Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-07 Thread Alex Tweedly via use-livecode
Thanks. Can’t think of a better place to be locked in!
I’m sure Google thinks of what3words as a competitor, but also I suspect w3w 
keeps their mapping very close to their chest as a proprietary asset.

Alex .


Sent from my iPad

> On 7 Apr 2020, at 16:58, Ben Rubinstein via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> What a beautiful view you have! Interesting that Google Maps doesn't accept 
> what3words yet - possibly viewed as a competitor.
> 
>> On 04/04/2020 01:49, Alex Tweedly via use-livecode wrote:
>> And I'm at plump.magpie.tightest (sorry, no calculated height available, not 
>> even in annoying feet - but I'd guess somewhere around 2 or 3 metres).
>> Alex.
>>> On 03/04/2020 23:07, Graham Samuel via use-livecode wrote:
>>> A long way from me at 43°16′43″N 2°09′36″E 
>>> 
>>>  - and much higher (I’m about 130m). Sorry not to be quite so accurate!
>>> 
>>> Thanks
>>> 
>>> Graham
 On 3 Apr 2020, at 22:28, Devin Asay via use-livecode 
  wrote:
 
 Graham,
 
 You get back lat and long in degrees and fractions of degrees, as a 
 decimal numeral. For instance, I get latitude: 40.248676 and longitude: 
 -111.651062, and for good measure altitude in meters at 1398.380493. Wow, 
 now you all know exactly where I am!
 
 Devin
 
 
 
> On Apr 3, 2020, at 1:49 PM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can 
> someone tell me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by 
> mobileSensorReading et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer 
> showing seconds, or is it deg, min, sec - and are fractional seconds 
> returned (so, floating point)? I shall find out for myself eventually but 
> it would help a little to know now. AFAIKS there’s nothing in the LC 
> documentation about it.
> 
> Graham
> 
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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-07 Thread Ben Rubinstein via use-livecode
What a beautiful view you have! Interesting that Google Maps doesn't accept 
what3words yet - possibly viewed as a competitor.


On 04/04/2020 01:49, Alex Tweedly via use-livecode wrote:
And I'm at plump.magpie.tightest (sorry, no calculated height available, not 
even in annoying feet - but I'd guess somewhere around 2 or 3 metres).


Alex.

On 03/04/2020 23:07, Graham Samuel via use-livecode wrote:
A long way from me at 43°16′43″N 2°09′36″E 
 
- and much higher (I’m about 130m). Sorry not to be quite so accurate!


Thanks

Graham
On 3 Apr 2020, at 22:28, Devin Asay via use-livecode 
 wrote:


Graham,

You get back lat and long in degrees and fractions of degrees, as a decimal 
numeral. For instance, I get latitude: 40.248676 and longitude: 
-111.651062, and for good measure altitude in meters at 1398.380493. Wow, 
now you all know exactly where I am!


Devin



On Apr 3, 2020, at 1:49 PM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
 wrote:


This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone 
tell me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by 
mobileSensorReading et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer 
showing seconds, or is it deg, min, sec - and are fractional seconds 
returned (so, floating point)? I shall find out for myself eventually but 
it would help a little to know now. AFAIKS there’s nothing in the LC 
documentation about it.


Graham


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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-07 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
Thanks for everyone who has helped with this so far. I have now looked at and 
tested LC scripts for three different functions for finding the distance - I 
left one well-known one out (Vincenty) as it’s very complex (it even includes 
iteration) and I think not justified by what I’m trying to do. As I’m concerned 
with relatively small distances (up to a few kilometres), I can include a 
Pythagoras calculation (officially called "Equirectangular approximation”), 
which doesn’t take account of the curvature of the Earth. My tests have 
involved real coordinates of places I’ve visited, so can be verified using 
local maps etc.

What I have found is that the different methods are all good for my purposes, 
but for me the very simple Pythagoras calculation which involves only two maths 
functions, gives results which are consistently less than one percent different 
from the far more complex Haversine and even Vincenty calculations. 
Incidentally I get differences in Haversine between my implementation (based on 
Ralph’s, thanks) and Chris Veness’s (movable-type)  Javascript version - I’m 
pretty sure this is due to differences in precision in the underlying maths 
functions, but I don’t plan to look any further into that!

