Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Brian Cook


My solution for this is not elegant.  I run 8 apps on one instance of 
Tomcat and it will be growing to 12 soon.  All of those apps are set 
with autoReload set to true.  When I need to update something I 
manually copy the individual class or JSP file to the proper folder to 
over write the existing ones. So I never need to take Tomcat down unless 
I update a library in commons/lib which is almost never.  I also when in 
a hurry use the deployer to restart individual web apps so they do not 
all go down.


This works to a point but has the obvious pitfalls.  First Tomcat is 
wasting processing time constantly checking to see if it should reload 
any of the modules.  And second if I update a class file or JSP page 
that depends on another updated class or JSP file I forgot to copy over 
then that app will throw exceptions like crazy.  It also means I have to 
manually set the config files like the context.xml files which is very 
error pron.


Any one else have other ideas?




-Original Message-
From: Seth Ladd [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 3:12 PM

To: Tomcat Users List
Subject: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

Hello,

We are finding outselves hosting more and more individual 
webapps, all 
running on Tomcat 5.5.9 w/ JDK 1.5.  Each of these webapps is 
developed 
and deployed on a separate schedule, and the number and 
frequency of app 
deployments is increasing.


The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our 
applications is 
affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to 
deploy a new application (or new version of the application). 
Because 
hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.


To avoid taking down all of our applications when we need to 
redeploy a 
single app, we've begun to deploy each application to their 
own Tomcat 
instance.  All of these instances are fronted by a single 
Apache server 
handling vhosts, logging, etc.


We're just curious how common this setup really is.  We know 
we are in 
an uncommon position, with so many webapps (approaching 20, 
and growing 
very fast).  We don't want to put all our eggs in one basket, so to 
speak, so we've begun to split out individual tomcat instances.


Anyone else have to handle numerous webapps, with frequent 
deploys, and 
have to keep uptime for all apps as high as possible?  We hesitate to 
put all webapps in one tomcat, because to deploy one app 
means we have 
to take down all of our apps.  This is becoming unacceptable. 
(not to 
mention that a memory leak in one app will bring down all the apps 
living in that tomcat instance)


Any tips or tricks would be really appreciated.  Or pointers 
to previous 
material (I've found some, but nothing that jumped out at me).


Thanks very much in advance,
Seth

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Brian Cook


I think I missed something here.  Are you not still bouncing Tomcat 
here?  If so isnt the service still going down?  What is the benifit of 
changign the ports around?  I have a feeling I missed something in the 
expliation.



George Sexton wrote:

The technique I use is this:

Run the HTTP connector on port 8080.

Forward port 80 to port 8080.

To re-start the system:

edit the server.xml and run the HTTP connector on port 7080
Change the shutdown port to 8006

Start tomcat, and wait till it comes up.

Re-run the firewall script to forward port 80 to port 7080.

Stop the instance running on port 7080.

The downside is that any active sessions get bounced and have to re-login.

George Sexton
MH Software, Inc.
http://www.mhsoftware.com/
Voice: 303 438 9585
  




-Original Message-
From: Seth Ladd [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 3:12 PM

To: Tomcat Users List
Subject: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

Hello,

We are finding outselves hosting more and more individual 
webapps, all 
running on Tomcat 5.5.9 w/ JDK 1.5.  Each of these webapps is 
developed 
and deployed on a separate schedule, and the number and 
frequency of app 
deployments is increasing.


The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our 
applications is 
affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to 
deploy a new application (or new version of the application). 
Because 
hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.


To avoid taking down all of our applications when we need to 
redeploy a 
single app, we've begun to deploy each application to their 
own Tomcat 
instance.  All of these instances are fronted by a single 
Apache server 
handling vhosts, logging, etc.


We're just curious how common this setup really is.  We know 
we are in 
an uncommon position, with so many webapps (approaching 20, 
and growing 
very fast).  We don't want to put all our eggs in one basket, so to 
speak, so we've begun to split out individual tomcat instances.


