Re: How to read cookie from different domain?

2011-02-16 Thread Randy S.
It is not possible to read a cookie from a different domain. That would be a
terrible security problem.

The browser will not send cookies that do not match your domain so no amount
of code tricks on the server handling this request will get you the cookie.

The third party cookies settings in browsers controls whether it is
possible to set cookies in requests for images and other assets for a page
that come from a domain that is different than the page's domain.
On Feb 16, 2011 7:58 AM, Paolo irresistible...@gmail.com wrote:
 Hi, I need to read a cookie from a different domain (it is not mine).
 I known the name ok cookie.

 When I create (write) a cookie, it is possible to set the name of domain:
 cookie.setDomain(.example.com);

 But It does'nt work for foreign domain just because security reasons,
infact I can not modify or create cookie for othen site, not own.

 But I think it is possible to READ cookie from other site. Just the user
set in own browser settings allow third party cookies.
 How can do it in wicket?

 I only know this instruction to read cookie, and in this I can not choose
the domain to use:
 Cookie[] cookies =
((WebRequest)getRequestCycle().getRequest()).getCookies();

 This is my test application:


=
 !DOCTYPE html PUBLIC -//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN
 http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd;
 html xmlns=http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml;
 xmlns:wicket=http://wicket.apache.org/; xml:lang=en lang=en
 head
 titleWicket cookie test/title
 /head
 body
 a wicket:id=create_cookieCreate Cookie/a
 br /br /br /
 a wicket:id=read_cookieRead Cookie/a
 /body
 /html


==

 package org.wicket.example;

 import org.apache.wicket.markup.html.WebPage;
 import org.apache.wicket.markup.html.link.Link;
 import org.apache.wicket.protocol.http.WebResponse;
 import org.apache.wicket.protocol.http.WebRequest;

 import javax.servlet.http.Cookie;


 public class TestPage extends WebPage {
 /**
 * Constructor
 */
 public TestPage() {
 }

 @Override
 protected void onInitialize() {
 super.onInitialize();

 add(new LinkTestPage(create_cookie) {

 private static final long serialVersionUID = 6762033052623200948L;

 @Override
 public void onClick() {
 ((WebResponse) getResponse()).addCookie(createCookie());
 setResponsePage(TestPage.class);
 }
 });
 add(new LinkTestPage(read_cookie) {

 private static final long serialVersionUID = 6762033052623200948L;

 @Override
 public void onClick() {
 Cookie[] cookies =
((WebRequest)getRequestCycle().getRequest()).getCookies();
 System.out.println(cookies[0].getName());
 setResponsePage(TestPage.class);
 }
 });
 }

 /**
 * Creates test cookie
 * @return cookie
 */
 public Cookie createCookie() {
 Cookie cookie = new Cookie(wicketTest, 1);
 // cookie.setDomain(.example.com);
 cookie.setMaxAge(6000);
 return cookie;
 }

 }

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Re: wicket-ajax.js header contribution with script that includes a less than character

2011-02-03 Thread Randy S.
Matthias: of course, reversing the options should be the easiest and most
obvious workaround. Thank you.

Pedro: I could try to escape the . Presumably this would be using its
entity lt; but it's not immediately obvious whether that would work because
of the various levels of encoding. The entire header contribution is in a
CDATA for the XHR so it would not get decoded there. I'm away from the
project at the moment but I will try this later.

Anyway, I will submit it as a bug and may be able to offer some insight into
the reason and possible fix. I suspect it has to do with crazy
(browser-specific) hoop jumping in wicket-ajax.js's processing of the ajax
response. That looks like a good bit of volatile code to make it work as
well as it does.
On Feb 3, 2011 4:18 AM, Matthias Gasser matthias.gas...@gmail.com wrote:
 A time ago I faced a similar problem, but not with wicket...

 I needed to escape the  character somehow, or try to reverse the
arguments

 like: 0  someVariable.


 see http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1193471seqNum=9



 Am 03.02.2011 um 08:56 schrieb Randy S.:

 Hi all. I have narrowed a problem down to the following scenario:

 I have a panel with this:

 wicket:head
 script
 if (someVariable  0) {
 someVariable = 0;
 }
 /script
 /wicket:head

 This script fails to execute when the panel is loaded by ajax. If I
replace
 the less than character  with equals ==, then it executes (but of
 course, this is not what I need).

 I tested this in Firefox 4.0b10 and Chrome 8.

