[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-20 Thread Vision Jinx

Re: Twitter is not making money

I wasn't going to add to this thread being a developer group and all,
but according to Twitter... (we spend more money than we make)

http://twitter.com/about#money

Q: How do you make money from Twitter?

A: Twitter has many appealing opportunities for generating revenue but
we are holding off on implementation for now because we don't want to
distract ourselves from the more important work at hand which is to
create a compelling service and great user experience for millions of
people around the world. While our business model is in a research
phase, we spend more money than we make.

- About us Twitter is a privately funded startup...

On Jul 18, 1:29 am, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky zzn...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Jul 16, 1:14 pm, Stuart stut...@gmail.com wrote:

  Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
  the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
  premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
  tracking.

 I've got news for you ... Twitter itself is woefully behind the curve
 on monitoring / marketing / analytics technologies. Third parties are
 springing up daily with offerings in this area, many of them involving
 cutting-edge natural language processing. Twitter could obviously
 invest in these areas, but I'm not sure why they would, rather than
 focusing on stability, scalability and security of the underlying
 platform and messaging systems.

 Perhaps one way to monetize Twitter would be to implement a per-
 follower charge, say, free up to 2000 followers, then a small monthly
 fee up to 10,000, a larger fee up to 100,000 and so on. I haven't seen
 follower count distribution data recently, but I'd say that people
 with more than 2000 followers are rare and are probably using Twitter
 as a push marketing / sales platform in some sense. Of course, I'm
 at around 3500 followers at the moment, so I would be paying a monthly
 fee and would need to justify it as a business expense (or block about
 1500 people, which isn't out of the question) ;-)


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-19 Thread Andrew Badera
On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 6:57 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky zzn...@gmail.comwrote:


 On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 12:53 AM, Kevin Mesiabke...@mesiablabs.com
 wrote:
  A per follower charge is a fast way to obliterate the value of Twitter as
 a
  platform.

 I disagree. Businesses are using Twitter to listen to their customers
 and to engage with them. I think a business should be allowed to
 follow as many customers and prospects as they want, totally without
 limits and totally without charge. But I think they should pay for the
 right to appear in thousands of timelines and to send direct messages
 to thousands of people.



The value you describe isn't usually found in direct followers (may as well
call them fans) as it is in random conversations between
less-biased/maniacal persons.

The value of direct followers is direct interaction, which carries with it
various biases and skews. Direct interaction is great for tech support, and
for answering specific questions, but not for assessing consumer intent,
confidence or general attitude.

I think the non-direct conversation mining has a lot greater value for
business.


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-19 Thread Andrew Badera
On Sun, Jul 19, 2009 at 4:47 AM, Andrew Badera and...@badera.us wrote:


 On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 6:57 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky 
 zzn...@gmail.comwrote:


 On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 12:53 AM, Kevin Mesiabke...@mesiablabs.com
 wrote:
  A per follower charge is a fast way to obliterate the value of Twitter
 as a
  platform.

 I disagree. Businesses are using Twitter to listen to their customers
 and to engage with them. I think a business should be allowed to
 follow as many customers and prospects as they want, totally without
 limits and totally without charge. But I think they should pay for the
 right to appear in thousands of timelines and to send direct messages
 to thousands of people.



 The value you describe isn't usually found in direct followers (may as well
 call them fans) as it is in random conversations between
 less-biased/maniacal persons.

 The value of direct followers is direct interaction, which carries with it
 various biases and skews. Direct interaction is great for tech support, and
 for answering specific questions, but not for assessing consumer intent,
 confidence or general attitude.

 I think the non-direct conversation mining has a lot greater value for
 business.




PS It seems like you're thinking in conventional advertising terms, and that
just doesn't play well on the Internet. Charge them for access to the
medium in a way that derives value -- works. Charge them for access to the
medium to distribute their message -- does not work well/sustainably.


