Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-19 Thread Ceki Gulcu

Hi Martin,

The System.out.println() calls are superfluous and will be removed in future 
releases of Mistletoe. They might be replaced by logger call if and when 
appropriate.


Your comment about the manual is duly noted. I'll try to put together something 
more polished the next time.


Cheers,

Martin Grigorov wrote:

It is little strange that _your_ (I emphasize here) software uses
System.out.println() for logging instead of any of the logging
frameworks you created ;-)


From the manual on the page it is not very clear how to setup the whole

thing. Probably I could manage it but it would be good to add step by
step howto for the newbies. 




--
Ceki Gülcü
Logback: The reliable, generic, fast and flexible logging framework for Java.
http://logback.qos.ch

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-17 Thread ralf . eichinger
added it to  
http://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/WICKET/Websites+based+on+Wicket


Quoting Pedro Santos pedros...@gmail.com:


Nice site, it was deployed in development mode and has a nice performance :)

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:16 PM, Vytautas Racelis turi...@gmail.com wrote:


Hi,
i've been working with Wicket for a while.
It is not my primary job, but i've implemented some ideas at
http://www.xaloon.org/blog such as:
* enhanced @MountPage annotation in order to generate sitemap.xml for
google, dynamic menu with spring security
* VirtualPageFactory - to mount panels as pages
* other additional stuff
Currently i am working on open source sports betting component:

http://www.xaloon.org/blog/xaloon-sports-betting-open-source-sports-component-for-apache-wicket
First release may be found at http://www.leenle.com

Since it is my first email to this group this might sound like introduction
of myself :)




Dave B wrote:


Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave




--
Regards,
Vytautas Racelis
---
phone:+370-600-34389
e-mail: turi...@gmail.com
www.xaloon.org
www.leenle.com



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--
Pedro Henrique Oliveira dos Santos






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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-17 Thread ralf . eichinger

added mistletoe to
http://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/WICKET/Related+Projects+and+Tools

Quoting Ceki Gulcu c...@qos.ch:



When I wrote:  it is possible to create a web-application quickly  
and cleanly, I meant to say that was possible to create a  
web-application quickly and cleanly *with* *Wicket*.


Ceki Gulcu wrote:


I started working with Wicket just a week ago in order to develop a
junit extension for integration testing called Mistletoe. See
http://mistletoe.qos.ch for details.

Mistletoe's design imposes a strict separation between the data-model
layer and the presentation layer. I am mentioning this because after
designing the data-later, I started writing the presentation layer
using Wicket. It's was a very pleasant experience. Wicket just clicked
in my mind. By the way, wicket encouraged me to re-design my
data-model slightly and I am quite happy with the results. *After* the
wicket implementation, I did a simpler implementation of the
presentation later using servlets (without any .jsp files).  Given the
experience of the wicket-based implementation, the servlet-based
version was pretty straightforward, thanks to wicket's component-based
architecture.

For small projects, I now know for certain that it is possible to
create a web-application quickly and cleanly. I do not have experience
with larger projects.

Dave B wrote:

Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave



--
Ceki Gülcü
Logback: The reliable, generic, fast and flexible logging framework for Java.
http://logback.qos.ch

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-17 Thread Martin Grigorov
It is little strange that _your_ (I emphasize here) software uses
System.out.println() for logging instead of any of the logging
frameworks you created ;-)

From the manual on the page it is not very clear how to setup the whole
thing. Probably I could manage it but it would be good to add step by
step howto for the newbies. 

El vie, 16-10-2009 a las 20:42 +0200, Ceki Gulcu escribió:
 I started working with Wicket just a week ago in order to develop a
 junit extension for integration testing called Mistletoe. See
 http://mistletoe.qos.ch for details.
 
 Mistletoe's design imposes a strict separation between the data-model
 layer and the presentation layer. I am mentioning this because after
 designing the data-later, I started writing the presentation layer
 using Wicket. It's was a very pleasant experience. Wicket just clicked
 in my mind. By the way, wicket encouraged me to re-design my
 data-model slightly and I am quite happy with the results. *After* the
 wicket implementation, I did a simpler implementation of the
 presentation later using servlets (without any .jsp files).  Given the
 experience of the wicket-based implementation, the servlet-based
 version was pretty straightforward, thanks to wicket's component-based
 architecture.
 
 For small projects, I now know for certain that it is possible to
 create a web-application quickly and cleanly. I do not have experience
 with larger projects.
 
 Dave B wrote:
  Hi,
  
  I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
  that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
  
  I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
  posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
  reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
  Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
  Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
  
  Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
  peruse the source code?
  
  Many thanks,
  Dave
  


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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Daniel Frisk

Pushing definitely is more performance efficient - you know exactly
when and where you push it and it's easy (happy-day-scenario) to
optimize. Partly the ease of optimization results from difficulty of
making complex relations.