 I have searched a lot for others facing this issue, and also tried to dig
 through wicket-ajax.js, but it is time to ask here in case it is a known
 issue.

 I 'm sure I can put the code into a separate JS file as a workaround but
I
 wanted to save another network hop. Another solution would be to embed
the
 script in wicket:panel rather than wicket:head, but that has the
 disadvantage of re-sending the script with the panel content when the
panel
 is re-used on the same page.

 Thanks for any help/info.


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Re: wicket-ajax.js header contribution with script that includes a less than character

2011-02-03 Thread Randy S.
Thanks, Igor.

https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/WICKET-3420



On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 11:01 AM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.comwrote:

 wicket should do this for you. please file a bug.

 -igor

 On Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 6:09 AM, Randy S. randypo...@gmail.com wrote:
  Matthias: of course, reversing the options should be the easiest and most
  obvious workaround. Thank you.
 
  Pedro: I could try to escape the . Presumably this would be using its
  entity lt; but it's not immediately obvious whether that would work
 because
  of the various levels of encoding. The entire header contribution is in a
  CDATA for the XHR so it would not get decoded there. I'm away from the
  project at the moment but I will try this later.
 
  Anyway, I will submit it as a bug and may be able to offer some insight
 into
  the reason and possible fix. I suspect it has to do with crazy
  (browser-specific) hoop jumping in wicket-ajax.js's processing of the
 ajax
  response. That looks like a good bit of volatile code to make it work as
  well as it does.
  On Feb 3, 2011 4:18 AM, Matthias Gasser matthias.gas...@gmail.com
 wrote:
  A time ago I faced a similar problem, but not with wicket...
 
  I needed to escape the  character somehow, or try to reverse the
  arguments
 
  like: 0  someVariable.
 
 
  see http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1193471seqNum=9
 
 
 
  Am 03.02.2011 um 08:56 schrieb Randy S.:
 
  Hi all. I have narrowed a problem down to the following scenario:
 
  I have a panel with this:
 
  wicket:head
  script
  if (someVariable  0) {
  someVariable = 0;
  }
  /script
  /wicket:head
 
  This script fails to execute when the panel is loaded by ajax. If I
  replace
  the less than character  with equals ==, then it executes (but of
  course, this is not what I need).
 
  I tested this in Firefox 4.0b10 and Chrome 8.
 
  I have searched a lot for others facing this issue, and also tried to
 dig
  through wicket-ajax.js, but it is time to ask here in case it is a
 known
  issue.
 
  I 'm sure I can put the code into a separate JS file as a workaround
 but
  I
  wanted to save another network hop. Another solution would be to embed
  the
  script in wicket:panel rather than wicket:head, but that has the
  disadvantage of re-sending the script with the panel content when the
  panel
  is re-used on the same page.
 
  Thanks for any help/info.
 
 
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wicket-ajax.js header contribution with script that includes a less than character

2011-02-02 Thread Randy S.
Hi all.  I have narrowed a problem down to the following scenario:

I have a panel with this:

wicket:head
script
if (someVariable  0) {
someVariable = 0;
}
/script
/wicket:head

This script fails to execute when the panel is loaded by ajax.  If I replace
the less than character  with equals ==, then it executes (but of
course, this is not what I need).

I tested this in Firefox 4.0b10 and Chrome 8.

I have searched a lot for others facing this issue, and also tried to dig
through wicket-ajax.js, but it is time to ask here in case it is a known
issue.

I 'm sure I can put the code into a separate JS file as a workaround but I
wanted to save another network hop. Another solution would be to embed the
script in wicket:panel rather than wicket:head, but that has the
disadvantage of re-sending the script with the panel content when the panel
is re-used on the same page.

Thanks for any help/info.


Re: Logout (Session destroy) on the last (stateful) page?

2010-12-04 Thread Randy S.
If that bookmarkable uri is a stateless page, will that prevent a new
session from being established? (Assuming the default session store is in
use)
On Dec 3, 2010 10:14 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com wrote:
 it is a good idea to always redirect to a bookmarkable url after
 invalidating your session.

