. It is more similar to the way I usually 
separate them in handwriting. Put the pen on a paper and then move it to 
the top and left, a natural number separator! Don't ask me for 
references, but I have seen many old people who use such a symbol for 
separating the thousands.

Best
-khanban-
--

||   Ali Asghar Khanban
|| ||Research Associate in Department of Computing
|||  Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ, U.K.
||   Tel: +44 (020) 7594 8241 Fax: +1 (509) 694 0599
|||  [EMAIL PROTECTED]   http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~khanban

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