I would expect push to put more load on your servers due to
serializing to second level cache, and getting a page back from that
cache might also be more expensive. Of course, it depends where you
pull from. And then when you're within one request, you probably have
that data you'd push already in memory (e.g. Hibernate's session cache
if you use that), so it might not be more expensive in that sense
either. I do agree that pull models can lead to more complex
structures, but that also depends on what kind of models you use (e.g.
reflection based models actually can save code, but obviously using
lots of anonymous classes won't). :-)

Eelco




A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is to  
roll your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the  
request. The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or  
whatever that you would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that  
just stores the type and id when serialized. When/if the page is later  
deserialized you get the entity fresh from your object repository  
(cache).


Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the  
benefits of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have  
communicated this idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it,  
I'm actually surprised :-)


// Daniel
jalbum.net


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Automatic detaching during serialization (was Re: Open Source projects using Wicket)

2009-10-16 Thread Martijn Dashorst
On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 9:00 AM, Daniel Frisk dan...@jalbum.net wrote:
 A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is to roll
 your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the request.
 The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or whatever that you
 would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that just stores the type and
 id when serialized. When/if the page is later deserialized you get the
 entity fresh from your object repository (cache).

 Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the benefits
 of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have communicated this
 idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it, I'm actually surprised :-)

I've proposed such a solution but someone (I believe Matej) told me
that there would be gremlins in the order of the models that get
detached/replaced etc.

Martijn

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Igor Vaynberg
probably because serialization is not guaranteed. you can use a http
session store on a single node cluster and never have anything
serialized.

-igor

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 12:00 AM, Daniel Frisk dan...@jalbum.net wrote:
 Pushing definitely is more performance efficient - you know exactly
 when and where you push it and it's easy (happy-day-scenario) to
 optimize. Partly the ease of optimization results from difficulty of
 making complex relations.

 I would expect push to put more load on your servers due to
 serializing to second level cache, and getting a page back from that
 cache might also be more expensive. Of course, it depends where you
 pull from. And then when you're within one request, you probably have
 that data you'd push already in memory (e.g. Hibernate's session cache
 if you use that), so it might not be more expensive in that sense
 either. I do agree that pull models can lead to more complex
 structures, but that also depends on what kind of models you use (e.g.
 reflection based models actually can save code, but obviously using
 lots of anonymous classes won't). :-)

 Eelco



 A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is to roll
 your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the request.
 The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or whatever that you
 would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that just stores the type and
 id when serialized. When/if the page is later deserialized you get the
 entity fresh from your object repository (cache).

 Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the benefits
 of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have communicated this
 idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it, I'm actually surprised :-)

 // Daniel
 jalbum.net


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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Daniel Frisk
Of course, serialization isn't always necessary but in this case the  
idea was to _enforce_ serialization.


The cost of serialization compared to the actual page construction  
time (often with database accesses and such) seems to often be very  
small. Scalability is the same as for using explicit LDMs in your  
code. Once you have set it up you can never forget to detach stuff  
and end up with an overstuffed session. You don't have to serialize to  
disk either you can keep the data in memory or in your Terracotta  
cluster or whatever.


I think it has clear advantages to explicit model proxies. Models  
proxies are still necessary in some cases, but usually you can just  
put an entity in your component and it will work as if you had used  
LDMs.


I'm not saying this is a golden... But it's a really nice alternative  
in many cases.


// Daniel
jalbum.net



probably because serialization is not guaranteed. you can use a http
session store on a single node cluster and never have anything
serialized.

-igor



A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is  
to roll
your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the  
request.
The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or whatever  
that you
would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that just stores the  
type and
id when serialized. When/if the page is later deserialized you get  
the

entity fresh from your object repository (cache).

Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the  
benefits
of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have  
communicated this
idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it, I'm actually  
surprised :-)


// Daniel
jalbum.net





Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Thies Edeling
eHour is using Wicket (1.3, not yet migrated to 1.4). Site at 
http://www.ehour.nl/ with the svn repo at

http://svn.te-con.nl/repos/ehour/trunk

Dave B wrote:

Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Swanthe Lindgren
I dont really get what you mean by pushing and pulling models. Could you 
please give me an example? Is creating a component without providing a 
model, relying in the parent page/panel/component's default model 
pushing data?


//Swanthe

Jeremy Thomerson wrote:

Sorry, that was an overly terse statement.  Peter Thomas has put a lot of
work into JTrac, and has done a lot of things that I admire (for instance,
some of his performance testing blog entries, etc).  He is also very helpful
on the mailing list.

The reason I said not to look at it is that when I was using it, I found
that nearly all of the components were created without the use of models -
pushing data into the component rather than making it pull from a model.
While that works fine for a small bug tracker, it would not work well in
most enterprise applications - leading to performance and potentially memory
issues.

It's not that it's bad software - but I've taught enough training classes to
see that one of the most common pitfalls to those new to Wicket is to always
push data into the models.  This works fine in some instances, but is not a
best practice and can lead to a lot of problems later if you don't know what
you're doing.  That's why I said what I did.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 7:29 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

  

Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
Wicket usage.