 -igor

 On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 2:08 AM, Ernesto Reinaldo Barreiro
 reier...@gmail.com wrote:
 e.g. you could:

 1-Place and AbstractDefaultAjaxBehavior on you page (e.g. to some div
 on your page). Use urlFor to generate the URL to this behavior.  On

 respond(AjaxRequestTarget target) {
Invalidate your session.
 }

 2-Make your page implement IHeaderContributor and on

 public void renderHead(IHeaderResponse response)  {
response.renderOnDomReadyJavascript(here use jquery AJAX
to call
 URL of step 1);
 }

 Ernesto

 On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 10:54 AM, Ernesto Reinaldo Barreiro
 reier...@gmail.com wrote:
 Hi Matt,

 I see. Then maybe adding some onDomReady javascript to
 ConfirmationPage that simply goes back to the server and invalidates
 the session? Probably this can't use wicket AJAX machinery: because
 that will probably will also trigger a redirect.

 Regards,

 Ernesto

 On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 10:46 AM, Matthias Keller
 matthias.kel...@ergon.ch wrote:
 Hi Ernesto

 No that's not possible because the ConfirmationPage is *stateful* and
 contains lots of information from the session/page state, so it must be
 allowed to display the pre-rendered page once but after that request,
the
 session must be invalidated.

 Thanks

 Matt

 On 2010-12-02 10:34, Ernesto Reinaldo Barreiro wrote:

 Matt,

 Can't you just do some kind of trick so that your ConfirmationPage is
 served as the home page? So that you invalidate the session but at
 getHomePage() you temporarily return your ConfirmationPage?

 Regards,

 Ernesto

 On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 10:06 AM, Matthias Keller
 matthias.kel...@ergon.ch  wrote:

 Hi Randy

 Yes it appears to have something to do with that. Our app uses the
 REDIRECT_BUFFER by default (we never actively configured this though)
 which
 appears to be a sensible option for normal operation. I'm not very
 familiar
 with the render strategies but you appear to be right: The page is
 actually
 rendered at the end of the previous request where the session is
 invalidated
 too. Then a redirect happens to the pre-rendered page which fails
because
 the Session is already gone...

 Is there any hook that will be called at the end of the second
request
 serving the pre-rendered content?
 I found a workaround for the moment: In the previous page, I
explicitly
 set
 setRedirect(false); but this has the consequence that if the user
hits
 reload on the confirmation page, he will first be asked about
resending
 the
 POST parameters...

 Anything we could do to invalidate the session at the end of the
serving
 of
 the prerendered page?

 Thanks a lot

 Matt

 On 2010-12-01 20:44, Randy S. wrote:

 Does the redirect to the home page happen because of Wicket's
default
 render
 strategy (REDIRECT_TO_BUFFER) that causes two requests?  You
invalidate
 session on the first which redirects to the buffered response. When
the
 second request comes in expecting to get the already-rendered
response,
 you
 get a new session.


 On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 11:53 AM, Martin Makundi
 martin.maku...@koodaripalvelut.comwrote:

 Hi!

 I am curious too. For this reason we had to build our logoutpage so
 that it invalidtes session logically but not in httpsession sense.

 Only clicking something from login page will do that.

 But it's a hack, I would like to know what's the proper way ;)

 **
 Martin



 2010/12/1 Matthias Kellermatthias.kel...@ergon.ch:

 Hi

 I've got the following problem:
 After a user completes a wizard, he sees a last confirmation page

 containing

 some data, thus it must be a stateful page called by the following
 code

 from

 the wizard:

 setResponsePage(new ConfirmationPage(myBean));

 This ConfirmationPage must only be displayed once, thus if the
user
 does

 a

 refresh it must not be available anymore.
 I expected that I would be able to call  session.invalidate() from

 somewhere

 within the ConfirmationPage's onAfterRender or onDetach methods.
 Unfortunately, whenever I do this, the user is automatically
 redirected

 to

 the home page without a trace in the logs
 Any idea how to do that?

 Thanks

 Matt







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Re: Logout (Session destroy) on the last (stateful) page?

2010-12-01 Thread Randy S.
Does the redirect to the home page happen because of Wicket's default render
strategy (REDIRECT_TO_BUFFER) that causes two requests?  You invalidate
session on the first which redirects to the buffered response. When the
second request comes in expecting to get the already-rendered response, you
get a new session.


On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 11:53 AM, Martin Makundi 
martin.maku...@koodaripalvelut.com wrote:

 Hi!

 I am curious too. For this reason we had to build our logoutpage so
 that it invalidtes session logically but not in httpsession sense.

 Only clicking something from login page will do that.