Anyone else have to handle numerous webapps, with frequent 
deploys, and 
have to keep uptime for all apps as high as possible?  We hesitate to 
put all webapps in one tomcat, because to deploy one app 
means we have 
to take down all of our apps.  This is becoming unacceptable. 
(not to 
mention that a memory leak in one app will bring down all the apps 
living in that tomcat instance)


Any tips or tricks would be really appreciated.  Or pointers 
to previous 
material (I've found some, but nothing that jumped out at me).


Thanks very much in advance,
Seth

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Brian Cook
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Print Time Inc.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
913.345.8900

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Mikolaj Rydzewski

Seth Ladd wrote:

The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our applications is 
affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to 
deploy a new application (or new version of the application).  Because 
hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.


What about clustering? You could move users to one node of the cluster, 
update apps in the second one, and then the opposite. Move users to the 
second node, update the first one and finally allow users to work with 
two (or more) nodes.


--
Mikolaj Rydzewski  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Becomo S.A.
tel. (12) 2927104




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Description: S/MIME Cryptographic Signature


RE: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Allistair Crossley
we used to just schedule updates and let all our staff know there would be a 
small amount of downtime (for our intranet) but you can't do this on external 
production servers, so you need to go with either load balancing/clustering 
that allows you to close a node down *while also* letting sessions complete 
(e.g BigIP I think may do this). we have a semi-solution using mod_jk's load 
balancing/sticky sessions. Although closing a node does not wait until sessions 
are complete, mod_jk still detects the failed node and passes over to the next 
node gracefully. it's a 1/2 way house to a full solution that you can implement 
right away. for graceful close down (i.e sessions completing) you need 
something like BigIP or a commercial application server like BEA which does 
this for you. I really wish support for hot deployment got sorted out in 
Tomcat/J2EE servers in general. Although I am a J2EE die-hard I used C# .NET 
recently for a project and it beats the hell out of J2EE deployment, if we're 
not careful this will be a big win for .NET.

 -Original Message-
 From: Brian Cook [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Sent: 18 August 2005 15:55
 To: Tomcat Users List
 Subject: Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?
 
 
 
 I think I missed something here.  Are you not still bouncing Tomcat 
 here?  If so isnt the service still going down?  What is the 
 benifit of 
 changign the ports around?  I have a feeling I missed 
 something in the 
 expliation.
 
 
 George Sexton wrote:
  The technique I use is this:
  
  Run the HTTP connector on port 8080.
  
  Forward port 80 to port 8080.
  
  To re-start the system:
  
  edit the server.xml and run the HTTP connector on port 7080
  Change the shutdown port to 8006
  
  Start tomcat, and wait till it comes up.
  
  Re-run the firewall script to forward port 80 to port 7080.
  
  Stop the instance running on port 7080.
  
  The downside is that any active sessions get bounced and 
 have to re-login.
  
  George Sexton
  MH Software, Inc.
  http://www.mhsoftware.com/
  Voice: 303 438 9585

  
  
 -Original Message-
 From: Seth Ladd [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
 Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 3:12 PM
 To: Tomcat Users List
 Subject: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?
 
 Hello,
 
 We are finding outselves hosting more and more individual 
 webapps, all 
 running on Tomcat 5.5.9 w/ JDK 1.5.  Each of these webapps is 
 developed 
 and deployed on a separate schedule, and the number and 
 frequency of app 
 deployments is increasing.
 
 The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our 
 applications is 
 affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in 
 production to 
 deploy a new application (or new version of the application). 
  Because 
 hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
 redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.
 
 To avoid taking down all of our applications when we need to 
 redeploy a 
 single app, we've begun to deploy each application to their 
 own Tomcat 
 instance.  All of these instances are fronted by a single 
 Apache server 
 handling vhosts, logging, etc.
 
 We're just curious how common this setup really is.  We know 
 we are in 
 an uncommon position, with so many webapps (approaching 20, 
 and growing 
 very fast).  We don't want to put all our eggs in one basket, so to 
 speak, so we've begun to split out individual tomcat instances.
 