Thanks,
Dave

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:


Don't look at jtrac.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com
wrote:

  

keeping that in mind,

i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
but works better for cmses.

maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

-igor

On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:


Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects
  

out


there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I
  

know


of a


couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
  

build


on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it
  

would


be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much
  

of


the


code is actually Wicket specific, though.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

  

Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF


project,


that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I


can


peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread nino martinez wael
Daniel do you have any sample code for this. Could be cool with a small
quickstart, you could even use the Iolite for this, and drop it's ldms...

2009/10/16 Daniel Frisk dan...@jalbum.net

 Of course, serialization isn't always necessary but in this case the idea
 was to _enforce_ serialization.

 The cost of serialization compared to the actual page construction time
 (often with database accesses and such) seems to often be very small.
 Scalability is the same as for using explicit LDMs in your code. Once you
 have set it up you can never forget to detach stuff and end up with an
 overstuffed session. You don't have to serialize to disk either you can keep
 the data in memory or in your Terracotta cluster or whatever.

 I think it has clear advantages to explicit model proxies. Models proxies
 are still necessary in some cases, but usually you can just put an entity in
 your component and it will work as if you had used LDMs.

 I'm not saying this is a golden... But it's a really nice alternative in
 many cases.

 // Daniel
 jalbum.net


  probably because serialization is not guaranteed. you can use a http
 session store on a single node cluster and never have anything
 serialized.

 -igor


 A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is to roll
 your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the
 request.
 The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or whatever that
 you
 would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that just stores the type
 and
 id when serialized. When/if the page is later deserialized you get the
 entity fresh from your object repository (cache).

 Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the
 benefits
 of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have communicated
 this
 idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it, I'm actually surprised
 :-)

 // Daniel
 jalbum.net





Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Anton Veretennikov
Nice app!

If http://www.ehour.nl/ is written using Wicket itself, I see the same
strange ;jsessionid= added to all pages after I upgraded to 1.4.
while navigating and it does not remove. And google started to contain
all links with this attribute. Does anybody knows what's the promlem
is?

-- Tony

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:11 PM, Thies Edeling tedel...@gmail.com wrote:
 eHour is using Wicket (1.3, not yet migrated to 1.4). Site at
 http://www.ehour.nl/ with the svn repo at
 http://svn.te-con.nl/repos/ehour/trunk

 Dave B wrote:

 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread nino martinez wael
It's the servlet container reverting to url rewrite since it cannot set the
session cookie..

2009/10/16 Anton Veretennikov anton.veretenni...@gmail.com

 Nice app!

 If http://www.ehour.nl/ is written using Wicket itself, I see the same
 strange ;jsessionid= added to all pages after I upgraded to 1.4.
 while navigating and it does not remove. And google started to contain
 all links with this attribute. Does anybody knows what's the promlem
 is?

 -- Tony

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:11 PM, Thies Edeling tedel...@gmail.com wrote:
  eHour is using Wicket (1.3, not yet migrated to 1.4). Site at
  http://www.ehour.nl/ with the svn repo at
  http://svn.te-con.nl/repos/ehour/trunk
 
  Dave B wrote:
 
  Hi,
 
  I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
  that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
 
  I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
  posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
  reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
  Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
  Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
 
  Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
  peruse the source code?
 
  Many thanks,
  Dave
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Anton Veretennikov
I can't understand what do you mean, Nino?
Cookies are set, I see them in browser.

-- Tony

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 6:04 PM, nino martinez wael
nino.martinez.w...@gmail.com wrote:
 It's the servlet container reverting to url rewrite since it cannot set the
 session cookie..

 2009/10/16 Anton Veretennikov anton.veretenni...@gmail.com

 Nice app!

 If http://www.ehour.nl/ is written using Wicket itself, I see the same
 strange ;jsessionid= added to all pages after I upgraded to 1.4.
 while navigating and it does not remove. And google started to contain
 all links with this attribute. Does anybody knows what's the promlem
 is?

 -- Tony

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:11 PM, Thies Edeling tedel...@gmail.com wrote:
  eHour is using Wicket (1.3, not yet migrated to 1.4). Site at
  http://www.ehour.nl/ with the svn repo at
  http://svn.te-con.nl/repos/ehour/trunk
 
  Dave B wrote:
 
  Hi,
 
  I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
  that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
 
  I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
  posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
  reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
  Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
  Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
 
  Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
  peruse the source code?
 
  Many thanks,
  Dave
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Daniel Frisk
I don't have a prepared sample, but that's a great idea. I will put  
one together (perhaps with Iolite).


// Daniel
jalbum.net


Daniel do you have any sample code for this. Could be cool with a  
small
quickstart, you could even use the Iolite for this, and drop it's  
ldms...


2009/10/16 Daniel Frisk dan...@jalbum.net

Of course, serialization isn't always necessary but in this case  
the idea

was to _enforce_ serialization.

The cost of serialization compared to the actual page construction  
time

(often with database accesses and such) seems to often be very small.
Scalability is the same as for using explicit LDMs in your code.  
Once you
have set it up you can never forget to detach stuff and end up  
with an
overstuffed session. You don't have to serialize to disk either you  
can keep

the data in memory or in your Terracotta cluster or whatever.

I think it has clear advantages to explicit model proxies. Models  
proxies
are still necessary in some cases, but usually you can just put an  
entity in

your component and it will work as if you had used LDMs.