 But it's a hack, I would like to know what's the proper way ;)

 **
 Martin



 2010/12/1 Matthias Keller matthias.kel...@ergon.ch:
  Hi
 
  I've got the following problem:
  After a user completes a wizard, he sees a last confirmation page
 containing
  some data, thus it must be a stateful page called by the following code
 from
  the wizard:
 
  setResponsePage(new ConfirmationPage(myBean));
 
  This ConfirmationPage must only be displayed once, thus if the user does
 a
  refresh it must not be available anymore.
  I expected that I would be able to call  session.invalidate() from
 somewhere
  within the ConfirmationPage's onAfterRender or onDetach methods.
  Unfortunately, whenever I do this, the user is automatically redirected
 to
  the home page without a trace in the logs
  Any idea how to do that?
 
  Thanks
 
  Matt
 
 

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RE: Wicket site on Android phone

2010-10-12 Thread Randy S.
A big advantage of the iphone browser is its ability to scroll an inner
scrolling box (scrollable div or iframe, for example). It does this by
handling a two-finger drag as scroll. I'm not aware of a way to do the same
with the android browser.

We also are facing demand for a desktop web app to be used on android so
we are considering in some cases simplifying the UI to accommodate this. One
example is bouncing to a different page rather than using a modal dialog for
some interactions.

Back on topic for Wicket, scrolling is the only barrier we have seen.
Everything else works. For what it's worth, a lot of our ajax stuff is
wiquery-based.
On Oct 8, 2010 3:58 AM, Chris Colman chr...@stepaheadsoftware.com wrote:
 The Android market is going through spectacular growth at the moment.
 It's going bezerk!

 http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2010/10/05/the-rise-of-android-what-does-it-
 mean-for-apple-users/

 The fact that it supports Flash and that its apps are written in Java
 instead of Objective C like the iPhone (last I heard of that language
 was in 1989!) made it extremely attractive to me but even without
 writing specific Android apps the fact that it has a proper browser
 means that wicket powered sites around the world will start to get
 visited, a lot, by yet another browser type. They've also found that
 Andtroid users, on average, pull down 25% more data per month on their
 iPhone cousins - apparently they're a lot more tech savvy crowd - less
 'Angry Birds' and more ServerSide etc.,

 Coming from Java world my knowledge of JavaScript is very limited so I
 don't know how helpful I'll be in debugging the Javascript as executed
 on a Webkit/Android browser.

 If anyone else out there has a wicket website and an Android phone I'd
 like to know if you experience some of the problem I did. It only
 appears to affect JavaScript - standard HTML form submission seems fine
 - as expected.

 - Chris

-Original Message-
From: Martin Grigorov [mailto:mgrigo...@apache.org]
Sent: Friday, 8 October 2010 12:06 AM
To: users@wicket.apache.org
Subject: Re: Wicket site on Android phone

I guess it is some WebKit related Javascript issues.
Don't know how hard is to debug them but if you manage - send us a
 patch ;-
)

On Thu, Oct 7, 2010 at 2:03 PM, Chris Colman
chr...@stepaheadsoftware.comwrote:

 I've just picked up a new Android phone (HTC Desire - awesome phone
 BTW)
 and most of our wicket powered site works well. There are two issues
 which maybe just me not knowing how to use the phone properly or they
 may be issues with the Webkit based browser on those things:
 1. I haven't been able to grab the caption on modal windows in
 order to drag them around on the screen. Being a 'touch' based
 paradigm
 maybe there is no such thing as a 'grab'.
 2. Clicking the OK button on a modal window doesn't seem to have
 any effect - the modal stays open.
 I have only had the phone for a couple of days so the issues could be
 all me - not knowing how to perform the above operations - if anyone
 has
 some enlightenment, please let me know.



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Re: Wicket in JBoss cluster

2009-10-22 Thread Randy S.
Isn't this caused by the storage of past pages in files on disk rather than
in HTTP Session? This is in the default ISessionStore implementation (see
SecondLevelCacheSessionStore, DiskPageStore).

On Thu, Oct 22, 2009 at 3:27 PM, Jan Grathwohl jan.grathw...@googlemail.com
 wrote:

 Dear all,

 would you be so kind and share your experience about whether it is
 reasonable to use Wicket for app development in the following situation:

 We are planning to develop an application that will be deployed in our
 customer's portlet environment (JBoss Portal). There will be two clustered
 JBoss instances with JBoss's own session replication mechanism enabled. The
 main reason for the clustering is to have failover that should be
 transparent for logged in users, and this has to work really reliably. I
 don't know what the exact configuration of the load balancer and the JBoss
 servers will be, and how much influence we will have on it.