Just FYI, here’s the Pythagoras method. The inputs are assumed to be numerical 
GPS-style coordinates, which is what one gets from interrogating a GPS-aware 
device in LC. The result is in kilometres.

constant R=6371 -- the radius of the earth in kilometres
constant k1 = 0.01745329 -- that's pi/180

function distancePythag lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2
-- Calculate Distance between to points using Equirectangular approximation
-- Assuming a (local) flat surface, using Pythagoras. Won't work when Earth's 
curvature is significant
   local x,y
   put k1*lat1 into lat1
   put k1*lat2 into lat2
   put k1*lon1 into lon1
   put k1*lon2 into lon2
   put (lon2-lon1) * cos((lat1+lat2)/2) into x
   put (lat2 - lat1) into y
   return sqrt(x*x+y*y)*R
end distancePythag

Graham


> On 5 Apr 2020, at 22:03, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> I’ve been trying these formulae out, and I’ve been using the info on 
> https://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html - for my purposes 
> (distances from say 100 metres to up to a few kilometers) I think this works 
> as well as haversine, but maybe not for every kind of measurement. The 
> function gives a result in kilometres starting from coordinates in degrees. 
> Seems to work, but I need to do a bit more work on the (real) ground to 
> convince myself.
> 
> function distanceslc lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2
> 
> constant k1 = 0.017453 -- that's pi/180
> 
> -- This implements the spherical law of cosines, from movable-type.co.uk. 
> Confirmed with his javascript version
> 
> return acos(sin(lat1*k1) * sin(lat2*k1) + 
> cos(lat1*k1)*cos(lat2*k1)*cos(lon2*k1-lon1*k1))*6371
> 
> end distanceslc
> 
> 
> Graham
> 
>> On 4 Apr 2020, at 16:47, Ralph DiMola via use-livecode 
>>  wrote:
>> 
>> A friend of mine turned me on to this 10 years ago. This is the Haversine
>> formula. It assumes that the earth is sphere and is not very accurate for
>> very small distances. I have not tried to use the Vincenty's formula that
>> does better. For general purposes the HF should be sufficient.
>> 
>> Just give me the credit for LC implementation of a friends of mines routine.
>> Although I understand how it works the real credit goes to Don Josef de
>> Mendoza y Rios in 1796.
>> 
>> The girls and boys doing math in that period really set the stage. This
>> brought me back to my CGI days when I was patting myself on the back when I
>> self learned(with a friends help after reading the Kreyszig) how to move
>> points in space and calculate lighting.  I then self reflected and realized
>> that I was just putting together the pieces of math that these folks created
>> out of thin air. I still felt like I accomplished something but very much
>> smaller the scheme of things.
>> 
>> Ralph DiMola
>> IT Director
>> Evergreen Information Services
>> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net
>> 
>> -Original Message-
>> From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf
>> Of Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
>> Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 5:31 PM
>> To: How to use LiveCode
>> Cc: Bob Sneidar
>> Subject: Re: 
>> 
>> Ralph, this is brilliant. I remember trying to do something similar years
>> ago, and giving up because I didn't know how to do the math. I suck at math,
>> or rather I am too lazy and impatient to work the problem. 
>> 
>> Bob S
>> 
>>> On Apr 3, 2020, at 14:27 , Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
>>  wrote:
>>> 
>>> Graham,
>>> 
>>> This my distance calculation for what it's worth.
>>> 
>>> Function distance lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit
>>> -- Calculate Distance between to points
>>> --
>>> --lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2 are in deg.fractionalDegrees
>>> -- Unit
>>> -- if empty then miles
>>> -- K = kilometers
>>> -- N = nautical miles
>>> local theta
>>> local 

Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-05 Thread Mark Wieder via use-livecode

On 4/5/20 1:03 PM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode wrote:


constant k1 = 0.017453 -- that's pi/180



We're 20 years into the 21st century. Isn't it about time we could type

constant k1 = pi/180


--
 Mark Wieder
 ahsoftw...@gmail.com

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-05 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
I’ve been trying these formulae out, and I’ve been using the info on 
https://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html - for my purposes 
(distances from say 100 metres to up to a few kilometers) I think this works as 
well as haversine, but maybe not for every kind of measurement. The function 
gives a result in kilometres starting from coordinates in degrees. Seems to 
work, but I need to do a bit more work on the (real) ground to convince myself.

 function distanceslc lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2

constant k1 = 0.017453 -- that's pi/180

-- This implements the spherical law of cosines, from movable-type.co.uk. 
Confirmed with his javascript version

return acos(sin(lat1*k1) * sin(lat2*k1) + 
cos(lat1*k1)*cos(lat2*k1)*cos(lon2*k1-lon1*k1))*6371