 Anyone else have to handle numerous webapps, with frequent 
 deploys, and 
 have to keep uptime for all apps as high as possible?  We 
 hesitate to 
 put all webapps in one tomcat, because to deploy one app 
 means we have 
 to take down all of our apps.  This is becoming unacceptable. 
  (not to 
 mention that a memory leak in one app will bring down all the apps 
 living in that tomcat instance)
 
 Any tips or tricks would be really appreciated.  Or pointers 
 to previous 
 material (I've found some, but nothing that jumped out at me).
 
 Thanks very much in advance,
 Seth
 
 
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 Brian Cook
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 Print Time Inc.
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 913.345.8900
 
 


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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread George L. Sexton
The net effect is that users have to re-login, but there is no down time. They 
get bounced, but can immediately log back in.

Right now, startup time for my hosted machine is running in the area of 5 
minutes. So, I'm eliminating a 5 minute startup cycle.

I'm running 60 virtual hosts on one machine (P3 600). I'll be moving to a P4 
3.0GHz this weekend, but I hope to get up to 200 virtual hosts per machine.

Any way you cut it, startup time is a killer. 

On Thursday 18 August 2005 08:54, Brian Cook wrote:

 I think I missed something here.  Are you not still bouncing Tomcat
 here?  If so isnt the service still going down?  What is the benifit of
 changign the ports around?  I have a feeling I missed something in the
 expliation.

 George Sexton wrote:
  The technique I use is this:

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Brian Cook


Sorry still not following.  If Tomcat is being restarted how do you not 
have start up time?  Is it that you have two instances of Tocmat and you 
are having the firewall just point to one instance while you bounce the 
second?


If so is there an advantage to doing that over clustering?


George L. Sexton wrote:
The net effect is that users have to re-login, but there is no down time. They 
get bounced, but can immediately log back in.


Right now, startup time for my hosted machine is running in the area of 5 
minutes. So, I'm eliminating a 5 minute startup cycle.


I'm running 60 virtual hosts on one machine (P3 600). I'll be moving to a P4 
3.0GHz this weekend, but I hope to get up to 200 virtual hosts per machine.


Any way you cut it, startup time is a killer. 


On Thursday 18 August 2005 08:54, Brian Cook wrote:



I think I missed something here.  Are you not still bouncing Tomcat
here?  If so isnt the service still going down?  What is the benifit of
changign the ports around?  I have a feeling I missed something in the
expliation.

George Sexton wrote:


The technique I use is this:



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Brian Cook
Digital Services Analyst
Print Time Inc.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
913.345.8900

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Seth Ladd

Mikolaj Rydzewski wrote:

Seth Ladd wrote:

The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our applications is 
affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to 
deploy a new application (or new version of the application).  Because 
hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.



What about clustering? You could move users to one node of the cluster, 
update apps in the second one, and then the opposite. Move users to the 
second node, update the first one and finally allow users to work with 
two (or more) nodes.




Yes, but then how to do you handle class evolution for objects in the 
session?


For example, if I'm clustering two Tomcats, they are sharing Session 
state.  If I upgrade one node in the cluster, and possibly change a 
class definition of an object that gets stored in the session, I will 
now have two definitions of the same object (one for the old cluster 
node and one for the new cluster node).  I think there will be 
serialVersionUID issues there.


Advice on how to handle that?

Thanks!
Seth


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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Seth Ladd

Allistair Crossley wrote:

we used to just schedule updates and let all our staff know there would be a 
small amount of downtime (for our intranet) but you can't do this on external 
production servers, so you need to go with either load balancing/clustering 
that allows you to close a node down *while also* letting sessions complete 
(e.g BigIP I think may do this). we have a semi-solution using mod_jk's load 
balancing/sticky sessions. Although closing a node does not wait until sessions 
are complete, mod_jk still detects the failed node and passes over to the next 
node gracefully. it's a 1/2 way house to a full solution that you can implement 
right away. for graceful close down (i.e sessions completing) you need 
something like BigIP or a commercial application server like BEA which does 
this for you. I really wish support for hot deployment got sorted out in 
Tomcat/J2EE servers in general. Although I am a J2EE die-hard I used C# .NET 
recently for a project and it beats the hell out of J2EE deployment

, if we're not careful this will be a big win for .NET.


