Re: [pestlist] Suggestions re solutions for termite infestation in the tropics

2017-11-07 Thread Alex Roach

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Hi Hazra
It's a bit hard to say with mould. Some mould attacks can spread very
quickly, but it depends on the conditions (i.e. heat and rh), the material
being stored, the mould type and how much mould is present.
Given the urgency of your problem freezing is a good way to go, but maybe
you could use barrier bags (the ones we use for low oxygen work) instead of
PE for freezing? The benefits are the conditions inside the bag won't
fluctuate like they can in PE bags and the barrier properties prevent most
pests from finding the bagged items (e.g. silverfish). Barrier bags come in
a range of pre-fab sizes - check with Jerry Shiner at Keepsafe for sizes,
etc.
If the storage area is high in humidity then you might want to consider
placing a desiccant or buffer in the bags before you seal them?
Best wishes
Alex


On Wed, 8 Nov 2017 at 9:24 am, Hazra Medica  wrote:

> This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
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> ---
>
> Hi Alex,
>
>
> Thank you so much for taking the time out to respond to my questions.
> I've indeed been thinking freezing might be my best option.  I do have
> another question given your mention of the risk of  mould. How long is it
> safe to have these items bagged/wrapped tightly in plastic before we
> subject them to freezing?  I am trying my best to move rather quickly with
> this project but sometimes things go slow.
>
>
> Best regards.
>
>
> Hazra Medica
>
> *Advisor/Consultant on Cultural Matters*
>
>
> *Ministry of Trade, Industry, Commerce & Consumer Affairs Ministry of
> Sports, Culture & National Festivals St. John's, Antigua W.I.*
>
>
>
> --
> *From:* pestlist-ow...@museumpests.net 
> on behalf of Alex Roach 
> *Sent:* Monday, 06 November 2017 20:31:30
> *To:* pestlist@museumpests.net
>
> *Subject:* Re: [pestlist] Suggestions re solutions for termite
> infestation in the tropics
> This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
> To post to this list send it as an email to pestlist@museumpests.net
> To unsubscribe look at the footer of this email.
> ---
> Hi Hazra
> Bagging infested/suspect materials and freezing will be a great approach
> for treatment of the items.
> Storing the (treated) materials up off the floor post freezing (i.e. on
> blocks or tables) will enable you to keep an eye out for further termite
> attack.
> If you're dealing with drywood termites then even small wooden items can
> contain colonies, but again freezing would be a suitable approach (assuming
> items won't be damaged by freezing).
> You could go down the low oxygen path for treatment, but it's much more
> expensive. One large bag could be used to treat the entire collection, or
> you could make several smaller bags. The small bag approach provides you
> with a stable storage environment for the collection while you work through
> cataloging, etc. Another major advantage is that you won't be facing a
> mould problem when it comes time to open the bags (a real risk when leaving
> items bagged in pe in poor conditions).
> As for treatment of the termite infestation (if you're looking at staying
> in the same building) it will depend upon the species of termite that is
> attacking, building type and other factors. Assuming that they're
> subterranean termites then baiting may be suitable as it will allow you to
> destroy the colony, but you may also be able to locate and destroy the nest
> directly.
> Best wishes
> Alex
>
> On Tue, 7 Nov 2017 at 2:11 am, Hazra Medica 
> wrote:
>
> This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
> To post to this list send it as an email to pestlist@museumpests.net
> To unsubscribe look at the footer of this email.
> ---
>
> Thank you so much for that note, Joel.  Admittedly, my main goal right now
> is  attempting to ensure that we're left with something to preserve until I
> get the "go ahead" to have the items removed and the suitable expert
> brought in to safeguard this very valuable collection.
>
>
> *Hazra C. Medica*
>
>
>
> *Advisor/Consultant on Cultural Matters Ministry of Trade, Industry,
> Commerce & Consumer Affairs Ministry of Sports, Culture & National
> Festivals St. John's,  Antigua W.I.*
>
>
>
> --
> *From:* Voron, Joel 
> *Sent:* Monday, 06 November 2017 10:20:56
> *To:* Hazra Medica
> *Cc:* pestlist@museumpests.net
> *Subject:* Re: [pestlist] 

Re: [pestlist] Another termite question

2017-11-07 Thread Thomas Parker

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Ozge -

Without even finishing my reading of your email, I knew this had to be Los 
Angeles. I’ve dealt with other situations where Drywood termites are in the 
major beams of a large commercial warehouse buildings in the LA area. Seems a 
lot of the warehouses have a similar condition. You are welcomed to call me at 
610-
348-9890, my cell phone, to discuss the situation.