end distanceslc


Graham

> On 4 Apr 2020, at 16:47, Ralph DiMola via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> A friend of mine turned me on to this 10 years ago. This is the Haversine
> formula. It assumes that the earth is sphere and is not very accurate for
> very small distances. I have not tried to use the Vincenty's formula that
> does better. For general purposes the HF should be sufficient.
> 
> Just give me the credit for LC implementation of a friends of mines routine.
> Although I understand how it works the real credit goes to Don Josef de
> Mendoza y Rios in 1796.
> 
> The girls and boys doing math in that period really set the stage. This
> brought me back to my CGI days when I was patting myself on the back when I
> self learned(with a friends help after reading the Kreyszig) how to move
> points in space and calculate lighting.  I then self reflected and realized
> that I was just putting together the pieces of math that these folks created
> out of thin air. I still felt like I accomplished something but very much
> smaller the scheme of things.
> 
> Ralph DiMola
> IT Director
> Evergreen Information Services
> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf
> Of Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
> Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 5:31 PM
> To: How to use LiveCode
> Cc: Bob Sneidar
> Subject: Re: 
> 
> Ralph, this is brilliant. I remember trying to do something similar years
> ago, and giving up because I didn't know how to do the math. I suck at math,
> or rather I am too lazy and impatient to work the problem. 
> 
> Bob S
> 
>> On Apr 3, 2020, at 14:27 , Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
>  wrote:
>> 
>> Graham,
>> 
>> This my distance calculation for what it's worth.
>> 
>> Function distance lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit
>>  -- Calculate Distance between to points
>>  --
>>  --lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2 are in deg.fractionalDegrees
>>  -- Unit
>>  -- if empty then miles
>>  -- K = kilometers
>>  -- N = nautical miles
>>  local theta
>>  local dist
>> 
>>  Put lon1 - lon2 into theta
>>  put Sin(deg2rad(lat1)) * Sin(deg2rad(lat2)) + Cos(deg2rad(lat1)) *
> Cos(deg2rad(lat2)) * Cos(deg2rad(theta)) into dist
>> 
>>  put Acos(dist) into dist
>>  put rad2deg(dist) into dist
>>  put dist * 60 * 1.1515 into dist
>> 
>>  switch unit
>> case "K"
>>put dist * 1.609344 into dist
>> case "N"
>>put dist * 0.8684 into dist
>>  end switch
>> 
>>  Return dist
>> 
>> End distance
>> 
>> 
>> Function rad2deg rad
>>  Return rad / PI * 180.0
>> end rad2deg
>> 
>> 
>> Ralph DiMola
>> IT Director
>> Evergreen Information Services
>> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net
> 
> 
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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-04 Thread Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
Exactly. :-)

Bob S


On Apr 4, 2020, at 10:59 AM, J. Landman Gay via use-livecode 
mailto:use-livecode@lists.runrev.com>> wrote:

A quip from my college days:

Time is what keeps everything from happening all at once. Space is what keeps 
everything from happening to YOU.

--
Jacqueline Landman Gay | 
jac...@hyperactivesw.com

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-04 Thread J. Landman Gay via use-livecode

A quip from my college days:

Time is what keeps everything from happening all at once. Space is what 
keeps everything from happening to YOU.


--
Jacqueline Landman Gay | jac...@hyperactivesw.com
HyperActive Software | http://www.hyperactivesw.com
On April 4, 2020 12:25:14 PM Bob Sneidar via use-livecode 
 wrote:


I see where people get confused. When we talk about dimensions, for most 
people the “Physical” in  “Physical Dimensions” is implied, just like when 
Dad says, “Hand me the map”, what he really means is, “Hand me the plastic 
coated street and highway map of the state of California that we just 
purchased at the 7-11 10 minutes ago". We use these abbreviated forms of 
implicit communication because being absolutely specific about aspect of 
every object or idea we wish to convey would be impossible.


Put another way, a chemist might say, “when I heat water to 212 degrees 
Farenheight, the water boils.” Implicit in that statement is the fact that 
he is at sea level, that the water is pure, that he is on the planet earth, 
that the air pressure is at or near a certain level, etc. Every such 
statement contains the unspoken, “All other things being equal” clause we 
always unconsciously take for granted.


So when physicists call Time (or anything else) another dimension, they are 
pulling a kind of, "bait and switch”. They stop talking about “Physical” 
dimensions, and begin talking about something else, but they never warn us 
of this transition! Here’s why I do not believe there are any more 
dimensions in the classical sense.


If I alter one of the dimensions of a 3D object, I do not affect the other 
two dimensions. But if a alter time itself, I alter ALL of the other 3 
dimensions. Time is more like a modifier of the physical dimensions. (One 
could also argue that spacial dimension creates the effect of time.)


Think of it this way. If I could make time infinitely short, everything 
would be reduced to an infinitely small point, because for there to be 
anything else, an object could theoretically be at one point in space and 
not another, implying that at another time it could be at another and not 
the original point.


This is an effect bantied about when discussing traveling at near light 
speeds. Not only does time compress (it is thought) but so does matter. The 
implication is that if you could get everywhere infinitely fast you would 
already be there and so there would be no time. And no space for that matter.


Bob S


On Apr 4, 2020, at 9:20 AM, Mark Wieder via use-livecode 
mailto:use-livecode@lists.runrev.com>> wrote:


On 4/4/20 8:37 AM, Bob Sneidar via use-livecode wrote:

Once I caught on, I realized that Mathematics was really a kind of 
numerical language for defining aspects of this 3 dimensional nature we 
call The Universe.