The hot deployment issues isn't a Tomcat issue, or a J2EE issue.  It's a 
fundamental flaw in the JVM.  There is just no way to explicitly destroy 
a classloader (the main cause of OOM exceptions when constantly 
redeploying apps).  Until either we're able to just destroy a 
classloader, or have isolates/MVM available, we're stuck in this 
deployment mess.


I agree, .NET is way better for developing and deploying apps.  And 
deployment couldn't get more simple that PHP (just copy them over).  Why 
does it have to be so hard for Java?


Until Sun wakes up and realizes the JVM wasn't made to host multiple 
applications, and then fixes it, we're going to be stuck with the 
current state of things.  For instance, having to run each webapp in a 
separate Tomcat just to minimize downtime for all apps is pretty crazy.


The clustering solution seems possible, except I'm worried about two 
different versions of a class ending up in the session (and this causing 
serialVersionUID issues).


Seth

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Asad Habib
.NET and PHP may have better development/deployment environments, but
quite frankly I would rather use Java than C# or PHP to develop web
applications. Just look at the robust Java open-source frameworks that
exist (i.e. Spring, Turbine, Struts, JSF) just to name a few. Also, .NET
applications are not multi-platform. There is just no comparison to Java
- J2EE rules!

- Asad



On Thu, 18 Aug 2005, Seth Ladd wrote:

 Allistair Crossley wrote:
  we used to just schedule updates and let all our staff know there would be 
  a small amount of downtime (for our intranet) but you can't do this on 
  external production servers, so you need to go with either load 
  balancing/clustering that allows you to close a node down *while also* 
  letting sessions complete (e.g BigIP I think may do this). we have a 
  semi-solution using mod_jk's load balancing/sticky sessions. Although 
  closing a node does not wait until sessions are complete, mod_jk still 
  detects the failed node and passes over to the next node gracefully. it's a 
  1/2 way house to a full solution that you can implement right away. for 
  graceful close down (i.e sessions completing) you need something like BigIP 
  or a commercial application server like BEA which does this for you. I 
  really wish support for hot deployment got sorted out in Tomcat/J2EE 
  servers in general. Although I am a J2EE die-hard I used C# .NET recently 
  for a project and it beats the hell out of J2EE deployme!
 nt
 , if we're not careful this will be a big win for .NET.


 The hot deployment issues isn't a Tomcat issue, or a J2EE issue.  It's a
 fundamental flaw in the JVM.  There is just no way to explicitly destroy
 a classloader (the main cause of OOM exceptions when constantly
 redeploying apps).  Until either we're able to just destroy a
 classloader, or have isolates/MVM available, we're stuck in this
 deployment mess.

 I agree, .NET is way better for developing and deploying apps.  And
 deployment couldn't get more simple that PHP (just copy them over).  Why
 does it have to be so hard for Java?

 Until Sun wakes up and realizes the JVM wasn't made to host multiple
 applications, and then fixes it, we're going to be stuck with the
 current state of things.  For instance, having to run each webapp in a
 separate Tomcat just to minimize downtime for all apps is pretty crazy.

 The clustering solution seems possible, except I'm worried about two
 different versions of a class ending up in the session (and this causing
 serialVersionUID issues).

 Seth

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread George L. Sexton
To re-start tomcat, I start a second instance running on a different port and 
after the second instance is running, change the port forwarding to activate 
it.

 If so is there an advantage to doing that over clustering?

It's a simple configuration that only requires one machine.

As nice as clustering sounds, it's not as useful as people think. Two areas 
where clustering won't work:

Application upgrade that requires database structure change.

Application upgrade that mades the serialized version of the properties 
incompatible from one version to the next.

Another problem for me with clustering is that it seems to require an external 
director that would balance the requests across the host. If this is mod_jk 
and Apache, that's pretty ungainly if you are running a hosting operation 
with 200 virtual hosts.

If it's an external load balance, that's a third piece of hardware.