I'm not saying this is a golden... But it's a really nice  
alternative in

many cases.

// Daniel
jalbum.net


probably because serialization is not guaranteed. you can use a http

session store on a single node cluster and never have anything
serialized.

-igor


A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is  
to roll

your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the
request.
The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or  
whatever that

you
would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that just stores  
the type

and
id when serialized. When/if the page is later deserialized you  
get the

entity fresh from your object repository (cache).

Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the
benefits
of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have  
communicated

this
idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it, I'm actually  
surprised

:-)

// Daniel
jalbum.net







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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread t3_chris

Hi Daniel!

Your idea sounds quite reasonable to me. Have you got any demo code?

Regards,
  chriss



Daniel Frisk wrote:
 
 
 A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is to  
 roll your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the  
 request. The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or  
 whatever that you would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that  
 just stores the type and id when serialized. When/if the page is later  
 deserialized you get the entity fresh from your object repository  
 (cache).
 
 Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the  
 benefits of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have  
 communicated this idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it,  
 I'm actually surprised :-)
 
 // Daniel
 jalbum.net
 

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View this message in context: 
http://www.nabble.com/Open-Source-projects-using-Wicket-tp25917713p25923855.html
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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Eelco Hillenius
push:

new Model(myObject), which will keep a reference to the object for the
entire life span of the component

pull:

new LoadableDetachableModel() {
  protected Object load() {
return someService.getItFromSomewhereElse();
  }
}

The difference is that with pull, you need to know the model object
when creating the model, and pass it to that model right then, while
with pull models you rather store the calculation to get a model
object. Examples of the latter are LoadableDetachableModel and
PropertyModel.

Eelco


On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:23 AM, Swanthe Lindgren
swanthe.lindg...@megasol.se wrote:
 I dont really get what you mean by pushing and pulling models. Could you
 please give me an example? Is creating a component without providing a
 model, relying in the parent page/panel/component's default model pushing
 data?

 //Swanthe

 Jeremy Thomerson wrote:

 Sorry, that was an overly terse statement.  Peter Thomas has put a lot of
 work into JTrac, and has done a lot of things that I admire (for instance,
 some of his performance testing blog entries, etc).  He is also very
 helpful
 on the mailing list.

 The reason I said not to look at it is that when I was using it, I found
 that nearly all of the components were created without the use of models -
 pushing data into the component rather than making it pull from a model.
 While that works fine for a small bug tracker, it would not work well in
 most enterprise applications - leading to performance and potentially
 memory
 issues.

 It's not that it's bad software - but I've taught enough training classes
 to
 see that one of the most common pitfalls to those new to Wicket is to
 always
 push data into the models.  This works fine in some instances, but is not
 a
 best practice and can lead to a lot of problems later if you don't know
 what
 you're doing.  That's why I said what I did.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 7:29 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:



 Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
 lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
 Wicket usage.

 Thanks,
 Dave

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:


 Don't look at jtrac.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com
 wrote:



 keeping that in mind,

 i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
 plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
 but works better for cmses.

 maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

 -igor

 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:


 Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects


 out


 there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I


 know


 of a


 couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to


 build


 on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it


 would


 be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

 http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
 committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much


 of


 the


 code is actually Wicket specific, though.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:



 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF


 project,


 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I


 can


 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave

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 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org




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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread nino martinez wael
Are you using a proxy server like apache? Usually when the jsessionid are
appended, it is because the servlet container was unable to set the cookie
then it tries url rewriting.. But it should have nothing todo with wicket
versions..

2009/10/16 Anton Veretennikov anton.veretenni...@gmail.com

 I can't understand what do you mean, Nino?
 Cookies are set, I see them in browser.

 -- Tony

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 6:04 PM, nino martinez wael
 nino.martinez.w...@gmail.com wrote:
  It's the servlet container reverting to url rewrite since it cannot set
 the
  session cookie..
 
  2009/10/16 Anton Veretennikov anton.veretenni...@gmail.com
 
  Nice app!
 
  If http://www.ehour.nl/ is written using Wicket itself, I see the same
  strange ;jsessionid= added to all pages after I upgraded to 1.4.
  while navigating and it does not remove. And google started to contain
  all links with this attribute. Does anybody knows what's the promlem
  is?
 
  -- Tony
 
  On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:11 PM, Thies Edeling tedel...@gmail.com
 wrote:
   eHour is using Wicket (1.3, not yet migrated to 1.4). Site at
   http://www.ehour.nl/ with the svn repo at
   http://svn.te-con.nl/repos/ehour/trunk
  
   Dave B wrote:
  
   Hi,
  
   I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF
 project,
   that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
  
   I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
   posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
   reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
   Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
   Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
  
   Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I
 can
   peruse the source code?
  
   Many thanks,
   Dave
  
   -
   To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
   For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
  
  
  
  
  
   -
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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread nino martinez wael
Mail me if you need some help..

2009/10/16 Daniel Frisk dan...@jalbum.net

 I don't have a prepared sample, but that's a great idea. I will put one
 together (perhaps with Iolite).