You're still stuck in 3? Try 10.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ca4miMMaCE

--
Mark Wieder
ahsoftw...@gmail.com

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-04 Thread Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
I see where people get confused. When we talk about dimensions, for most people 
the “Physical” in  “Physical Dimensions” is implied, just like when Dad says, 
“Hand me the map”, what he really means is, “Hand me the plastic coated street 
and highway map of the state of California that we just purchased at the 7-11 
10 minutes ago". We use these abbreviated forms of implicit communication 
because being absolutely specific about aspect of every object or idea we wish 
to convey would be impossible.

Put another way, a chemist might say, “when I heat water to 212 degrees 
Farenheight, the water boils.” Implicit in that statement is the fact that he 
is at sea level, that the water is pure, that he is on the planet earth, that 
the air pressure is at or near a certain level, etc. Every such statement 
contains the unspoken, “All other things being equal” clause we always 
unconsciously take for granted.

So when physicists call Time (or anything else) another dimension, they are 
pulling a kind of, "bait and switch”. They stop talking about “Physical” 
dimensions, and begin talking about something else, but they never warn us of 
this transition! Here’s why I do not believe there are any more dimensions in 
the classical sense.

If I alter one of the dimensions of a 3D object, I do not affect the other two 
dimensions. But if a alter time itself, I alter ALL of the other 3 dimensions. 
Time is more like a modifier of the physical dimensions. (One could also argue 
that spacial dimension creates the effect of time.)

Think of it this way. If I could make time infinitely short, everything would 
be reduced to an infinitely small point, because for there to be anything else, 
an object could theoretically be at one point in space and not another, 
implying that at another time it could be at another and not the original point.

This is an effect bantied about when discussing traveling at near light speeds. 
Not only does time compress (it is thought) but so does matter. The implication 
is that if you could get everywhere infinitely fast you would already be there 
and so there would be no time. And no space for that matter.

Bob S


On Apr 4, 2020, at 9:20 AM, Mark Wieder via use-livecode 
mailto:use-livecode@lists.runrev.com>> wrote:

On 4/4/20 8:37 AM, Bob Sneidar via use-livecode wrote:

Once I caught on, I realized that Mathematics was really a kind of numerical 
language for defining aspects of this 3 dimensional nature we call The Universe.

You're still stuck in 3? Try 10.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ca4miMMaCE

--
Mark Wieder
ahsoftw...@gmail.com

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-04 Thread Mark Wieder via use-livecode

On 4/4/20 8:37 AM, Bob Sneidar via use-livecode wrote:


Once I caught on, I realized that Mathematics was really a kind of numerical 
language for defining aspects of this 3 dimensional nature we call The Universe.


You're still stuck in 3? Try 10.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ca4miMMaCE

--
 Mark Wieder
 ahsoftw...@gmail.com

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-04 Thread Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
[ALERT: Waxing Philosophical]

I wholeheartedly agree. These people UNDERSTOOD Mathematics. This was a big 
problem for me as a child. I failed 6th grade math and had to go to summer 
school to pass, partly because I was lazy and wouldn’t do my home work, but 
also because I would sit in class and try to figure the nature of a problem, 
rather than just memorize the formulas. All the teachers wanted us to do was 
memorize things and pass quizzes.

When I got to Algebra however, I got 2 Bs, a C+ and the rest As, mainly because 
I had an AWESOME teacher who would take the time during and after class to 
explain to us the nature of what we were learning. Geometry, pretty much the 
same. As a radar technician in the navy, some degree of Calculus became 
essential.

Once I caught on, I realized that Mathematics was really a kind of numerical 
language for defining aspects of this 3 dimensional nature we call The 
Universe. If you have enough time, you can use Mathematics to define anything 
that exists, at least to whatever degree of resolution is required. That made 
sense to me, and I could see how it could be applied to great effect in any 
number of ways, so that got me hooked.

The problems I had with Mathematics still plagues me with Software Development. 
I fall into a trap sometimes of trying to see the whole picture, when what I 
really need to do at that moment is focus on a single aspect of what I am 
doing. It’s gotten a lot better though with time. I’ve learned to push aside 
that nagging urge to step back and work out the entire problem, and instead 
just get done what i’m presently on.

Mathematics, like Software Development, is exacting. Get any part of the 
equation wrong, and the result will be wrong. C.S. Lewis applies this principle 
to understanding why it is we sometimes need to think again about our world 
view. Once we see that the way we thought about some important aspect life was 
incorrect or misguided, it won’t do to continue on, simply because we want to 
continue to "make progress.”

He writes that while on a journey, once you have discovered you have taken a 
wrong turn, it isn’t progress at all to continue on the path you are on. You 
will never get to your desired destination. There’s nothing for it but to turn 
around and go back to where you went wrong, and begin again.

