Is there a Wicket for Client-side Javascript Apps?

2013-08-30 Thread Ashley Aitken

Sorry, this may be a bit off-topic but I can't think of a better group to ask.

Does anyone know of a client-side Javascript framework that has the complete 
separation of Java(script) and HTML/CSS that Wicket has?  I'm not a fan of 
loops and conditionals in the HTML.

I'm thinking of a client-side Javascript framework that would do similar to 
what Wicket does with the wicketid.  Of course, not being a server-side Web 
application it would be very different in other regards to Wicket.  

I would like it to be component-based and event-driven (like Wicket but in 
Javascript).  Perhaps allowing components to be as easily defined by 
inheritance in Javascript as they are in Wicket, for example.

I don't wish to hide the HTML/CSS.  I would like to be able to design the 
client page(s) in HTML and CSS like Wicket allows, with almost complete 
separation between developer and designer.

Does it even make sense what I am asking for / suggesting? ;-)

Thanks for any pointers or suggestions.

Cheers,
Ashley.

PS I know of Ember.js (uses templating system), Sproutcore, Cappuccino 
(abstracts HTML/CSS) and Flight.

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Re: Is there a Wicket for Client-side Javascript Apps?

2013-08-30 Thread Ashley Aitken

Very interesting.  

Thanks Martin.

Cheers,
Ashley.


On 30/08/2013, at 4:01 PM, Martin Grigorov mgrigo...@apache.org wrote:

 Hi,
 
 Check Cajeta.js.
 Demo app at:
 https://github.com/jklappenbach/cajeta.js/tree/master/quickstart/site
 
 
 
 On Fri, Aug 30, 2013 at 9:17 AM, Ashley Aitken mrhat...@mac.com wrote:
 
 
 Sorry, this may be a bit off-topic but I can't think of a better group to
 ask.
 
 Does anyone know of a client-side Javascript framework that has the
 complete separation of Java(script) and HTML/CSS that Wicket has?  I'm not
 a fan of loops and conditionals in the HTML.
 
 I'm thinking of a client-side Javascript framework that would do similar
 to what Wicket does with the wicketid.  Of course, not being a server-side
 Web application it would be very different in other regards to Wicket.
 
 I would like it to be component-based and event-driven (like Wicket but in
 Javascript).  Perhaps allowing components to be as easily defined by
 inheritance in Javascript as they are in Wicket, for example.
 
 I don't wish to hide the HTML/CSS.  I would like to be able to design the
 client page(s) in HTML and CSS like Wicket allows, with almost complete
 separation between developer and designer.
 
 Does it even make sense what I am asking for / suggesting? ;-)
 
 Thanks for any pointers or suggestions.
 
 Cheers,
 Ashley.
 
 PS I know of Ember.js (uses templating system), Sproutcore, Cappuccino
 (abstracts HTML/CSS) and Flight.
 
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Groovy 1.7 released with ...

2009-12-22 Thread Ashley Aitken


Hi All,

FYI.

Groovy 1.7 has just been released with support for Anonymous Inner  
Classes and Nested Classes (as well as other new features and  
enhancements).


For those interested in using Groovy with Wicket this should make  
things doable now and perhaps simpler than regular Java.


http://docs.codehaus.org/display/GROOVY/Groovy+1.7+release+notes

Cheers,
Ashley.

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Re: Groovy 1.7 released with ...

2009-12-22 Thread Ashley Aitken


Hi Nino (et al.),

I'm not sure, but I think you are referring to Grails using Wicket  
pages (components) written in Java for the presentation layer.   I am  
not talking about Grails.


There have been a couple of projects / attempts to use Groovy to write  
Wicket components and applications but they have been difficult  
because Wicket uses Anonymous Inner Classes a lot, which in the past  
Groovy hasn't supported.


Groovy in general can easily use Java classes (and thus Wicket and  
Java libraries).  This new release means, I believe, its now  
possible / easy  to write a complete Wicket application using the  
Groovy language.


Someone please correct me if I am wrong (which could be quite likely).