On Thursday 18 August 2005 10:15, Brian Cook wrote:
 Sorry still not following.  If Tomcat is being restarted how do you not
 have start up time?  Is it that you have two instances of Tocmat and you
 are having the firewall just point to one instance while you bounce the
 second?

 If so is there an advantage to doing that over clustering?

 George L. Sexton wrote:
  The net effect is that users have to re-login, but there is no down time.
  They get bounced, but can immediately log back in.
 
  Right now, startup time for my hosted machine is running in the area of 5
  minutes. So, I'm eliminating a 5 minute startup cycle.
 
  I'm running 60 virtual hosts on one machine (P3 600). I'll be moving to a
  P4 3.0GHz this weekend, but I hope to get up to 200 virtual hosts per
  machine.
 
  Any way you cut it, startup time is a killer.
 
  On Thursday 18 August 2005 08:54, Brian Cook wrote:
 I think I missed something here.  Are you not still bouncing Tomcat
 here?  If so isnt the service still going down?  What is the benifit of
 changign the ports around?  I have a feeling I missed something in the
 expliation.
 
 George Sexton wrote:
 The technique I use is this:
 
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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-18 Thread Seth Ladd

Asad Habib wrote:

.NET and PHP may have better development/deployment environments, but
quite frankly I would rather use Java than C# or PHP to develop web
applications. Just look at the robust Java open-source frameworks that
exist (i.e. Spring, Turbine, Struts, JSF) just to name a few. Also, .NET
applications are not multi-platform. There is just no comparison to Java
- J2EE rules!


No doubt, and this isn't about which rules more.  This is a frank 
discussion regarding issues of hosting many webapps, looking for a real 
solution.


I was merely trying to illustrate how high the bar has been set, and 
Java should aspire to be as easy /to deploy/ as PHP.  It's certainly 
more powerful.


Seth

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Re: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-17 Thread Radek Wierzbicki
Hi,

I very often deploy client's applications in multiple tomcat instances.
It is normal and each application does not affect another. You just need
a strong multiprocessor server with a lot of memory to sustain the last
:) The only difference is that I often configure a separate apache
instance for each tomcat instance. But one apache is also fine.

I find this setup very comfortable when it comes to updating the
application code or just restarting an application. Also, when one
tomcat crashes, others run just fine.

A tip here is to write/rewrite startup script so that it handles
multiple instances of tomcat. It is also a good idea to create an
environment profile file for each instance where you define stuff like
JAVA_HOME or JAVA_OPTS for each instance separatelly and store it with
the configuration. The development expense may be unneccessary if you
only have one setup like that.

I hope you are using the $CATALINA_HOME and $CATALINA_BASE variables to
separate binaries from runtime/configuration files of each instance and
you're not copying the whole tomcat tree.

Think about file and process ownerships when web applications belong to
different owners.

If you want to ensure reliability then clone the machine and put a
redirector in front of both. It scales very well and the user impact in
case of trouble is not 100%.

--Radek W.


Seth Ladd wrote:
 Hello,
 
 We are finding outselves hosting more and more individual webapps, all
 running on Tomcat 5.5.9 w/ JDK 1.5.  Each of these webapps is developed
 and deployed on a separate schedule, and the number and frequency of app
 deployments is increasing.
 
 The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our applications is
 affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to
 deploy a new application (or new version of the application).  Because
 hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many
 redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.
 
 To avoid taking down all of our applications when we need to redeploy a
 single app, we've begun to deploy each application to their own Tomcat
 instance.  All of these instances are fronted by a single Apache server
 handling vhosts, logging, etc.
 
 We're just curious how common this setup really is.  We know we are in
 an uncommon position, with so many webapps (approaching 20, and growing
 very fast).  We don't want to put all our eggs in one basket, so to
 speak, so we've begun to split out individual tomcat instances.
 