Bob S




On Apr 4, 2020, at 7:47 AM, Ralph DiMola via use-livecode 
mailto:use-livecode@lists.runrev.com>> wrote:

The girls and boys doing math in that period really set the stage. This
brought me back to my CGI days when I was patting myself on the back when I
self learned(with a friends help after reading the Kreyszig) how to move
points in space and calculate lighting.  I then self reflected and realized
that I was just putting together the pieces of math that these folks created
out of thin air. I still felt like I accomplished something but very much
smaller the scheme of things.

Ralph DiMola
IT Director
Evergreen Information Services
rdim...@evergreeninfo.net

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RE: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-04 Thread Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
A friend of mine turned me on to this 10 years ago. This is the Haversine
formula. It assumes that the earth is sphere and is not very accurate for
very small distances. I have not tried to use the Vincenty's formula that
does better. For general purposes the HF should be sufficient.

Just give me the credit for LC implementation of a friends of mines routine.
Although I understand how it works the real credit goes to Don Josef de
Mendoza y Rios in 1796.

The girls and boys doing math in that period really set the stage. This
brought me back to my CGI days when I was patting myself on the back when I
self learned(with a friends help after reading the Kreyszig) how to move
points in space and calculate lighting.  I then self reflected and realized
that I was just putting together the pieces of math that these folks created
out of thin air. I still felt like I accomplished something but very much
smaller the scheme of things.

Ralph DiMola
IT Director
Evergreen Information Services
rdim...@evergreeninfo.net

-Original Message-
From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf
Of Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 5:31 PM
To: How to use LiveCode
Cc: Bob Sneidar
Subject: Re: 

Ralph, this is brilliant. I remember trying to do something similar years
ago, and giving up because I didn't know how to do the math. I suck at math,
or rather I am too lazy and impatient to work the problem. 

Bob S

> On Apr 3, 2020, at 14:27 , Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
 wrote:
> 
> Graham,
> 
> This my distance calculation for what it's worth.
> 
> Function distance lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit
>   -- Calculate Distance between to points
>   --
>   --lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2 are in deg.fractionalDegrees
>   -- Unit
>   -- if empty then miles
>   -- K = kilometers
>   -- N = nautical miles
>   local theta
>   local dist
> 
>   Put lon1 - lon2 into theta
>   put Sin(deg2rad(lat1)) * Sin(deg2rad(lat2)) + Cos(deg2rad(lat1)) *
Cos(deg2rad(lat2)) * Cos(deg2rad(theta)) into dist
> 
>   put Acos(dist) into dist
>   put rad2deg(dist) into dist
>   put dist * 60 * 1.1515 into dist
> 
>   switch unit
>  case "K"
> put dist * 1.609344 into dist
>  case "N"
> put dist * 0.8684 into dist
>   end switch
> 
>   Return dist
> 
> End distance
> 
> 
> Function rad2deg rad
>   Return rad / PI * 180.0
> end rad2deg
> 
> 
> Ralph DiMola
> IT Director
> Evergreen Information Services
> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net


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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Alex Tweedly via use-livecode
And I'm at plump.magpie.tightest (sorry, no calculated height available, 
not even in annoying feet - but I'd guess somewhere around 2 or 3 metres).


Alex.

On 03/04/2020 23:07, Graham Samuel via use-livecode wrote:

A long way from me at 43°16′43″N 2°09′36″E 

 - and much higher (I’m about 130m). Sorry not to be quite so accurate!

Thanks

Graham

On 3 Apr 2020, at 22:28, Devin Asay via use-livecode 
 wrote:

Graham,

You get back lat and long in degrees and fractions of degrees, as a decimal 
numeral. For instance, I get latitude: 40.248676 and longitude: -111.651062, 
and for good measure altitude in meters at 1398.380493. Wow, now you all know 
exactly where I am!

Devin




On Apr 3, 2020, at 1:49 PM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
 wrote:

This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone tell 
me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by mobileSensorReading 
et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer showing seconds, or is it deg, 
min, sec - and are fractional seconds returned (so, floating point)? I shall 
find out for myself eventually but it would help a little to know now. AFAIKS 
there’s nothing in the LC documentation about it.

Graham

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Devin Asay
Director
Office of Digital Humanities
Brigham Young University

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Andrew at MidWest Coast Media via use-livecode
I feel that Calculate Distance script has been shared before, because it looks 
strikingly similar to one that I use in my mobile app (and is WAY better 
written than I ever could have done), so thank you.

Recently I was tasked by my cousin to come up with a delivery system for his 
brewery since they can only serve carryout during COVID. I did this using 
LiveCode server (https://midwestcoastmedia.com/beta_ltd/delivery.html 
) with Google Maps (and 
Untappd) APIs. Your post made me realize that I can update my current basic 
mobileLocation usage from just the “you are this far away” model to a “here’s 
how to get here” system. 