Tom Parker 
610-348-9890 Cellar 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 7, 2017, at 2:20 PM, Ozge Gencay-Ustun  
> wrote:
> 
> This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
> To post to this list send it as an email to pestlist@museumpests.net
> To unsubscribe look at the footer of this email.
> ---
> Dear All,
> 
> I have an inquiry about termites, too. We have drywood termites infested in 
> the wooden beams (vertical beams and roof elements) of our new building, 
> where we have moved our library and where our conservation lab and 
> collections areas are (so from time to time we will have objects in those 
> areas). Our other museum collections (mainly ethnographic) are in other part 
> of the building where there is no wooden structure there, so I might say they 
> are fairly safe, right now.
> 
> In addition, one of our conservators suspects that we may also have 
> subterranean termites. We had a company came in and did a treatment (I am not 
> sure what). It is an old building, we had renovations done and just moved in. 
> We have a small Native garden next to the building, but I didn’t see any 
> subterranean termite tunnels there. I  only saw the drywood termites 
> (red-bodied swarmers with wings of branchy veins). I found all of them dead 
> on the floor of the library’s cool storage room and one of them was alive 
> caught in an insect trap.
> 
> To eliminate the drywood termites what would is recommended? Would using a 
> bait matrix containing an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron work on 
> drywood termites like it did for subterranean termites with the Statue of 
> Liberty (1998 JAIC (37:3) article by Nan-Yao Su, Jamey D. Thomas, and Rudolf 
> H. Scheffrahn)? Do you think it would work better than injecting those wooden 
> beams? Any thoughts would help.
> 
> Thanks,
> Özge Gençay-Üstün
> Assistant Conservator
>  
> AUTRY MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST
> 4700 Western Heritage Way
> Los Angeles, CA 90027-1462
> Direct: 323.495.4328
> E-mail: ogencay-us...@theautry.org
>  
> Go West: TheAutry.org
>  
> -
> To unsubscribe from this list send an email to
> imail...@museumpests.net and in the body put:
> "unsubscribe pestlist"
> Any problems email l...@zaks.com
> 
> 
>  


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[pestlist] Another termite question

2017-11-07 Thread Ozge Gencay-Ustun

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Dear All,

I have an inquiry about termites, too. We have drywood termites infested in the 
wooden beams (vertical beams and roof elements) of our new building, where we 
have moved our library and where our conservation lab and collections areas are 
(so from time to time we will have objects in those areas). Our other museum 
collections (mainly ethnographic) are in other part of the building where there 
is no wooden structure there, so I might say they are fairly safe, right now.

In addition, one of our conservators suspects that we may also have 
subterranean termites. We had a company came in and did a treatment (I am not 
sure what). It is an old building, we had renovations done and just moved in. 
We have a small Native garden next to the building, but I didn't see any 
subterranean termite tunnels there. I  only saw the drywood termites 
(red-bodied swarmers with wings of branchy veins). I found all of them dead on 
the floor of the library's cool storage room and one of them was alive caught 
in an insect trap.

To eliminate the drywood termites what would is recommended? Would using a bait 
matrix containing an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron work on drywood 
termites like it did for subterranean termites with the Statue of Liberty (1998 
JAIC (37:3) article by Nan-Yao Su, Jamey D. Thomas, and Rudolf H. Scheffrahn)? 
Do you think it would work better than injecting those wooden beams? Any 
thoughts would help.

Thanks,
Özge Gençay-Üstün
Assistant Conservator

AUTRY MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST
4700 Western Heritage Way
Los Angeles, CA 90027-1462
Direct: 323.495.4328
E-mail: ogencay-us...@theautry.org

Go West: TheAutry.org



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imail...@museumpests.net and in the body put:
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Re: [pestlist] Suggestions re solutions for termite infestation in the tropics

2017-11-07 Thread Hazra Medica

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Hi Alex,


Thank you so much for taking the time out to respond to my questions.  I've 
indeed been thinking freezing might be my best option.  I do have another 
question given your mention of the risk of  mould. How long is it safe to have 
these items bagged/wrapped tightly in plastic before we subject them to 
freezing?  I am trying my best to move rather quickly with this project but 
sometimes things go slow.