 // Daniel
 jalbum.net



  Daniel do you have any sample code for this. Could be cool with a small
 quickstart, you could even use the Iolite for this, and drop it's ldms...

 2009/10/16 Daniel Frisk dan...@jalbum.net

  Of course, serialization isn't always necessary but in this case the idea
 was to _enforce_ serialization.

 The cost of serialization compared to the actual page construction time
 (often with database accesses and such) seems to often be very small.
 Scalability is the same as for using explicit LDMs in your code. Once you
 have set it up you can never forget to detach stuff and end up with an
 overstuffed session. You don't have to serialize to disk either you can
 keep
 the data in memory or in your Terracotta cluster or whatever.

 I think it has clear advantages to explicit model proxies. Models proxies
 are still necessary in some cases, but usually you can just put an entity
 in
 your component and it will work as if you had used LDMs.

 I'm not saying this is a golden... But it's a really nice alternative in
 many cases.

 // Daniel
 jalbum.net


 probably because serialization is not guaranteed. you can use a http

 session store on a single node cluster and never have anything
 serialized.

 -igor


  A third option, which from my POV is perhaps the most elegant, is to
 roll
 your own page store that serializes the pages instantly after the
 request.
 The serialization have special hooks to replace entites or whatever
 that
 you
 would prefer to have as LDM with a placeholder that just stores the
 type
 and
 id when serialized. When/if the page is later deserialized you get the
 entity fresh from your object repository (cache).

 Why is this elegant? You get the programming model of push with the
 benefits
 of pull without writing any code for model proxies. I have communicated
 this
 idea before but nobody but me seems to prefer it, I'm actually
 surprised
 :-)

 // Daniel
 jalbum.net





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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Ceki Gulcu


I started working with Wicket just a week ago in order to develop a
junit extension for integration testing called Mistletoe. See
http://mistletoe.qos.ch for details.

Mistletoe's design imposes a strict separation between the data-model
layer and the presentation layer. I am mentioning this because after
designing the data-later, I started writing the presentation layer
using Wicket. It's was a very pleasant experience. Wicket just clicked
in my mind. By the way, wicket encouraged me to re-design my
data-model slightly and I am quite happy with the results. *After* the
wicket implementation, I did a simpler implementation of the
presentation later using servlets (without any .jsp files).  Given the
experience of the wicket-based implementation, the servlet-based
version was pretty straightforward, thanks to wicket's component-based
architecture.

For small projects, I now know for certain that it is possible to
create a web-application quickly and cleanly. I do not have experience
with larger projects.

Dave B wrote:

Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave


--
Ceki Gülcü
Logback: The reliable, generic, fast and flexible logging framework for Java.
http://logback.qos.ch

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Ceki Gulcu


When I wrote:  it is possible to create a web-application quickly and cleanly, 
I meant to say that was possible to create a web-application quickly and cleanly 
*with* *Wicket*.


Ceki Gulcu wrote:


I started working with Wicket just a week ago in order to develop a
junit extension for integration testing called Mistletoe. See
http://mistletoe.qos.ch for details.

Mistletoe's design imposes a strict separation between the data-model
layer and the presentation layer. I am mentioning this because after
designing the data-later, I started writing the presentation layer
using Wicket. It's was a very pleasant experience. Wicket just clicked
in my mind. By the way, wicket encouraged me to re-design my
data-model slightly and I am quite happy with the results. *After* the
wicket implementation, I did a simpler implementation of the
presentation later using servlets (without any .jsp files).  Given the
experience of the wicket-based implementation, the servlet-based
version was pretty straightforward, thanks to wicket's component-based
architecture.

For small projects, I now know for certain that it is possible to
create a web-application quickly and cleanly. I do not have experience
with larger projects.

Dave B wrote:

Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave



--
Ceki Gülcü
Logback: The reliable, generic, fast and flexible logging framework for Java.
http://logback.qos.ch

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Vytautas Racelis

Hi,
i've been working with Wicket for a while.
It is not my primary job, but i've implemented some ideas at  
http://www.xaloon.org/blog such as:
* enhanced @MountPage annotation in order to generate sitemap.xml for 
google, dynamic menu with spring security

* VirtualPageFactory - to mount panels as pages
* other additional stuff
Currently i am working on open source sports betting component:
http://www.xaloon.org/blog/xaloon-sports-betting-open-source-sports-component-for-apache-wicket
First release may be found at http://www.leenle.com

Since it is my first email to this group this might sound like 
introduction of myself :)



Dave B wrote:

Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave




--
Regards,
Vytautas Racelis
---
phone:+370-600-34389
e-mail: turi...@gmail.com
www.xaloon.org
www.leenle.com


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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-16 Thread Pedro Santos
Nice site, it was deployed in development mode and has a nice performance :)