So thanks EVERYONE on this refresher! 
Here is the relevant code if anyone else finds it of interest. I was using 
$_POST values from an HTML form but you could easily modify the origin and 
destination to a number of formats:
## https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/directions/start
put urlEncode("12365 N Dumont Way, Littleton, CO 80125, USA") 
into tOrigin // his brewery
put 
"https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/directions/json?origin=; & tOrigin & 
"=" into tAPIurl
put urlEncode(tAddress1 & COMMA && tCity & COMMA && "CO" && 
tZip & COMMA && "USA") into tDestination
put tDestination after tAPIurl
put "=WHATEVERYOURAPIKEYISGOESHERE" after tAPIurl
put url tAPIurl into tJSON

—Andrew Bell


> 
> Ralph, this is brilliant. I remember trying to do something similar years 
> ago, and giving up because I didn't know how to do the math. I suck at math, 
> or rather I am too lazy and impatient to work the problem. 
> 
> Bob S
> 
>> On Apr 3, 2020, at 14:27 , Ralph DiMola via use-livecode 
>>  wrote:
>> 
>> Graham,
>> 
>> This my distance calculation for what it's worth.
>> 
>> Function distance lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit
>>  -- Calculate Distance between to points
>>  --
>>  --lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2 are in deg.fractionalDegrees
>>  -- Unit
>>  -- if empty then miles
>>  -- K = kilometers
>>  -- N = nautical miles
>>  local theta
>>  local dist
>> 
>>  Put lon1 - lon2 into theta
>>  put Sin(deg2rad(lat1)) * Sin(deg2rad(lat2)) + Cos(deg2rad(lat1)) * 
>> Cos(deg2rad(lat2)) * Cos(deg2rad(theta)) into dist
>> 
>>  put Acos(dist) into dist
>>  put rad2deg(dist) into dist
>>  put dist * 60 * 1.1515 into dist
>> 
>>  switch unit
>> case "K"
>>put dist * 1.609344 into dist
>> case "N"
>>put dist * 0.8684 into dist
>>  end switch
>> 
>>  Return dist
>> 
>> End distance
>> 
>> 
>> Function rad2deg rad
>>  Return rad / PI * 180.0
>> end rad2deg
>> 
>> 
>> Ralph DiMola
>> IT Director
>> Evergreen Information Services
>> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net
> 
> 
> 
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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
A long way from me at 43°16′43″N 2°09′36″E 

 - and much higher (I’m about 130m). Sorry not to be quite so accurate!

Thanks

Graham 
> On 3 Apr 2020, at 22:28, Devin Asay via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> Graham,
> 
> You get back lat and long in degrees and fractions of degrees, as a decimal 
> numeral. For instance, I get latitude: 40.248676 and longitude: -111.651062, 
> and for good measure altitude in meters at 1398.380493. Wow, now you all know 
> exactly where I am!
> 
> Devin
> 
> 
> 
>> On Apr 3, 2020, at 1:49 PM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
>>  wrote:
>> 
>> This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone 
>> tell me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by 
>> mobileSensorReading et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer showing 
>> seconds, or is it deg, min, sec - and are fractional seconds returned (so, 
>> floating point)? I shall find out for myself eventually but it would help a 
>> little to know now. AFAIKS there’s nothing in the LC documentation about it.
>> 
>> Graham
>> 
>> ___
>> use-livecode mailing list
>> use-livecode@lists.runrev.com
>> Please visit this url to subscribe, unsubscribe and manage your subscription 
>> preferences:
>> http://lists.runrev.com/mailman/listinfo/use-livecode
> 
> Devin Asay
> Director
> Office of Digital Humanities
> Brigham Young University
> 
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RE: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
Thanks Bob.

Whoops... I forgot to include this:


Function deg2rad deg
   Return (deg * PI / 180.0)
end deg2rad


Ralph DiMola
IT Director
Evergreen Information Services
rdim...@evergreeninfo.net


-Original Message-
From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf
Of Bob Sneidar via use-livecode
Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 5:31 PM
To: How to use LiveCode
Cc: Bob Sneidar
Subject: Re: 

Ralph, this is brilliant. I remember trying to do something similar years
ago, and giving up because I didn't know how to do the math. I suck at math,
or rather I am too lazy and impatient to work the problem. 

