Re: [Rosegarden-user] The future of Linux sure looks bleak...

2012-08-29 Thread Abrolag
On Wed, 29 Aug 2012 09:36:26 -0400
John wildber...@cogeco.ca wrote:

 I still use Linux for the mental challenges it provides me, but for programs 
 that I need for my personal use, I prefer to pay in real money and not by 
 time spent to make programs work.
 I have reached the point in life where I become immune to the accusation of 
 being to lazy to learn how to make programs to work.  I rather prefer to 
 spend my time to smell the roses.
 
 John

Well, I totally disagree with this. My DAW was installed about 4 years ago,
apart from the occasional security update it has remained unchanged. Although,
yes, I occasionally update Rosegarden from SVN and also Yoshimi, neither of
which it particularly difficult.

My office machine was installed even earlier, and the only reason I
re-installed the OS was because I'd tried playing silly buggers with it,
knowing full well the risks. So it was no loss, because it is now running
debian wheezy very happily.

-- 
Will J Godfrey
http://www.musically.me.uk
Say you have a poem and I have a tune.
Exchange them and we can both have a poem, a tune, and a song.

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Re: [Rosegarden-user] The future of Linux sure looks bleak...

2012-08-29 Thread Chris Cannam
On 29 August 2012 14:48, Richard Bown richard.b...@ferventsoftware.com wrote:
 On 29 Aug 2012, at 15:36, John wildber...@cogeco.ca wrote:
 [...]
 I have reached the point in life where I become immune to the accusation of 
 being to lazy to learn how to make programs to work.  I rather prefer to 
 spend my time to smell the roses.

 Well said, sir.

I'm not sure there is such a simple dichotomy, though. It has so much
to do with temperament and perspective.

For instance, I'm sure that (of historical Rosegarden developers) you
and Guillaume would agree that your lives have been more pleasant
since you stopped having to apply the principle that it has to be
beaten into shape in order to work in Linux and switched to other
platforms in which you get things done more readily. Revisiting other
operating systems in the light of your experience with Linux, you find
one of them more satisfying and switch -- contentedly, I assume.

On the other hand I've had similar experience of other platforms and
found that, in comparison, Linux is the one I most enjoy using, for
many largely subjective reasons. So the same experience has made me
more content as well, but in a different way.

As another example -- John wrote, likely accurately,

 A number of writer to this thread made reference to their recently discovered 
 new distro [...] The next update will bring them back to reality.

But another way of looking at the ebb-and-flow is that, provided the
basics of the OS remain the things you always liked about it, you can
mostly just ignore the passing fads -- so long as you can stick with
the configuration you like and adapt away configurations you don't get
on with, the platform will always come back to you eventually.

I think the root of Michael's problem is that he feels stuck with this
one operating system -- whether for financial reasons or because of a
gloomy expectation that nothing else is going to work for him either.
So he hasn't had the opportunity either to decide to let it go, or to
relish the good things about it.


Chris

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Re: [Rosegarden-user] The future of Linux sure looks bleak...

2012-08-29 Thread Richard Bown
On 29 Aug 2012, at 23:14, Chris Cannam can...@all-day-breakfast.com wrote:

 So he hasn't had the opportunity either to decide to let it go, or to
 relish the good things about it.

It's a fucking operating system.  Get over it.

R

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Re: [Rosegarden-user] The future of Linux sure looks bleak...

2012-08-29 Thread jimmy


--- On Wed, 8/29/12, John wildber...@cogeco.ca wrote:

 I still use Linux for the mental challenges it provides me,
 but for programs that I need for my personal use, I prefer
 to pay in real money and not by time spent to make programs
 work.


Perhaps you shouldn't even bother with Linux at all, pay for Windows, or OSX 
apps for everything you want to use, Rosegarden, Lilypond probably can't be 
compare to the well polished professional apps out there.



 I have reached the point in life where I become immune to
 the accusation of being to lazy to learn how to make
 programs to work.  I rather prefer to spend my time to
 smell the roses.
 
 John

Sure people can chose what they want do to.  There are plenty of people who 
couldn't and wouldn't learn how to program the clock on a Microwave, or VCR.  
No big deals.

Jimmy





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Re: [Rosegarden-user] The future of Linux sure looks bleak...

2012-08-29 Thread jimmy


--- On Wed, 8/29/12, John wildber...@cogeco.ca wrote:

 A number of writer to this thread made reference to their
 recently discovered new distro (whatever !) that is not
 suffering from any of the known illnesses. I can assure them
 that they are living in a dream world. The next update will
 bring them back to reality.

Stick with a commonly used distro, and learn how to use it properly.  Distro 
hopping are like fashion followers, there are always new hats, new ties, new 
eye glasses, new dresses, new shoes, new cell phones...

But of course, for newbies who haven't chosen a Linux distro yet, some 
recommendations are not such a bad idea, either, especially the newbies in the 
Linux MIDI arena.

My use of Linux and Open Source apps are because I simply don't want to agree 
to draconian terms of the EULA (End User's License Agreements), and having to 
jump through all the hoops to back up and restore my computer, and associated 
applications.

I want to install, copy, backup my OS and softwares on to different computers 
of my choice, when I do my hardware upgrades.  Or having a working spare 
system in place, so when my main computer has a problem, I can fairly quickly 
get my work done without interruption.  And I don't want to pay double, triple, 
quadruple the licensing fees, just because I have a few some older computers 
sitting around.  Some people don't even bother to read EULA, nor care to 
understand those legal terms, but most of them don't even allow the OS, or 
applications to be copied on to a running (operarting) computer so that such 
softwares can be readily run.

Worse than that, many proprietary applications have their own data format.  
Years down the road, when I need to read such data files, those apps may not be 
installable, or runnable on my latest computer(s), and the older computers or 
hard drives may have died long before that.

With most Open Source softwares, the data file format can be read and data be 
extracted or converted much more readily.

Jimmy



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