Cheers,
Ashley.


On 23/12/2009, at 1:52 AM, nino martinez wael wrote:

AFAIK wicket and Groovy has been possible with grails for a loong  
time..


2009/12/22 Ashley Aitken mrhat...@mac.com:


Hi All,

FYI.

Groovy 1.7 has just been released with support for Anonymous Inner  
Classes

and Nested Classes (as well as other new features and enhancements).

For those interested in using Groovy with Wicket this should make  
things

doable now and perhaps simpler than regular Java.

http://docs.codehaus.org/display/GROOVY/Groovy+1.7+release+notes

Cheers,
Ashley.

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Re: General questions regarding Wicket roadmap and plans

2009-12-03 Thread Ashley Aitken


On 02/12/2009, at 10:45 AM, Igor Vaynberg wrote:


but as you will see, there is not much
demand for precanned components out there, they are just too easy to
roll yourself and there are a lot of open source ones that you can at
least get ideas from for your specific requirements.


But isn't that missing some of the major reasons for using components:

1. that you shouldn't have to reinvent the wheel (even if it is easy),
2. that a component that is tried and tested (version 3+) is better  
than my version 1,

3. components can encapsulate best practice that takes time to learn,
4.  a suite of components may integrate better.

Writing a linked list in Java is easy but I would never consider doing  
that, the available classe are much more powerful, general, well- 
tested, integrated, ...


I'm not knowledgeable wrt Wicket components or JSF components, but  
generally speaking what components available in JSF, for example,  
wouldn't be useful in Wicket and why not?


I'm with the OP in that I'm a little surprised by the lack of  
published components (from low-level to high-level).  Again, I am  
probably missing something ...


Maybe as I learn more about Wicket and get more experience I will  
understand.


Cheers,
Ashley.

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Re: Autogenerating HTML files ...?

2009-11-10 Thread Ashley Aitken


Thanks All.

Igor - I'm a Wicket newbie.  When I get more experience I'll see if I  
can do something along the lines you suggest.  For now I just wished  
to know if it would be possible / sensible.


Casper - Sorry I'm a Wicket newbie as well (but I do have experience  
with some other Web frameworks and will have a go sometime when I  
understand Wicket better).


Frido - Unfortunately, I don't think that is what I am looking for -  
I'm not looking for the rendered page, but rather what the bare source  
page / component HTML would look like.


Cheers,
Ashley.


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Re: Scala, dependency injection and wicket

2009-11-10 Thread Ashley Aitken


On 08/10/2009, at 4:42 AM, Alex Rass wrote:


 And so far: ajax is a pain in the ass that
requires explicit work even for a simple form verification (bad  
architecture

there).


Is this true?

One of my attractions to Wicket was that, hopefully, AJAX was easy (or  
at least easier) than other frameworks.



And this other problem with url formation.


What is that problem exactly?

Thanks,
Ashley.

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Autogenerating HTML files ...?

2009-11-09 Thread Ashley Aitken


Dear All,

I have seen a feature in Wicket Bench (I think it is) that can  
automatically generate the Web component object construction hierarchy  
for a given Web form with Wicket ids.  It's a neat feature.  However,  
I am wondering if it would be possible to do the reverse.


Could Wicket classes be extended to automatically generate the HTML  
file (based on the Wicket object hierarchy) if the HTML file doesn't  
already exist?  Obviously, it couldn't generate the non-dynamic HTML  
aspects of a Web page, but at least it could provide a skeleton page?


This could be configured to overwrite (or not) existing files each  
time the code changed. Perhaps it could be configured to include (for  
debugging purposes) some Wicket information for each item in the page  
(almost like a RAD solution but the intention is not for RAD).


Perhaps it could even use a form of the generation gap pattern by  
putting each dynamic chunk into a separate HTML file and then #include  
them into a main HTML file which it doesn't get overwritten.  Though  
I'm not sure how this would exactly work ...


I've seen Wicket RAD and Wicket Web Beans but these are not what I am  
thinking about.  Eventually, I would want a graphics / Web designer to  
complete the page around the skeleton dynamic HTML parts (that perhaps  
Wicket has autogenerated).