Bob S

> On Apr 3, 2020, at 14:27 , Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
 wrote:
> 
> Graham,
> 
> This my distance calculation for what it's worth.
> 
> Function distance lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit
>   -- Calculate Distance between to points
>   --
>   --lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2 are in deg.fractionalDegrees
>   -- Unit
>   -- if empty then miles
>   -- K = kilometers
>   -- N = nautical miles
>   local theta
>   local dist
> 
>   Put lon1 - lon2 into theta
>   put Sin(deg2rad(lat1)) * Sin(deg2rad(lat2)) + Cos(deg2rad(lat1)) *
Cos(deg2rad(lat2)) * Cos(deg2rad(theta)) into dist
> 
>   put Acos(dist) into dist
>   put rad2deg(dist) into dist
>   put dist * 60 * 1.1515 into dist
> 
>   switch unit
>  case "K"
> put dist * 1.609344 into dist
>  case "N"
> put dist * 0.8684 into dist
>   end switch
> 
>   Return dist
> 
> End distance
> 
> 
> Function rad2deg rad
>   Return rad / PI * 180.0
> end rad2deg
> 
> 
> Ralph DiMola
> IT Director
> Evergreen Information Services
> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net


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RE: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Ralph DiMola via use-livecode
Graham,

If Detailed is specified then an array with these 8 keys are returned. Example 
values are actual from an Android device.

"Altitude" integer in annoying meters. Ex: 88
"course" floating point in degrees Ex: 321.5 (I was walking due north)
"horizontal accuracy" integer also in annoying meters Ex: 12.136
"latitude" floating point in deg.fractionalDegrees Ex: 44.28052
"longitude floating point in deg.fractionalDegrees Ex: -74.681128
"Speed" in equally annoying KPH Ex: 1.28
"Timestamp" floating point in seconds Ex: 1585948616.576009
"Vertical accuracy" in ? but I would guess meters(cough) ex: 0  I don't believe 
this number. I don't know if this a limitation of Android, this device or 
Livecode.

Hope this helps.

Ralph DiMola
IT Director
Evergreen Information Services
rdim...@evergreeninfo.net

-Original Message-
From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf Of 
Graham Samuel via use-livecode
Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 3:49 PM
To: How to use LiveCode
Cc: Graham Samuel
Subject: Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone tell 
me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by mobileSensorReading 
et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer showing seconds, or is it deg, 
min, sec - and are fractional seconds returned (so, floating point)? I shall 
find out for myself eventually but it would help a little to know now. AFAIKS 
there’s nothing in the LC documentation about it.

Graham

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Håkan Liljegren via use-livecode
Most of the mobileSomething are wrappers around the system functions so you can 
learn a lot by reading the ios developer documentation as most of the functions 
started there.
And reading the docs I can see that you probably get a CLLocationCoordinate2D 
from the system and that is in turn two doubles in the WGS 84 system. I.e. you 
get a float for longitude and latitude.

I have code for distance calculation somewhere, that I built for a Quiz walk 
app, that I made for my sons birthday party several years ago. If you are 
interested I can dig it up.

I remember that the biggest problem was not calculating the distance it was 
translating lat long to some meaningful x,y coordinate.

Håkan
On 3 Apr 2020, 21:50 +0200, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
, wrote:
> This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone 
> tell me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by 
> mobileSensorReading et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer showing 
> seconds, or is it deg, min, sec - and are fractional seconds returned (so, 
> floating point)? I shall find out for myself eventually but it would help a 
> little to know now. AFAIKS there’s nothing in the LC documentation about it.
>
> Graham
>
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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Devin Asay via use-livecode
Graham,

You get back lat and long in degrees and fractions of degrees, as a decimal 
numeral. For instance, I get latitude: 40.248676 and longitude: -111.651062, 
and for good measure altitude in meters at 1398.380493. Wow, now you all know 
exactly where I am!

Devin



> On Apr 3, 2020, at 1:49 PM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone 
> tell me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by 
> mobileSensorReading et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer showing 
> seconds, or is it deg, min, sec - and are fractional seconds returned (so, 
> floating point)? I shall find out for myself eventually but it would help a 
> little to know now. AFAIKS there’s nothing in the LC documentation about it.
> 
> Graham
> 
> ___
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Devin Asay
Director
Office of Digital Humanities
Brigham Young University

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
This is cheeky but I can’t run up my mobile simulation today - can someone tell 
me the format of the geographical coordinates produced by mobileSensorReading 
et al. I mean, is say latitude just one integer showing seconds, or is it deg, 
min, sec - and are fractional seconds returned (so, floating point)? I shall 
find out for myself eventually but it would help a little to know now. AFAIKS 
there’s nothing in the LC documentation about it.

Graham

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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
Thanks Ralph, that really helps, along with Devin’s tutorial as well I should 
be able to make progress.