Best regards.


Hazra Medica

Advisor/Consultant on Cultural Matters
Ministry of Trade, Industry, Commerce & Consumer Affairs
Ministry of Sports, Culture & National Festivals
St. John's, Antigua W.I.





From: pestlist-ow...@museumpests.net  on behalf 
of Alex Roach 
Sent: Monday, 06 November 2017 20:31:30
To: pestlist@museumpests.net
Subject: Re: [pestlist] Suggestions re solutions for termite infestation in the 
tropics

This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
To post to this list send it as an email to pestlist@museumpests.net
To unsubscribe look at the footer of this email.
---
Hi Hazra
Bagging infested/suspect materials and freezing will be a great approach for 
treatment of the items.
Storing the (treated) materials up off the floor post freezing (i.e. on blocks 
or tables) will enable you to keep an eye out for further termite attack.
If you're dealing with drywood termites then even small wooden items can 
contain colonies, but again freezing would be a suitable approach (assuming 
items won't be damaged by freezing).
You could go down the low oxygen path for treatment, but it's much more 
expensive. One large bag could be used to treat the entire collection, or you 
could make several smaller bags. The small bag approach provides you with a 
stable storage environment for the collection while you work through 
cataloging, etc. Another major advantage is that you won't be facing a mould 
problem when it comes time to open the bags (a real risk when leaving items 
bagged in pe in poor conditions).
As for treatment of the termite infestation (if you're looking at staying in 
the same building) it will depend upon the species of termite that is 
attacking, building type and other factors. Assuming that they're subterranean 
termites then baiting may be suitable as it will allow you to destroy the 
colony, but you may also be able to locate and destroy the nest directly.
Best wishes
Alex

On Tue, 7 Nov 2017 at 2:11 am, Hazra Medica 
> wrote:
This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
To post to this list send it as an email to 
pestlist@museumpests.net
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---

Thank you so much for that note, Joel.  Admittedly, my main goal right now is  
attempting to ensure that we're left with something to preserve until I get the 
"go ahead" to have the items removed and the suitable expert brought in to 
safeguard this very valuable collection.


Hazra C. Medica
Advisor/Consultant on Cultural Matters
Ministry of Trade, Industry, Commerce & Consumer Affairs
Ministry of Sports, Culture & National Festivals
St. John's,  Antigua W.I.





From: Voron, Joel >
Sent: Monday, 06 November 2017 10:20:56
To: Hazra Medica
Cc: pestlist@museumpests.net
Subject: Re: [pestlist] Suggestions re solutions for termite infestation in the 
tropics

Key note . wooden items would need to have a moisture content less than 19% 
in order for bag/isolation to be faster and a total guaranteed success 
depending of the extent and species of the termites. In case other are thinking 
this may work for all situations. JTV






Joel Voron   Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

  Conservation Dept.

 Integrated Pest Management

  Office 757-220-7080

Cell 757-634-1175

  E-Mail jvo...@cwf.org





[X]

On Nov 6, 2017, at 9:06 AM, Hazra Medica 
> wrote:

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To post to this list send it as an email to 
pestlist@museumpests.net
To unsubscribe look at the footer of this email.
---

Hello,


Kindly permit me to intervene into this space to ask for safe, efficient, and 
cost-effective solutions for remedying severe termite infestations of artefacts 
and documentary heritage that are slated to 

[pestlist] another termite questions

2017-11-07 Thread Ozge Gencay-Ustun

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Dear All,

I have an inquiry about termites, too. We have drywood termites infested in the 
wooden beams (vertical beams and roof elements) of our new building, where we 
have moved our library and where our conservation lab and collections areas are 
(so from time to time we will have objects in those areas). Our other museum 
collections (mainly ethnographic) are in other part of the building where there 
is no wooden structure there, so I might say they are fairly safe, right now.