I know this would never be the full solution but it may allow one to  
concentrate just on the Java code and not even have to worry about the  
HTML to start with.  I think it could be an interesting approach.  Is  
this possible? Has this already been done?


Any comments appreciate.

Cheers,
Ashley.


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Wicket HTML before graphics design with CSS ...

2009-10-27 Thread Ashley Aitken


Hi All,

Just a quick question.

Can someone please provide some pointers to Wicket-specific or general  
CSS information on how best to produce Web pages (dynamic pages  
generated with Wicket) that a graphics designer can then come in and  
produce appropriate graphics and CSS style sheets for?


I would like to be able to write a Wicket app before the graphic  
design and detailed layout of the site is done. Of course, some  
hierarchical organisation of content will be specified but exact  
locations of items will not. I'm assuming I'd just use lots of divs  
and CSS classes or similar?


I'm no expert in CSS but I've seen what pages look like when a CSS  
style sheet is missing and assume I will be generating something like  
that with Wicket.  In this case, I guess I could just generate the  
HTML files by hand, or would people suggest some I use some tool?


Thanks for any assistance, pointers, suggestions.

Cheers,
Ashley.


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Re: Wicket HTML before graphics design with CSS ...

2009-10-27 Thread Ashley Aitken


Thanks Martin and John.

I realise that most projects start with Web/GUI storyboards and  
perhaps even fully graphically designed pages and then add the dynamic  
stuff.  However, I think my situation is somewhat the reverse. I want  
to design the logical interface myself, header, footers, navigation,  
and page contents, the hierarchy of contents including any text, but  
then have the graphic designer make it beautiful.


I'm hoping to make it possible for them to do this with a CSS file,  
and some images (logos, buttons, etc.) I am wishing to know what I can  
do in the HTML pages I construct to make this most possible, easy,  
efficient etc. I don't mind the fact that when I am developing the app  
my pages will not look right, hopefully they will be logically clear,  
in fact I would prefer that, so I can focus on the logical interface  
rather than design specifics.


As I mentioned, I think of it as creating the pages but leaving the  
CSS file empty (or at most some basic default).  Does that make  
sense?  Sorry if I am not explaining myself clearly.


Thanks,
Ashley.

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Re: Wicket HTML before graphics design with CSS ...

2009-10-27 Thread Ashley Aitken


Thank you all.

So it seems what I am trying to do is not completely impractical.

Perhaps though I could let them edit the HTML files as well (as long  
as they maintain the logical / hierarchical structure I guess).  I  
just wanted to make it easier for them to do things consistently  
(across pages etc.) and thought CSS styles would be the way to go.


Cheers,
Ashley.


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The Wicket difference ...?

2008-09-29 Thread Ashley Aitken


Howdy All,

Just trying to explain to some colleagues how some of Wicket works  
(differently than most other Web frameworks), so please correct me if  
I am wrong.


From my understanding Wicket differs from most other Web frameworks  
in that it doesn't manage the creation of the object graphs  
representing Web pages (it's done simply through the Java new operator  
and composition of objects by the constructors within that super  
hierarchy).


The positive side of this is that it removes the need for Web page  
factories that take strings as arguments to construct the object  
graphs, and thus are not easily refactored within Java IDEs.  The  
negative side of this is that page caching now needs to be done by  
saving the object graph in some form, e.g. directly in the session or  
serialising to a file.


The more common alternative, as mentioned above, is to have some sort  
of factory that manages the construction of the object graphs  
representing Web pages.  As the framework can do this, as needed, it  
doesn't need to cache the entire object graph, it can just save the  
data needed to refill within a Web page.


Of course, this is probably just one difference and may not be the  
most important aspect of Wicket.  It is, however, I believe why Wicket  
needs to have detachable models, so that the large models don't also  
need to be saved.


Apologies in advance for any mistakes or poor communication.  Any  
comments or clarifications?


Cheers,
Ashley.