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 5:16 PM, Vytautas Racelis turi...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hi,
 i've been working with Wicket for a while.
 It is not my primary job, but i've implemented some ideas at
 http://www.xaloon.org/blog such as:
 * enhanced @MountPage annotation in order to generate sitemap.xml for
 google, dynamic menu with spring security
 * VirtualPageFactory - to mount panels as pages
 * other additional stuff
 Currently i am working on open source sports betting component:

 http://www.xaloon.org/blog/xaloon-sports-betting-open-source-sports-component-for-apache-wicket
 First release may be found at http://www.leenle.com

 Since it is my first email to this group this might sound like introduction
 of myself :)



 Dave B wrote:

 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave



 --
 Regards,
 Vytautas Racelis
 ---
 phone:+370-600-34389
 e-mail: turi...@gmail.com
 www.xaloon.org
 www.leenle.com



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-- 
Pedro Henrique Oliveira dos Santos


Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Dave B
Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Jeremy Thomerson
Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects out
there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I know of a
couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to build
on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it would
be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much of the
code is actually Wicket specific, though.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org




Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Igor Vaynberg
keeping that in mind,

i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
but works better for cmses.

maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

-igor

On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
 Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects out
 there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I know of a
 couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to build
 on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it would
 be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

 http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
 committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much of the
 code is actually Wicket specific, though.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org




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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Jeremy Thomerson
Don't look at jtrac.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.comwrote:

 keeping that in mind,

 i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
 plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
 but works better for cmses.

 maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

 -igor

 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
  Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects
 out
  there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I know
 of a
  couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
 build
  on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it
 would
  be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.
 
  http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
  committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much of
 the
  code is actually Wicket specific, though.
 
  --
  Jeremy Thomerson
  http://www.wickettraining.com
 
 
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:
 
  Hi,
 
  I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
  that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
 
  I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
  posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
  reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
  Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
  Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
 
  Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
  peruse the source code?
 
  Many thanks,
  Dave
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 
 

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Ralf Eichinger

see here:
http://cwiki.apache.org/WICKET/products-based-on-wicket.html

Igor Vaynberg wrote:

keeping that in mind,

i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
but works better for cmses.

maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

-igor

On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
  

Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects out
there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I know of a
couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to build
on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it would
be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much of the
code is actually Wicket specific, though.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:



Hi,

I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
peruse the source code?

Many thanks,
Dave

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Dave B
Great, thanks Ralf.

That'll give me plenty of stuff to digest.

I'm not against looking at bad Wicket usage either, I don't need to
see just best practices. The pitfalls of Wicket used in the wild are
also interesting.

I'm largely sold on the premise of Wicket, though I'd be concerned if
you guys advised that too many of these open source projects were poor
representations -- if it's too hard for an average developer to write
decent Wicket code, then that's a red flag for sure. (Not trying to
troll with that statement, but I'd expect more 'good' projects than
'bad'.)

Thanks again,
Dave




On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Ralf Eichinger
ralf.eichin...@pixotec.de wrote:
 see here:
 http://cwiki.apache.org/WICKET/products-based-on-wicket.html

 Igor Vaynberg wrote:

 keeping that in mind,

 i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
 plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
 but works better for cmses.

 maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

 -igor

 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:


 Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects
 out
 there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I know
 of a
 couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
 build
 on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it
 would
 be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

 http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
 committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much of
 the
 code is actually Wicket specific, though.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:



 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org




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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Dave B
Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
Wicket usage.

Thanks,
Dave

On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
 Don't look at jtrac.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.comwrote:

 keeping that in mind,

 i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
 plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
 but works better for cmses.

 maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...

 -igor

 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
  Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects
 out
  there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I know
 of a
  couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
 build
  on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it
 would
  be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.
 
  http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
  committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much of
 the
  code is actually Wicket specific, though.
 
  --
  Jeremy Thomerson
  http://www.wickettraining.com
 
 
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:
 
  Hi,
 
  I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF project,
  that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
 
  I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
  posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
  reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
  Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
  Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
 
  Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I can
  peruse the source code?
 
  Many thanks,
  Dave
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 
 

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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Jeremy Thomerson
Sorry, that was an overly terse statement.  Peter Thomas has put a lot of
work into JTrac, and has done a lot of things that I admire (for instance,
some of his performance testing blog entries, etc).  He is also very helpful
on the mailing list.

The reason I said not to look at it is that when I was using it, I found
that nearly all of the components were created without the use of models -
pushing data into the component rather than making it pull from a model.
While that works fine for a small bug tracker, it would not work well in
most enterprise applications - leading to performance and potentially memory
issues.

It's not that it's bad software - but I've taught enough training classes to
see that one of the most common pitfalls to those new to Wicket is to always
push data into the models.  This works fine in some instances, but is not a
best practice and can lead to a lot of problems later if you don't know what
you're doing.  That's why I said what I did.

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 7:29 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

 Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
 lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
 Wicket usage.

 Thanks,
 Dave

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
  Don't look at jtrac.
 
  --
  Jeremy Thomerson
  http://www.wickettraining.com
 
 
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com
 wrote:
 
  keeping that in mind,
 
  i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
  plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
  but works better for cmses.
 
  maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...
 