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-19 Thread Jennie Lees
On Sun, Jul 19, 2009 at 12:02 AM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
zzn...@gmail.comwrote:

 Man, it is so good to hear this from someone who's actually done it!
 The other point, though, is that the real thing, even traffic /
 social network analysis, is compute-resource intensive and requires a
 kind of programming knowledge that few have. So if something simple,
 like emoticon counting, provides *some* clues about sentiment, it may
 be worth doing. I'm not convinced, though, that it is worth doing.


I've been working on commercialising sentiment analysis research,
specifically tuned to microblogs and social media, and my investigations -
both academic and talking to potential customers - lead me to believe it
really is worth doing. Sentiment stuff specifically can be done far more
cheaply compute-wise than full-scale semantic understanding of language.

The key thing though, to any app developer or startup founder, is *not* to
rely on Twitter. We've been asked this several times by investors now: what
happens if Twitter fails? Develop stuff that's platform and network agnostic
and revel in the fact that there's definitely a ton of interest in the space
right now - despite some players being around for 10 years ;)

--J


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-19 Thread M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 4:19 PM, Jennie Leestrin...@gmail.com wrote:

 I've been working on commercialising sentiment analysis research,
 specifically tuned to microblogs and social media, and my investigations -
 both academic and talking to potential customers - lead me to believe it
 really is worth doing.

Oh, I'm convinced that the real thing is worth doing. I'm just not
convinced that

a. Emoticon counting has any value
b. Real NLP-based sentiment analysis can be done easily in Twitter,
given the way the language used in tweets evolves rapidly.

 Sentiment stuff specifically can be done far more
 cheaply compute-wise than full-scale semantic understanding of language.

The literature I've seen ranges from simple Bayesian calculations to
the work that Jodange is doing based on some research at Cornell. You
either buy a lot of RAM for your workstation / laptop and harness your
GPU for the linear algebra, or you stand up massively parallel
clusters in the cloud to process moderate-sized datasets. Maybe I'm
trying to solve a harder problem than I should be. ;-)

 The key thing though, to any app developer or startup founder, is *not* to
 rely on Twitter. We've been asked this several times by investors now: what
 happens if Twitter fails? Develop stuff that's platform and network agnostic
 and revel in the fact that there's definitely a ton of interest in the space
 right now - despite some players being around for 10 years ;)

There are quite a few interesting approaches / platforms / startups. I
think in the end the issue of Twitter stability / security /
scalability is a non-issue. Twitter is a *success* and the business
intelligence value of tweets will find a way to support the messaging
platform. ;-)

 --J



-- 
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
http://borasky-research.net

I've always regarded nature as the clothing of God. ~Alan Hovhaness


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

On Jul 16, 1:14 pm, Stuart stut...@gmail.com wrote:

 Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
 the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
 premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
 tracking.

I've got news for you ... Twitter itself is woefully behind the curve
on monitoring / marketing / analytics technologies. Third parties are
springing up daily with offerings in this area, many of them involving
cutting-edge natural language processing. Twitter could obviously
invest in these areas, but I'm not sure why they would, rather than
focusing on stability, scalability and security of the underlying
platform and messaging systems.

Perhaps one way to monetize Twitter would be to implement a per-
follower charge, say, free up to 2000 followers, then a small monthly
fee up to 10,000, a larger fee up to 100,000 and so on. I haven't seen
follower count distribution data recently, but I'd say that people
with more than 2000 followers are rare and are probably using Twitter
as a push marketing / sales platform in some sense. Of course, I'm
at around 3500 followers at the moment, so I would be paying a monthly
fee and would need to justify it as a business expense (or block about
1500 people, which isn't out of the question) ;-)


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread David Fisher

Show me these killer companies doing great NLP with social networks. I
find the ones that are doing stuff right now themselves are far behind
the curve and not really pushing stuff to the edge. They are often
marketing companies that have hired one NLP guy (and underpaid them)
and are just pushing the marketing side. I have yet to see anything
truly revolutionary come from most of these monitoring companies yet
and they are all too narrow focused. Plus, none of them have the VC
funding to really expand and grow (and not many people are getting new
funding these days)

-David

On Jul 18, 3:29 am, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky zzn...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Jul 16, 1:14 pm, Stuart stut...@gmail.com wrote:

  Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
  the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
  premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
  tracking.