 Is it safe to use wicket in such a situation, or should we rather go for a
 more stateless framework?

 I did some tests to run a very simple Wicket app in two clustered JBoss
 instances, and after I shut down the instance with the active session, the
 session continues to be available on the other cluster node, and the links
 in the pages still work. So far, so good. But when I hit the browser's back
 button, I receive a Page Expired Error. This probably means that the
 content
 of the page store is not correctly replicated to the other cluster node?

 Is this a known limitation, or caused by some wrong configuration?

 Thanks for any feedback on these topics, please let me know what your
 experiences and opinions are.

 Kind regards,

 Jan



Re: Wicket in JBoss cluster

2009-10-22 Thread Randy S.
Are you saying that because HTTP Session will contain the
last-displayed-page, a single back button after failover should have worked
because the second server would have persisted that one page to its own
disk?

On Thu, Oct 22, 2009 at 4:49 PM, Matej Knopp matej.kn...@gmail.com wrote:

 Yes. But wicket tries to store the page being sent across cluster
 during replication when the session is deserialized on target node.

 -Matej

 On Thu, Oct 22, 2009 at 11:46 PM, Randy S. randypo...@gmail.com wrote:
  Isn't this caused by the storage of past pages in files on disk rather
 than
  in HTTP Session? This is in the default ISessionStore implementation (see
  SecondLevelCacheSessionStore, DiskPageStore).



Re: Wicket in JBoss cluster

2009-10-22 Thread Randy S.
Oh I see. Thanks for the explanation.

I can't comment on JBoss's session replication. I'm familiar with websphere
with a DB-backed session which does not deserialize until it has to re-load
from the DB, either because you bounced nodes or had the session expunged
from memory due to the limit of in-memory sessions.

On Oct 22, 2009 5:41 PM, Matej Knopp matej.kn...@gmail.com wrote:

Not quite. On every request when page is changed and the session with
page is replicated on cluster the receiving nodes should store the
page to diskpagestore. This way every state of page should be saved.
But this will only work if the container deserializes sessions
immediately after replication.

-Matej

On Fri, Oct 23, 2009 at 12:00 AM, Randy S. randypo...@gmail.com wrote: 
Are you saying that beca...

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Re: Italian Bank (was Re: Wicket 1.4.2 Released!)

2009-10-14 Thread Randy S.
Thanks for the info, Giovanni. Please let us know of any Wicket apps
released, especially if there is something we can check out without having
accounts. (I don't live in Italy.)

On Wed, Oct 14, 2009 at 2:32 AM, Giovanni pino_o...@yahoo.com wrote:

 The bank is Intesa San Paolo: http://www.group.intesasanpaolo.com



Italian Bank (was Re: Wicket 1.4.2 Released!)

2009-10-13 Thread Randy S.
Giovanni,
What bank is this?  What is the URL and is there anything of particular
interest that we can see without accounts?

On Sat, Oct 10, 2009 at 7:05 AM, Giovanni pino_o...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Wow!!!

 I will upgrade my project for a major italian bank on coming monday.

 Thanks a lot for all your efforts in developing this great web framework!

 Best regards,
 giovanni




Re: Complicated workflows

2009-09-30 Thread Randy S.
We are also trying to find the right balance of how much we move to
declarative. It will depend on how well we get Web Flow to fit in.  With
Wicket being Controller-less and wanting to launch right into the home
page, Web Flow is a clear candidate to do initial data load and logic to
determine the first page. With Wicket out of the box, it seems that the
app's home page would need to have this conditional logic which could
include different panels or redirect depending on state. But that doesn't
seem very elegant. Also, because we run in very large clusters, redirects
are out of the question due to the potential that the second request hits a
different server before HTTP session has been properly persisted/shared.


On Wed, Sep 30, 2009 at 1:51 AM, Phil Housley undeconstruc...@gmail.comwrote:

 2009/9/30 Randy S. randypo...@gmail.com:
  Have you thought about using Spring Web Flow for this? I'm not a SWF
 expert,
  but it sounds like something well-tailored to your needs. For example, a
  flow can have steps that don't have UIs.
 