  -igor
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
  jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
   Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects
  out
   there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I
 know
  of a
   couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
  build
   on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it
  would
   be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.
  
   http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
   committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much
 of
  the
   code is actually Wicket specific, though.
  
   --
   Jeremy Thomerson
   http://www.wickettraining.com
  
  
  
   On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:
  
   Hi,
  
   I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF
 project,
   that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
  
   I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
   posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
   reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
   Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
   Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
  
   Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I
 can
   peruse the source code?
  
   Many thanks,
   Dave
  
   -
   To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
   For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
  
  
  
 
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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Peter Thomas
On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 7:52 AM, Jeremy Thomerson jer...@wickettraining.com
 wrote:

 Sorry, that was an overly terse statement.  Peter Thomas has put a lot of
 work into JTrac, and has done a lot of things that I admire (for instance,
 some of his performance testing blog entries, etc).  He is also very
 helpful
 on the mailing list.

 The reason I said not to look at it is that when I was using it, I found
 that nearly all of the components were created without the use of models -
 pushing data into the component rather than making it pull from a model.
 While that works fine for a small bug tracker, it would not work well in
 most enterprise applications - leading to performance and potentially
 memory
 issues.

 It's not that it's bad software - but I've taught enough training classes
 to
 see that one of the most common pitfalls to those new to Wicket is to
 always
 push data into the models.  This works fine in some instances, but is not a
 best practice and can lead to a lot of problems later if you don't know
 what
 you're doing.  That's why I said what I did.


Agreed.  JTrac was the first ever Wicket project I attempted, ported the UI
over from Spring MVC in a rather short time.  It's not as bad as Jeremy
makes it out to be though (psst: he's a perfectionist and runs a Wicket
training course :P) and I took care to use a detachable model for the
primary ListView.  JTrac also has a perf-test JMeter script checked-in and
users consistently praise the performance.

I guess this means that even Wicket apps created by newbies will end up
performing rather well.  Anyway, here's an open source Wicket application I
did recently, which I dare say demonstrates idiomatic usage of Wicket
models:

http://code.google.com/p/perfbench/


 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 7:29 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

  Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
  lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
  Wicket usage.
 
  Thanks,
  Dave
 
  On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
  jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
   Don't look at jtrac.
  
   --
   Jeremy Thomerson
   http://www.wickettraining.com
  
  
  
   On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg 
 igor.vaynb...@gmail.com
  wrote:
  
   keeping that in mind,
  
   i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
   plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
   but works better for cmses.
  
   maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...
  
   -igor
  
   On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
   jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS
 projects
   out
there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I
  know
   of a
couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
   build
on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that
 it
   would
be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.
   
http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how
 much
  of
   the
code is actually Wicket specific, though.
   
--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com
   
   
   
On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net
 wrote:
   
Hi,
   
I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF
  project,
that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
   
I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to
 see
Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
   
Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I
  can
peruse the source code?
   
Many thanks,
Dave
   
   
 -
To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
   
   
   
  
   -
   To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
   For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
  
  
  
 
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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Martin Makundi
Pushing definitely is more performance efficient - you know exactly
when and where you push it and it's easy (happy-day-scenario) to
optimize. Partly the ease of optimization results from difficulty of
making complex relations.

However, if you pull from models, you might end up with very complex
structures and if you do not have elegant caching mechanisms, the
resulting object tree might take long to traverse in a pull-manner.

Nevertheless, pull is cooler and keeps your code cleaner, so you can
worry about performance later.

**
Martin

2009/10/16 Jeremy Thomerson jer...@wickettraining.com:
 Sorry, that was an overly terse statement.  Peter Thomas has put a lot of
 work into JTrac, and has done a lot of things that I admire (for instance,
 some of his performance testing blog entries, etc).  He is also very helpful
 on the mailing list.

 The reason I said not to look at it is that when I was using it, I found
 that nearly all of the components were created without the use of models -
 pushing data into the component rather than making it pull from a model.
 While that works fine for a small bug tracker, it would not work well in
 most enterprise applications - leading to performance and potentially memory
 issues.

 It's not that it's bad software - but I've taught enough training classes to
 see that one of the most common pitfalls to those new to Wicket is to always
 push data into the models.  This works fine in some instances, but is not a
 best practice and can lead to a lot of problems later if you don't know what
 you're doing.  That's why I said what I did.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 7:29 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:

 Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
 lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
 Wicket usage.

 Thanks,
 Dave

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
 jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
  Don't look at jtrac.
 
  --
  Jeremy Thomerson
  http://www.wickettraining.com
 
 
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg igor.vaynb...@gmail.com
 wrote:
 
  keeping that in mind,
 
  i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do with
  plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
  but works better for cmses.
 
  maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...
 
  -igor
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
  jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
   Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS projects
  out
   there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I
 know
  of a
   couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier to
  build
   on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that it
  would
   be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.
  
   http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the core
   committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how much
 of
  the
   code is actually Wicket specific, though.
  
   --
   Jeremy Thomerson
   http://www.wickettraining.com
  
  
  
   On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:
  
   Hi,
  
   I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF
 project,
   that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)
  
   I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing list
   posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
   reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to see
   Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
   Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.
  
   Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that I
 can
   peruse the source code?
  
   Many thanks,
   Dave
  
   -
   To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
   For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
  
  
  
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 
 

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 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org




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Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Jeremy Thomerson
Thanks Peter for being a good sport and not beating me up for what I said in
a public forum!

And it is certainly a great first project!  I used it to track issues for
multiple clients until I recently changed everything that I have over to
trac (regular trac, not jtrac :) just so that I have some consistency in my
life :)

Best regards, (and are you coming to the London Wicket Event in November?  I
heard that you might.)

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com



On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 10:14 PM, Peter Thomas ptrtho...@gmail.com wrote:

 On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 7:52 AM, Jeremy Thomerson 
 jer...@wickettraining.com
  wrote:

  Sorry, that was an overly terse statement.  Peter Thomas has put a lot of
  work into JTrac, and has done a lot of things that I admire (for
 instance,
  some of his performance testing blog entries, etc).  He is also very
  helpful
  on the mailing list.
 
  The reason I said not to look at it is that when I was using it, I found
  that nearly all of the components were created without the use of models
 -
  pushing data into the component rather than making it pull from a
 model.
  While that works fine for a small bug tracker, it would not work well in
  most enterprise applications - leading to performance and potentially
  memory
  issues.
 
  It's not that it's bad software - but I've taught enough training classes
  to
  see that one of the most common pitfalls to those new to Wicket is to
  always
  push data into the models.  This works fine in some instances, but is not
 a
  best practice and can lead to a lot of problems later if you don't know
  what
  you're doing.  That's why I said what I did.
 
 
 Agreed.  JTrac was the first ever Wicket project I attempted, ported the UI
 over from Spring MVC in a rather short time.  It's not as bad as Jeremy
 makes it out to be though (psst: he's a perfectionist and runs a Wicket
 training course :P) and I took care to use a detachable model for the
 primary ListView.  JTrac also has a perf-test JMeter script checked-in and
 users consistently praise the performance.

 I guess this means that even Wicket apps created by newbies will end up
 performing rather well.  Anyway, here's an open source Wicket application I
 did recently, which I dare say demonstrates idiomatic usage of Wicket
 models:

 http://code.google.com/p/perfbench/


  --
  Jeremy Thomerson
  http://www.wickettraining.com
 
 
 
  On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 7:29 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net wrote:
 
   Any particular reason?  Form a (very) cursory ten minute look, the
   lack of tests was glaring, though not an indictment of the actual
   Wicket usage.
  
   Thanks,
   Dave
  
   On Fri, Oct 16, 2009 at 11:04 AM, Jeremy Thomerson
   jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
Don't look at jtrac.
   
--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com
   
   
   
On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:42 PM, Igor Vaynberg 
  igor.vaynb...@gmail.com
   wrote:
   
keeping that in mind,
   
i wouldnt look at brix, most wicket-related code there has to do
 with
plumbing and implementing a development model that is unlike wicket
but works better for cmses.
   
maybe look at http://www.jtrac.info/ , i think that uses wicket...
   
-igor
   
On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Jeremy Thomerson
jer...@wickettraining.com wrote:
 Beware - just like any other app, OS or not, you will find OS
  projects
out
 there that will teach you all kind of wrong ways to use Wicket.  I
   know
of a
 couple because I tried to use them, thinking they would be easier
 to
build
 on because they used Wicket.  But they were so poorly written that
  it
would
 be a bad place for someone new to the framework to start.

 http://code.google.com/p/brix-cms/ was written by some of the
 core
 committers, so the Wicket code in it will be good.  Not sure how
  much
   of
the
 code is actually Wicket specific, though.

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com



 On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Dave B d...@davebolton.net
  wrote:

 Hi,

 I'm in the process of evaluating Wicket (after an arduous JSF
   project,
 that has made us re-evaluate our web platform.)

 I've read Wicket in Action and whole bunch of blog and mailing
 list
 posts, done some proof-of-concept work and am now interested in
 reading source code from a project using Wicket, since I want to
  see
 Wicket in the wild. I know Artifactory uses Wicket, but their
 Subversion access instructions seem to be out of date.

 Does anyone know of an open source project using Wicket, so that
 I
   can
 peruse the source code?

 Many thanks,
 Dave


  -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: 

Re: Open Source projects using Wicket

2009-10-15 Thread Eelco Hillenius
 Pushing definitely is more performance efficient - you know exactly
 when and where you push it and it's easy (happy-day-scenario) to
 optimize. Partly the ease of optimization results from difficulty of
 making complex relations.

I would expect push to put more load on your servers due to
serializing to second level cache, and getting a page back from that
cache might also be more expensive. Of course, it depends where you
pull from. And then when you're within one request, you probably have
that data you'd push already in memory (e.g. Hibernate's session cache
if you use that), so it might not be more expensive in that sense
either. I do agree that pull models can lead to more complex
structures, but that also depends on what kind of models you use (e.g.
reflection based models actually can save code, but obviously using
lots of anonymous classes won't). :-)

Eelco

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