 I've got news for you ... Twitter itself is woefully behind the curve
 on monitoring / marketing / analytics technologies. Third parties are
 springing up daily with offerings in this area, many of them involving
 cutting-edge natural language processing. Twitter could obviously
 invest in these areas, but I'm not sure why they would, rather than
 focusing on stability, scalability and security of the underlying
 platform and messaging systems.

 Perhaps one way to monetize Twitter would be to implement a per-
 follower charge, say, free up to 2000 followers, then a small monthly
 fee up to 10,000, a larger fee up to 100,000 and so on. I haven't seen
 follower count distribution data recently, but I'd say that people
 with more than 2000 followers are rare and are probably using Twitter
 as a push marketing / sales platform in some sense. Of course, I'm
 at around 3500 followers at the moment, so I would be paying a monthly
 fee and would need to justify it as a business expense (or block about
 1500 people, which isn't out of the question) ;-)


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread Nick Arnett
On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 12:49 AM, David Fisher tib...@gmail.com wrote:


 Show me these killer companies doing great NLP with social networks. I
 find the ones that are doing stuff right now themselves are far behind
 the curve and not really pushing stuff to the edge. They are often
 marketing companies that have hired one NLP guy (and underpaid them)
 and are just pushing the marketing side. I have yet to see anything
 truly revolutionary come from most of these monitoring companies yet
 and they are all too narrow focused. Plus, none of them have the VC
 funding to really expand and grow (and not many people are getting new
 funding these days)


Who says that a company has to create something truly revolutionary to be
successful?  There are plenty of big successes that got where they are by
packaging and distributing better than anyone else, not with great
breakthroughs.  Heard of Microsoft?

Sentiment analysis, like everything else that depends on computers figuring
out language, isn't great.  Nor is anyone really close to writing software
that comes understands language with context, nuance, etc.  Language isn't
even well understood enough for anyone to write code to emulate it; it is at
the core of human intelligence.  Language in 140 character chunks is
*really* hard.

If you think there are no well-funded, successful companies in this domain,
take a look at Nielsen/Buzzmetrics.  They've been at this for more than 10
years.  They acquired my patents, from a startup where we demonstrated basic
sentiment analysis in 2000 and 2001, showing that our software could rate
the sentiment of Usenet movie reviews with 80 percent accuracy and forecast
box office.

I would love to see more people tackling this kind of problem, but nobody is
likely to succeed if they don't realize what has worked and what hasn't over
the last decade and more.  Intelligence agencies and law enforcement have
used relevant techniques for 20-30 years.  For example, traffic analysis is
fundamental and doesn't require any NLP, just as the NSA is able to identify
command and control centers by their behavior without having to decode a
single encrypted transmission.  The danger of focusing on NLP and other
really hard problems is that you fail to apply known techniques in new ways.

Having said all that, I'll add that a lot of what I saw over the last few
years in social media analytics was pretty eye candy without much behind
it.  If that's all you look at, then yes, it seems quite shallow.  But I
would hope that serious developers know that that's not all there is.  The
systems I've built over the last decade have been based first on traffic
analysis, then social network analysis, and last, text/lingustic analysis...
and to do the latter well, humans were involved in the final summarization
of topics, trends and so forth.

Nick


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 12:49 AM, David Fisher tib...@gmail.com wrote:

 Show me these killer companies doing great NLP with social networks.

NLP, especially sentiment analysis, is hard. The fact that tweets
aren't English but an evolving language makes it harder. But there are
certainly companies, for example Attensity, that are doing much better
than the emoticon-counting that Twitter search does. And there is
http://twittersentiment.appspot.com/, a research project by some grad
students at Stanford. Perhaps you've heard of two other Stanford grad
students, Sergey Brin and Larry Page?