  Our group at work is looking into Wicket  SWF integration. I have a seen
 a
  few comments on the web from folks like Peter Thomas who conclude that
 you
  don't need to use SWF with Wicket. We need to externalize the flow of
 some
  applications so we have discussed shallow integration (where, for
 example, a
  button.onClick explicitly calls SWF to determine what to do next), as
 well
  as deep(er) integration (perhaps at the RequestCycleProcessor. At the
  moment, we are leaning toward the shallow/lightweight integration which
  gives lots of flexibility to each application to respond to a flow's
  response in different ways (show a new page, update components via Ajax,
  redirect to another URL, etc.).
 
  In case anyone is interested, reasons we need to externalize flow on some
  apps are things like: Complex business rules, business unit authoring of
  flow (via a controlled UI), and delegation to a business process manager
  layer.

 Actually, I hadn't realised that WebFlow wasn't limited to Spring MVC.
  Looking at it now, I am doing something fairly similar, so I probably
 ought to take a longer look...

 The reasons I started on this thing with code rather than going
 totally declarative is that my current experience is that there will
 be sufficient corner cases to make it necessary to regularly subclass
 actions or panels for a particular instance.  Where that isn't
 required, I was thinking that a Spring context file would provide a
 nice declarative way of configuring everything, with prototype scope
 beans etc being well fitted to creating tasks.

 Despite all that, I don't particularly want a hard dependency on
 anything other than Wicket, so plain Java first, other things
 hopefully on top.

 Phil

  On Tue, Sep 29, 2009 at 4:11 PM, Phil Housley undeconstruc...@gmail.com
 wrote:
 
  Hello list,
 
  I'm currently working on some ideas for building apps with fairly
  complex workflows.  My aim is to find a nice pattern/framework for
  building apps where each unit of work involves many panels, several
  forms, lots of decisions and so on.  In particular I'm aiming at apps
  where you need to be very confident about exactly what is happening,
  so very strict control of actions, being careful of multiple
  renderings of a page each trying to change the server data, and so on.
   Also, I'm wondering about some options for declarative building of
  workflows out of existing tasks.
 
  My current design involves running from a special page, which
  maintains a stack of tasks.  One type of task is a Workflow, which can
  be configured to automatically spawn subtasks as required, based on
  the result of previous tasks.  Another type of task is based on a
  panel, and is able to cause itself to be rendered.  The stack
  processor makes sure that each task is invoked at the right time, that
  a task can render if it is at the top of the stack, that only the top
  of the stack can be invoked from a form and so on.
 
  This is working ok for some silly demo cases, but there are various
  issues.  For example, any task that is not also a component cannot
  access dependency injection, or set error messages and so on.  I'm not
  sure how to get around this at the moment, as I don't want to force
  every task to be a component, when many will likely have no cause to
  ever be rendered.
 
  So, the reason I'm posting is to ask mainly two things:
 
  1) Is this of interest to anyone else?  All the code is my own, so
  I'll open source it if there seems to be some future in it.
 
  2) If so, does anyone have any comments on my current design?  Clearly
  there are problems with it, but should I carry on trying to find ways
  to work around them, or does the whole thing sounds like so much
  crack?
 
  Thanks,
 
  --
  Phil Housley

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Re: RE: Complicated workflows

2009-09-30 Thread Randy S.
We use server affinity but you can't guarantee same server and I can't go in
with a 100% plan. We have had funny routing in some cases where requests
from the same user even bounce from one data center to another... and back.
We've done a lot of work to prevent these things but in the end it's never
guaranteed.

On the other hand, the chances of two back-to-back requests (as in the case
of a redirect) being routed to the same node are extremely high.

On Sep 30, 2009 9:58 PM, Chris Colman chr...@stepaheadsoftware.com
wrote:

 Also, because we run in very large clusters, redirects  are out of the
question due to the potent...
Can't you set up server affinity for the cluster to avoid that from
occurring?

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Re: Complicated workflows

2009-09-29 Thread Randy S.
Have you thought about using Spring Web Flow for this? I'm not a SWF expert,
but it sounds like something well-tailored to your needs. For example, a
flow can have steps that don't have UIs.

Our group at work is looking into Wicket  SWF integration. I have a seen a
few comments on the web from folks like Peter Thomas who conclude that you
don't need to use SWF with Wicket. We need to externalize the flow of some
applications so we have discussed shallow integration (where, for example, a
button.onClick explicitly calls SWF to determine what to do next), as well
as deep(er) integration (perhaps at the RequestCycleProcessor. At the
moment, we are leaning toward the shallow/lightweight integration which
gives lots of flexibility to each application to respond to a flow's
response in different ways (show a new page, update components via Ajax,
redirect to another URL, etc.).