 Anyone else have to handle numerous webapps, with frequent deploys, and
 have to keep uptime for all apps as high as possible?  We hesitate to
 put all webapps in one tomcat, because to deploy one app means we have
 to take down all of our apps.  This is becoming unacceptable.  (not to
 mention that a memory leak in one app will bring down all the apps
 living in that tomcat instance)
 
 Any tips or tricks would be really appreciated.  Or pointers to previous
 material (I've found some, but nothing that jumped out at me).
 
 Thanks very much in advance,
 Seth
 
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Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-16 Thread Seth Ladd

Hello,

We are finding outselves hosting more and more individual webapps, all 
running on Tomcat 5.5.9 w/ JDK 1.5.  Each of these webapps is developed 
and deployed on a separate schedule, and the number and frequency of app 
deployments is increasing.


The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our applications is 
affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to 
deploy a new application (or new version of the application).  Because 
hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.


To avoid taking down all of our applications when we need to redeploy a 
single app, we've begun to deploy each application to their own Tomcat 
instance.  All of these instances are fronted by a single Apache server 
handling vhosts, logging, etc.


We're just curious how common this setup really is.  We know we are in 
an uncommon position, with so many webapps (approaching 20, and growing 
very fast).  We don't want to put all our eggs in one basket, so to 
speak, so we've begun to split out individual tomcat instances.


Anyone else have to handle numerous webapps, with frequent deploys, and 
have to keep uptime for all apps as high as possible?  We hesitate to 
put all webapps in one tomcat, because to deploy one app means we have 
to take down all of our apps.  This is becoming unacceptable.  (not to 
mention that a memory leak in one app will bring down all the apps 
living in that tomcat instance)


Any tips or tricks would be really appreciated.  Or pointers to previous 
material (I've found some, but nothing that jumped out at me).


Thanks very much in advance,
Seth

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RE: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?

2005-08-16 Thread George Sexton
The technique I use is this:

Run the HTTP connector on port 8080.

Forward port 80 to port 8080.

To re-start the system:

edit the server.xml and run the HTTP connector on port 7080
Change the shutdown port to 8006

Start tomcat, and wait till it comes up.

Re-run the firewall script to forward port 80 to port 7080.

Stop the instance running on port 7080.

The downside is that any active sessions get bounced and have to re-login.

George Sexton
MH Software, Inc.
http://www.mhsoftware.com/
Voice: 303 438 9585
  

 -Original Message-
 From: Seth Ladd [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
 Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2005 3:12 PM
 To: Tomcat Users List
 Subject: Advice for Hosting Many Individual Webapps?
 
 Hello,
 
 We are finding outselves hosting more and more individual 
 webapps, all 
 running on Tomcat 5.5.9 w/ JDK 1.5.  Each of these webapps is 
 developed 
 and deployed on a separate schedule, and the number and 
 frequency of app 
 deployments is increasing.
 
 The frequency is so much that the uptime of all of our 
 applications is 
 affected as we continually take down Tomcat servers in production to 
 deploy a new application (or new version of the application). 
  Because 
 hot deploy does not work (the old favorite OOM error w/ too many 
 redeploys), we bounce the Tomcat server for every redeploy.
 
 To avoid taking down all of our applications when we need to 
 redeploy a 
 single app, we've begun to deploy each application to their 
 own Tomcat 
 instance.  All of these instances are fronted by a single 
 Apache server 
 handling vhosts, logging, etc.
 
 We're just curious how common this setup really is.  We know 
 we are in 
 an uncommon position, with so many webapps (approaching 20, 
 and growing 
 very fast).  We don't want to put all our eggs in one basket, so to 
 speak, so we've begun to split out individual tomcat instances.
 
 Anyone else have to handle numerous webapps, with frequent 
 deploys, and 
 have to keep uptime for all apps as high as possible?  We hesitate to 
 put all webapps in one tomcat, because to deploy one app 
 means we have 
 to take down all of our apps.  This is becoming unacceptable. 
  (not to 
 mention that a memory leak in one app will bring down all the apps 
 living in that tomcat instance)
 
 Any tips or tricks would be really appreciated.  Or pointers 
 to previous 
 material (I've found some, but nothing that jumped out at me).
 
 Thanks very much in advance,
 Seth
 
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