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
http://borasky-research.net

I've always regarded nature as the clothing of God. ~Alan Hovhaness


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 12:53 AM, Kevin Mesiabke...@mesiablabs.com wrote:
 A per follower charge is a fast way to obliterate the value of Twitter as a
 platform.

I disagree. Businesses are using Twitter to listen to their customers
and to engage with them. I think a business should be allowed to
follow as many customers and prospects as they want, totally without
limits and totally without charge. But I think they should pay for the
right to appear in thousands of timelines and to send direct messages
to thousands of people.

-- 
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
http://borasky-research.net

I've always regarded nature as the clothing of God. ~Alan Hovhaness


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread Nick Arnett
On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 3:53 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky zzn...@gmail.comwrote:



  And there is
 http://twittersentiment.appspot.com/, a research project by some grad
 students at Stanford. Perhaps you've heard of two other Stanford grad
 students, Sergey Brin and Larry Page?


Gilt by association?

Nick


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 7:15 AM, Nick Arnettnick.arn...@gmail.com wrote:
 If you think there are no well-funded, successful companies in this domain,
 take a look at Nielsen/Buzzmetrics.  They've been at this for more than 10
 years.  They acquired my patents, from a startup where we demonstrated basic
 sentiment analysis in 2000 and 2001, showing that our software could rate
 the sentiment of Usenet movie reviews with 80 percent accuracy and forecast
 box office.

Netflix, even without the contributions of the contest teams, is doing
pretty well too. ;-)

 I would love to see more people tackling this kind of problem, but nobody is
 likely to succeed if they don't realize what has worked and what hasn't over
 the last decade and more.  Intelligence agencies and law enforcement have
 used relevant techniques for 20-30 years.  For example, traffic analysis is
 fundamental and doesn't require any NLP, just as the NSA is able to identify
 command and control centers by their behavior without having to decode a
 single encrypted transmission.  The danger of focusing on NLP and other
 really hard problems is that you fail to apply known techniques in new ways.

 Having said all that, I'll add that a lot of what I saw over the last few
 years in social media analytics was pretty eye candy without much behind
 it.  If that's all you look at, then yes, it seems quite shallow.  But I
 would hope that serious developers know that that's not all there is.  The
 systems I've built over the last decade have been based first on traffic
 analysis, then social network analysis, and last, text/lingustic analysis...
 and to do the latter well, humans were involved in the final summarization
 of topics, trends and so forth.

Man, it is so good to hear this from someone who's actually done it!
The other point, though, is that the real thing, even traffic /
social network analysis, is compute-resource intensive and requires a
kind of programming knowledge that few have. So if something simple,
like emoticon counting, provides *some* clues about sentiment, it may
be worth doing. I'm not convinced, though, that it is worth doing.

-- 
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
http://borasky-research.net

I've always regarded nature as the clothing of God. ~Alan Hovhaness


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread Nick Arnett
On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 4:02 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky zzn...@gmail.comwrote:


 Netflix, even without the contributions of the contest teams, is doing
 pretty well too. ;-)


Different problem - they're aggregating votes, not trying to interpret
language.  Although it is certainly possible that some of the competitors
are using third-party sources and linguistic analysis... I thought briefly
about giving that a shot.


 Man, it is so good to hear this from someone who's actually done it!
 The other point, though, is that the real thing, even traffic /
 social network analysis, is compute-resource intensive and requires a
 kind of programming knowledge that few have. So if something simple,
 like emoticon counting, provides *some* clues about sentiment, it may
 be worth doing. I'm not convinced, though, that it is worth doing.


I'm not sure that's so true... there are a lot of tools out there that can
be hooked together.  The statistics and time series analytics call for some
advanced knowledge, but I doubt if much of it is beyond a master's degree
level.  I found the harder parts to be figuring out what business problems
can be solved, then packaging and presenting the data to people in a useful
manner that also can be automated.  There are a lot of graphs and
visualizations, especially network visualizations, that work for the data at
one point in time and become a mess when the data changes, so they are
useless in an automated system.  I was designing for executives who wanted
everything summarized in a page... definitely a challenge.  All the plumbing
is hard to maintain, too, which is an argument for standards that would
allow the pain to be shared.