In case anyone is interested, reasons we need to externalize flow on some
apps are things like: Complex business rules, business unit authoring of
flow (via a controlled UI), and delegation to a business process manager
layer.



On Tue, Sep 29, 2009 at 4:11 PM, Phil Housley undeconstruc...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hello list,

 I'm currently working on some ideas for building apps with fairly
 complex workflows.  My aim is to find a nice pattern/framework for
 building apps where each unit of work involves many panels, several
 forms, lots of decisions and so on.  In particular I'm aiming at apps
 where you need to be very confident about exactly what is happening,
 so very strict control of actions, being careful of multiple
 renderings of a page each trying to change the server data, and so on.
  Also, I'm wondering about some options for declarative building of
 workflows out of existing tasks.

 My current design involves running from a special page, which
 maintains a stack of tasks.  One type of task is a Workflow, which can
 be configured to automatically spawn subtasks as required, based on
 the result of previous tasks.  Another type of task is based on a
 panel, and is able to cause itself to be rendered.  The stack
 processor makes sure that each task is invoked at the right time, that
 a task can render if it is at the top of the stack, that only the top
 of the stack can be invoked from a form and so on.

 This is working ok for some silly demo cases, but there are various
 issues.  For example, any task that is not also a component cannot
 access dependency injection, or set error messages and so on.  I'm not
 sure how to get around this at the moment, as I don't want to force
 every task to be a component, when many will likely have no cause to
 ever be rendered.

 So, the reason I'm posting is to ask mainly two things:

 1) Is this of interest to anyone else?  All the code is my own, so
 I'll open source it if there seems to be some future in it.

 2) If so, does anyone have any comments on my current design?  Clearly
 there are problems with it, but should I carry on trying to find ways
 to work around them, or does the whole thing sounds like so much
 crack?

 Thanks,

 --
 Phil Housley

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Re: Large internet rich UI Wicket websites?

2009-07-02 Thread Randy S.
For what it's worth, my employer is a large financial services organization
and we are considering switching to Wicket for all our major internal and
external development. I also have been disappointed while going through the
Wiki page that lists sites using Wicket. Many are not even in existence
anymore, and I saw no high volume sites.

This is not a complaint to anyone. Wicket is what it is, including the
community. My point is that despite the lack of (advertised) usage on high
volume sites, some of us are lurking and see lots of potential.

On Jul 2, 2009 2:16 PM, David Chang david_q_zh...@yahoo.com wrote:


Igor, thanks very much for your input and insight. I really mean it.

All the best.


--- On Thu, 7/2/09, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com wrote:

 From: Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com

 Subject: Re: Large internet rich UI Wicket websites?  To:
users@wicket.apache.org
 Date: Thursday, July 2, 2009, 2:35 PM

 lets say the entire backend of amazon  is written in wicket. would you 
consider that to be a la...


Re: Wicket pages as plugin

2009-03-03 Thread Randy S.
Hi all. I am evaluating Wicket for our company and also have the same
question.

There are cases when iframes work just fine (even better), but other cases
when an in-DOM solution is needed. For example, if the app needs to display
something like a fly-out or simulated pop-up outside the screen space of the
app, the boundary of the iframe prevents such UI elements from going outside
the iframe.

Naturally, apps running in such a way would have constraints because they're
sharing the DOM, JS and CSS with other apps (e.g., like a portal page). But
it would add flexibility to Wicket.

-Randy S.

On Mar 3, 2009 7:49 AM, S├ębastien Piller pi...@hmcrecord.ch wrote:

We use iframes for that. It works quite well.

Stefan Lindner wrote:   Dear wicket users and wizzards!   Is ist
possible to use wicket to imp...


Re: Wicket pages as plugin

2009-03-03 Thread Randy S.
Thanks Igor. I guess the trick would be knowing what is safe to filter out
without breaking Wicket. I'll look into this filter.

On Mar 3, 2009 5:15 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com wrote:

you can use iresponsefilter to strip whatever you want from the generated
html.

-igor

On Tue, Mar 3, 2009 at 3:11 PM, Randy S. randypo...@gmail.com wrote:  Hi
all. I am evaluating Wi...

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