Graham

> On 3 Apr 2020, at 18:14, Ralph DiMola via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> 
> mobileLocationAuthorizationStatus() will tell you if the OS app setting will 
> allow location tracking
> mobileSensorAvailable("location") will tell you if there is a location sensor
> mobileStartTrackingSensor "Location", [true|false] will start the tracking.
> 
> mobileSensorReading("location", [true|false]) will return an array of the 
> current location. If the latitude or longitude is zero then the GPS is not 
> yet locked
> 
> Ralph DiMola
> IT Director
> Evergreen Information Services
> rdim...@evergreeninfo.net
> 
> 
> -Original Message-
> From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf 
> Of Graham Samuel via use-livecode
> Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 11:18 AM
> To: How to use LiveCode
> Cc: Graham Samuel
> Subject: Getting started with geographical coordinates
> 
> Hi
> 
> I am reviving my LiveCode skills in these troubled times, and I want to do 
> something that involves the location of a device using GPS. A very rapid 
> (obviously too rapid) search of the documentation finds commands like 
> iphoneStartTrackingLocation, but no link to a description of how one reads 
> the actual geographical coordinates or what form they take. There is a 
> reference to CoreLocation, but that hasn’t got a dictionary entry.
> 
> Can anyone point me in the right direction. Sorry if it’s obvious.
> 
> Thanks in advance
> 
> Graham
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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
Wow, Devin, that is luck! I shall look at it instantly. I have got a little 
further on my own but am rather disturbed that there seem to be iOS functions 
with no Android equivalent, e.g. mergCLDistanceBetween - but I am still totally 
ignorant really.

Thanks 

Graham

> On 3 Apr 2020, at 17:42, Devin Asay via use-livecode 
>  wrote:
> 
> Hi Graham,
> 
> As fate would have it I just created a video tutorial for my students on 
> reading mobile device sensors.
> 
> http://livecode.byu.edu/mobile/devicesensors-index.php
> 
> Hope you find these useful.
> 
> Devin
> 
> 
> On Apr 3, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
> mailto:use-livecode@lists.runrev.com>> wrote:
> 
> Hi
> 
> I am reviving my LiveCode skills in these troubled times, and I want to do 
> something that involves the location of a device using GPS. A very rapid 
> (obviously too rapid) search of the documentation finds commands like 
> iphoneStartTrackingLocation, but no link to a description of how one reads 
> the actual geographical coordinates or what form they take. There is a 
> reference to CoreLocation, but that hasn’t got a dictionary entry.
> 
> Can anyone point me in the right direction. Sorry if it’s obvious.
> 
> Thanks in advance
> 
> Graham
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RE: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Ralph DiMola via use-livecode

mobileLocationAuthorizationStatus() will tell you if the OS app setting will 
allow location tracking
mobileSensorAvailable("location") will tell you if there is a location sensor
mobileStartTrackingSensor "Location", [true|false] will start the tracking.

mobileSensorReading("location", [true|false]) will return an array of the 
current location. If the latitude or longitude is zero then the GPS is not yet 
locked

Ralph DiMola
IT Director
Evergreen Information Services
rdim...@evergreeninfo.net


-Original Message-
From: use-livecode [mailto:use-livecode-boun...@lists.runrev.com] On Behalf Of 
Graham Samuel via use-livecode
Sent: Friday, April 03, 2020 11:18 AM
To: How to use LiveCode
Cc: Graham Samuel
Subject: Getting started with geographical coordinates

Hi

I am reviving my LiveCode skills in these troubled times, and I want to do 
something that involves the location of a device using GPS. A very rapid 
(obviously too rapid) search of the documentation finds commands like 
iphoneStartTrackingLocation, but no link to a description of how one reads the 
actual geographical coordinates or what form they take. There is a reference to 
CoreLocation, but that hasn’t got a dictionary entry.

Can anyone point me in the right direction. Sorry if it’s obvious.

Thanks in advance

Graham
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Re: Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Devin Asay via use-livecode
Hi Graham,

As fate would have it I just created a video tutorial for my students on 
reading mobile device sensors.

http://livecode.byu.edu/mobile/devicesensors-index.php

Hope you find these useful.

Devin


On Apr 3, 2020, at 9:18 AM, Graham Samuel via use-livecode 
mailto:use-livecode@lists.runrev.com>> wrote:

Hi

I am reviving my LiveCode skills in these troubled times, and I want to do 
something that involves the location of a device using GPS. A very rapid 
(obviously too rapid) search of the documentation finds commands like 
iphoneStartTrackingLocation, but no link to a description of how one reads the 
actual geographical coordinates or what form they take. There is a reference to 
CoreLocation, but that hasn’t got a dictionary entry.

Can anyone point me in the right direction. Sorry if it’s obvious.

Thanks in advance

Graham
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Getting started with geographical coordinates

2020-04-03 Thread Graham Samuel via use-livecode
Hi

I am reviving my LiveCode skills in these troubled times, and I want to do 
something that involves the location of a device using GPS. A very rapid 
(obviously too rapid) search of the documentation finds commands like 
iphoneStartTrackingLocation, but no link to a description of how one reads the 
actual geographical coordinates or what form they take. There is a reference to 
CoreLocation, but that hasn’t got a dictionary entry.

Can anyone point me in the right direction. Sorry if it’s obvious.

Thanks in advance

Graham
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