Nick


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-18 Thread Chad Etzel

Bayesian filters are actually pretty good at sentiment analysis - of
course the quality of the classification is based upon the corpus of
information fed into the filters.

I implemented this for a while with http://flixpulse.com for movie
review tweet analysis.  It wasn't perfect, but the filters got
smarter really quickly. The hardest part, of course, was spending
the time to train them initially by classifying tweets manually.

I had to somewhat abandon FlixPulse to move on to other things, but I
hope to revive it at some point.
-Chad

On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 6:57 PM, Nick Arnettnick.arn...@gmail.com wrote:


 On Sat, Jul 18, 2009 at 3:53 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky zzn...@gmail.com
 wrote:


  And there is
 http://twittersentiment.appspot.com/, a research project by some grad
 students at Stanford. Perhaps you've heard of two other Stanford grad
 students, Sergey Brin and Larry Page?

 Gilt by association?

 Nick



[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread Peter Denton
OMG, I had no idea. Are you the Kroll guy?

On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 12:26 PM, Michael Yardley middleto...@gmail.comwrote:


 They are just running on Venture Capital.When the money runs out they
 will have to start chraging.You cannot run a business for FREE.People
 should have to pay to Twitter.So much a Tweet. LOL


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread Nick Arnett
On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 12:26 PM, Michael Yardley middleto...@gmail.comwrote:


 They are just running on Venture Capital.When the money runs out they
 will have to start chraging.You cannot run a business for FREE.People
 should have to pay to Twitter.So much a Tweet. LOL


Yeah, just like Google started charging us per search when they ran out of
money.

Nick


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread Dale Merritt
charge per API query?  Oopps

On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 12:45 PM, Nick Arnett nick.arn...@gmail.com wrote:



  On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 12:26 PM, Michael Yardley 
 middleto...@gmail.comwrote:


 They are just running on Venture Capital.When the money runs out they
 will have to start chraging.You cannot run a business for FREE.People
 should have to pay to Twitter.So much a Tweet. LOL


 Yeah, just like Google started charging us per search when they ran out of
 money.

 Nick



[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread Stuart

2009/7/16 Michael Yardley middleto...@gmail.com:

 They are just running on Venture Capital.When the money runs out they
 will have to start chraging.You cannot run a business for FREE.People
 should have to pay to Twitter.So much a Tweet. LOL

You really need to do some research before trolling like this.

Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
tracking. If Twitter can maintain their popularity big business will
pay a small fortune to be able to measure the effectiveness of the way
they're using their accounts.

In fact depending on how it's priced it's possible they won't need
many companies to pay for a premium account before they start making
an operating profit.

They, as well as most of the rest of the world, know that if they
started charging for all accounts they would quickly die and be
replaced by someone else trying to do it for free.

You're correct to say that free as a business model cannot work, but
there are thousands of examples out there of companies running a free
service that's supported by paid options. Google is the prime example
here, but it works for small companies too - 37signals is a huge
proponent of offering a free option alongside paid accounts and it's
worked very well for them.

Having said all that I would be very wary about building a company
solely based upon Twitter. While I don't think they're going anywhere
there's nothing stopping them implementing anything that you or I
could build and they'd quickly eat away at any market share we'd built
up. We've already seen a few examples of this over at Facebook.

I'm not saying I'd expect them to do something like that, but it's
possible and worth bearing in mind. A more likely scenario is that
they'd buy a company providing a particular service and integrate it
fully into the main product. If you're a competitor of that company
then you'd experience the same effects as if Twitter had built it
themselves.

Diversity is the key to survival when the environment you're operating
in changes as fast as the internet.

Anyway, those are my thoughts, do with them what you will.

-Stuart

-- 
http://stut.net/projects/twitter/


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread Nick Arnett
On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 1:14 PM, Stuart stut...@gmail.com wrote:


 Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
 the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
 premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
 tracking. If Twitter can maintain their popularity big business will
 pay a small fortune to be able to measure the effectiveness of the way
 they're using their accounts.