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Re: Status of Wicket and Groovy?

2008-06-10 Thread Ashley Aitken
 a dynamic language (for RAD).  Something based  
on Groovy (because of its close ties to Java) and Wicket (because of  
its great approach and separation) would be very elegant and powerful.


Cheers,
Ashley.

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Re: Status of Wicket and Groovy?

2008-06-10 Thread Ashley Aitken
 (for RAD).  Something  
based on
Groovy (because of its close ties to Java) and Wicket (because of  
its great

approach and separation) would be very elegant and powerful.


I think it is a matter of building on a framework like Wicket. Why
start over again? The whole idea of components is that you make
something more complex out of simpler parts. And there's really no end
to what you can do with that (within the confines of web applications
obviously).


Yes, I agree.  If using Groovy with Wicket had worked out better I  
would have been quite happy indeed.  I was quite excited when I first  
read about it.


Unfortunately, although there has been some discussion of serialising  
closures on the Groovy mailing lists but I don't believe anything has  
been done about it.


I think I will just stick with plain Java Wicket or Django for the  
time being.


Cheers,
Ashley.

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Status of Wicket and Groovy?

2008-06-07 Thread Ashley Aitken


Howdy All,

There's a question at the end of this long intro:

I've been evaluating and comparing a number of Web frameworks again,  
particularly at this time Wicket (which I have looked at previously  
and tried out) and Django (which I am new to but comes highly  
recommended).


I very much like the way Wicket has a complete (yes, I think complete  
is a good description) separation of the (X)HTML and Java code. It's  
fantastic when you want graphic designers to design the pages (with  
dummy data as well).


I'm over the idea of using a complex template language, even the  
simplified (presentation only) template language used in Django (so I  
don't wish to go near JSF and I'm even a little negative on Tapestry  
which has a similar minimal template language).


Django on the other hand use the dynamic language Python which makes  
writing apps easier (and shorter). It also seems to make it very easy  
to create more powerful applications by combining smaller  
applications (e.g. it includes a powerful automatic CRUD interface).


I know Wicket makes it very easy to develop components and there are  
some component libraries (e.g. Wicket Stuff) but it doesn't seem like  
there are as many (high level components) as Django or that they are  
as easy to integrate (that's just my perception).


So when I was looking at the Wikipedia comparison on Web frameworks I  
noticed something. There doesn't seem to be a pull (component-based)  
Web framework that uses a dynamic programming language (like Groovy,  
Ruby or Python).  Grok seems too left field.


Django, RoR and Grails are all push (request-based) Web frameworks  
and, as I mentioned above, use template languages to varying degrees.   
So I was thinking a pull (component-based) Web framework like Wicket  
but using a dynamic language could be a great move.


A quick Google showed me that some work has been done with Groovy  
(wicket-contrib-groovy) and the WicketBuilder by Kevin Galligan.   
However, Kevin seems to have moved on to Seam and wicket-contrib- 
groovy seems to be no longer supported.


From what I saw of WicketBuilder it seems it has a lot of potential  
to make Wicket development more dynamic (with the  
GroovyClassResolver), reduce the code required to write Wicket  
applications, and even make them clearer with no overhead when deployed.


So my question is: what is the status (now and going forward) with  
regards to using Groovy to develop with Wicket?  I know there has been  
much discussion of generifying Wicket but perhaps moving to a dynamic  
language could be an alternative future.


Of course, using Groovy with Wicket wouldn't require the framework  
itself to be implemented in Groovy or even that everyone uses Groovy.   
And, as you all probably know Groovy can easily call an Java class  
library.


So what do people think about Groovy and Wicket?

Cheers,
Ashley.

Some relevant URLs:

http://wicketstuff.org/confluence/display/STUFFWIKI/WicketBuilder
http://www.kgalligan.com/wicketgroovy-setup
http://www.kgalligan.com/wicketgroovy-simplepage
http://bigheadco.blogspot.com/2007/03/wicket-and-groovy.html
http://people.byte-code.com/dpanelli/2008/02/04/groovy-wicket/

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