In addition, one of our conservators suspects that we may also have 
subterranean termites. We have a small Native garden next to the building, but 
I didn't see any subterranean termite tunnels there, I only saw the drywood 
termites (red-bodied swarmers with wings of branchy veins). I found all of them 
dead on the floor of the library's cool storage room and one of them was live 
caught in an insect trap.

To eliminate the drywood termites what would be recommended? Would using a bait 
matrix containing an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron work on drywood 
termites as well? Do you think it would work better than injecting those wooden 
beams and soil with termiticide?

Thanks,

Özge Gençay-Üstün
Assistant Conservator

AUTRY MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST
4700 Western Heritage Way
Los Angeles, CA 90027-1462
Direct: 323.495.4328
E-mail: ogencay-us...@theautry.org

Go West: TheAutry.org



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Re: [pestlist] Suggestions re solutions for termite infestation in the tropics

2017-11-07 Thread Voron, Joel

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Key note . wooden items would need to have a moisture content less than 19% 
in order for bag/isolation to be faster and a total guaranteed success 
depending of the extent and species of the termites. In case other are thinking 
this may work for all situations. JTV






Joel Voron   Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

  Conservation Dept.

 Integrated Pest Management

  Office 757-220-7080

Cell 757-634-1175

  E-Mail jvo...@cwf.org





[X]

On Nov 6, 2017, at 9:06 AM, Hazra Medica 
> wrote:

This is a message from the Museumpests.net  List.
To post to this list send it as an email to 
pestlist@museumpests.net
To unsubscribe look at the footer of this email.
---

Hello,


Kindly permit me to intervene into this space to ask for safe, efficient, and 
cost-effective solutions for remedying severe termite infestations of artefacts 
and documentary heritage that are slated to become part of a special museum 
collection.  We have inherited a collection of artefacts and documents, many of 
which show clear signs of termite infestation or damage from said infestation 
and which are currently still being housed in a building suffering severe 
disrepair.  In an effort to curtail the spread of the infestation whilst the 
pieces are still in their unsuitable environment, I have taken to bagging 
(wrapping the wooden sculptures in plastic bags and sealing them with tape. I 
have also isolated documents in bags.  Removal from the premises is understood 
as a necessary step to ensure the rehabilitation of these items.  Also, 
freezing has been suggested as well as anoxia. Any advice you give will be 
greatly appreciated as this is very new territory for us.


Best regards


Hazra C. Medica
Advisor/Consultant on Cultural Matters
Ministry of Trade, Industry, Commerce & Consumer Affairs
Ministry of Sports, Culture & National Festivals
St. John's, Antigua W.I.





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[pestlist] Another termite question

2017-11-07 Thread Ozge Gencay-Ustun

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---



Dear All,

I have an inquiry about termites, too. We have drywood termites infested in the 
wooden beams (vertical beams and roof elements) of our new building, where we 
have moved our library and where our conservation lab and collections areas are 
(so from time to time we will have objects in those areas). Our other museum 
collections (mainly ethnographic) are in other part of the building where there 
is no wooden structure there, so I might say they are fairly safe, right now.

In addition, one of our conservators suspects that we may also have 
subterranean termites. We had a company came in and did a treatment (I am not 
sure what). It is an old building, we had renovations done and just moved in. 
We have a small Native garden next to the building, but I didn't see any 
subterranean termite tunnels there. I  only saw the drywood termites 
(red-bodied swarmers with wings of branchy veins). I found all of them dead on 
the floor of the library's cool storage room and one of them was alive caught 
in an insect trap.

To eliminate the drywood termites what would is recommended? Would using a bait 
matrix containing an insect growth regulator, hexaflumuron work on drywood 
termites like it did for subterranean termites with the Statue of Liberty (1998 
JAIC (37:3) article by Nan-Yao Su, Jamey D. Thomas, and Rudolf H. Scheffrahn)? 
Do you think it would work better than injecting those wooden beams? Any 
thoughts would help.

Thanks,
Özge Gençay-Üstün
Assistant Conservator

AUTRY MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST
4700 Western Heritage Way
Los Angeles, CA 90027-1462
Direct: 323.495.4328
E-mail: ogencay-us...@theautry.org

Go West: TheAutry.org



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imail...@museumpests.net and in the body put:
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