At the risk of really deviating from developer talk... We know this?  Who's
we and how do we know this?

I have a hard time seeing how analysis of Twitter alone would compete with
existing services that monitor brands in conversations across many
platforms.  I started one of the first companies to do that, ten years ago,
which is quite a head start... and it is now owned by one of the biggest
brand monitoring companies on the planet.  Lots of competition has come
along since then.

Anyway, this was fun, but it's not about developing code as such, so I'll
shut up.  Maybe this is a conversation for that non-platform-specific social
media developer community I was wondering about... ;-)

Nick


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread Andrew Badera
On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 4:26 PM, Nick Arnett nick.arn...@gmail.com wrote:



 On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 1:14 PM, Stuart stut...@gmail.com wrote:


 Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
 the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
 premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
 tracking. If Twitter can maintain their popularity big business will
 pay a small fortune to be able to measure the effectiveness of the way
 they're using their accounts.


 At the risk of really deviating from developer talk... We know this?  Who's
 we and how do we know this?

 I have a hard time seeing how analysis of Twitter alone would compete with
 existing services that monitor brands in conversations across many
 platforms.  I started one of the first companies to do that, ten years ago,
 which is quite a head start... and it is now owned by one of the biggest
 brand monitoring companies on the planet.  Lots of competition has come
 along since then.

 Anyway, this was fun, but it's not about developing code as such, so I'll
 shut up.  Maybe this is a conversation for that non-platform-specific social
 media developer community I was wondering about... ;-)

 Nick


We is anyone who have paid attention to the twitter dev list and blogs and
scuttlebutt. Biz has talked about the premium accounts. Contextual
advertising has been brought up several times. Search-driven monetization
has also been brought up.

Who's we? Anyone with their eyes and ears open.


Thanks-
- Andy Badera
- and...@badera.us
- Google me: http://www.google.com/search?q=andrew+badera
- This email is: [ ] bloggable [x] ask first [ ] private


[twitter-dev] Re: Twitter is not making money

2009-07-16 Thread David Fisher

Don't feed the trolls. Name a Venture backed startup that DOESNT run
on VC for the first few years. Ok? Right. Stupid topic. Lets move on
and talk about things that matter (ie. development)

On Jul 16, 4:34 pm, Andrew Badera and...@badera.us wrote:
 On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 4:26 PM, Nick Arnett nick.arn...@gmail.com wrote:

  On Thu, Jul 16, 2009 at 1:14 PM, Stuart stut...@gmail.com wrote:

  Twitter have a business plan, we're just not worthy enough to know all
  the details. What we know so far is that they're planning to launch a
  premium account type with a bunch of tools to aid brand and engagement
  tracking. If Twitter can maintain their popularity big business will
  pay a small fortune to be able to measure the effectiveness of the way
  they're using their accounts.

  At the risk of really deviating from developer talk... We know this?  Who's
  we and how do we know this?

  I have a hard time seeing how analysis of Twitter alone would compete with
  existing services that monitor brands in conversations across many
  platforms.  I started one of the first companies to do that, ten years ago,
  which is quite a head start... and it is now owned by one of the biggest
  brand monitoring companies on the planet.  Lots of competition has come
  along since then.

  Anyway, this was fun, but it's not about developing code as such, so I'll
  shut up.  Maybe this is a conversation for that non-platform-specific social
  media developer community I was wondering about... ;-)

  Nick

 We is anyone who have paid attention to the twitter dev list and blogs and
 scuttlebutt. Biz has talked about the premium accounts. Contextual
 advertising has been brought up several times. Search-driven monetization
 has also been brought up.

 Who's we? Anyone with their eyes and ears open.

 Thanks-
 - Andy Badera
 - and...@badera.us
 - Google me:http://www.google.com/search?q=andrew+badera
 - This email is: [ ] bloggable [x] ask first [ ] private