Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-20 Thread Swanthe Lindgren
We use Aptana plugin for eclipse as html editor. If you dont install the 
full suit its free.


//Swanthe

Eduardo Nunes wrote:

I have just one problem with eclipse, I can't use the HTML formatter,
that's very sucks. I tried tidy but it didn't work too. What do you
use guys to format html code?

On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com wrote:
  

I just wanted to thank Jeremy, Scott, and Linda for recommending Effective
Java. I read through the book this week. It's wonderful -- accessible and
useful. Now I'm in the process of refactoring my project to start applying
the concepts.

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 8:53 AM, Carlo Camerino cmcamer...@gmail.com wrote:



we used to be bugzilla, mediawiki, continuum statck.we moved to Trac. It
was
simply amazing with all those plugins.

Code Review WIth Trac Is Good.
Review Board is also good software but it doesn't suit our programming
needs.

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:38 PM, Matt Welch matt...@welchkin.net wrote:

  

Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):

IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
Source Control - SVN
Build - Maven
Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually purchased


and
  

used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same company


as
  

JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects; not
bad, but not fantastic either)
Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it


than
  

nothing at all, but could be better)


Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial


tools
  

like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for


defect
  

management.

My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.

-Matt


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View this message in context:



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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-20 Thread Vladimir K

I installed it on MyEclipse I didn't find how to format the text. Does it
capable to format text better than WTP does?


Linkan wrote:
 
 We use Aptana plugin for eclipse as html editor. If you dont install the 
 full suit its free.
 
 //Swanthe
 
 Eduardo Nunes wrote:
 I have just one problem with eclipse, I can't use the HTML formatter,
 that's very sucks. I tried tidy but it didn't work too. What do you
 use guys to format html code?

 On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com
 wrote:
   
 I just wanted to thank Jeremy, Scott, and Linda for recommending
 Effective
 Java. I read through the book this week. It's wonderful -- accessible
 and
 useful. Now I'm in the process of refactoring my project to start
 applying
 the concepts.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 8:53 AM, Carlo Camerino cmcamer...@gmail.com
 wrote:

 
 we used to be bugzilla, mediawiki, continuum statck.we moved to Trac.
 It
 was
 simply amazing with all those plugins.

 Code Review WIth Trac Is Good.
 Review Board is also good software but it doesn't suit our programming
 needs.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:38 PM, Matt Welch matt...@welchkin.net
 wrote:

   
 Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):

 IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
 Source Control - SVN
 Build - Maven
 Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
 Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually
 purchased
 
 and
   
 used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same
 company
 
 as
   
 JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
 Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects;
 not
 bad, but not fantastic either)
 Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it
 
 than
   
 nothing at all, but could be better)


 Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial
 
 tools
   
 like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for
 
 defect
   
 management.

 My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.

 -Matt


 --
 View this message in context:

 
 http://www.nabble.com/Tools-for-Managing-a-Wicket-Project-tp23299396p23334970.html
   
 Sent from the Wicket - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

 



   
 
 
 
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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-19 Thread Steve Swinsburg
You can get Eclipse to auto refresh if you modify files externally.  
Check preferences.



cheers,
Steve


On 19/05/2009, at 1:15 AM, John Armstrong wrote:

I always have to do a 'Refresh' when changing the HTML. Its quite  
painful..


I tend to author the bulk of my html in an external editor that is
more suitable to the purpose and fast ( the eclipse validators are
painfully slow, particularly in Javascript intensive pages). Then I
tweak it in Eclipse and hit F5. A Lot.

John-

On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 5:03 PM, pete swulius pswul...@gmail.com  
wrote:
It appears that using external html editors causes sync issues.   
Apparently
eclipse doesn't monitor changes to the file system, except to warn  
you that
it's out of sync.  I would love the know the truth of it as I could  
very

well be missing something obvious.  In fact, I would bet that I am,
considering that eclispe is so cool.

I am currently using the Amateras plugin:
http://amateras.sourceforge.jp/cgi-bin/fswiki_en/wiki.cgi?page=EclipseHTMLEditor 
.
 I have no problems with it, but I use it only for the syntax  
coloring

and
the occasional content assist.

--pete



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smime.p7s
Description: S/MIME cryptographic signature


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-19 Thread Vladimir K

Innate markup formatting in WTP is awful. It splits all tags between lines.
I searched the web but didn't find information how to configure WTP. I
returned back to myeclipse.

How could WTP fans be ok with default formatting?


Eduardo Nunes wrote:
 
 it's very strange, because if I hit ctrl+shift+f in some html code
 with WTP, the source code will be completely unwell formatted. I will
 try amateras plugin, thank you
 
 On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 9:15 PM, John Armstrong siber...@siberian.org
 wrote:
 I always have to do a 'Refresh' when changing the HTML. Its quite
 painful..

 I tend to author the bulk of my html in an external editor that is
 more suitable to the purpose and fast ( the eclipse validators are
 painfully slow, particularly in Javascript intensive pages). Then I
 tweak it in Eclipse and hit F5. A Lot.

 John-

 On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 5:03 PM, pete swulius pswul...@gmail.com wrote:
 It appears that using external html editors causes sync issues.
  Apparently
 eclipse doesn't monitor changes to the file system, except to warn you
 that
 it's out of sync.  I would love the know the truth of it as I could very
 well be missing something obvious.  In fact, I would bet that I am,
 considering that eclispe is so cool.

 I am currently using the Amateras plugin:
 http://amateras.sourceforge.jp/cgi-bin/fswiki_en/wiki.cgi?page=EclipseHTMLEditor.
  I have no problems with it, but I use it only for the syntax coloring
 and
 the occasional content assist.

 --pete


 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org


 
 
 
 -- 
 Eduardo S. Nunes
 http://e-nunes.com.br
 
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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread Dane Laverty
I just wanted to thank Jeremy, Scott, and Linda for recommending Effective
Java. I read through the book this week. It's wonderful -- accessible and
useful. Now I'm in the process of refactoring my project to start applying
the concepts.

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 8:53 AM, Carlo Camerino cmcamer...@gmail.com wrote:

 we used to be bugzilla, mediawiki, continuum statck.we moved to Trac. It
 was
 simply amazing with all those plugins.

 Code Review WIth Trac Is Good.
 Review Board is also good software but it doesn't suit our programming
 needs.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:38 PM, Matt Welch matt...@welchkin.net wrote:

 
  Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):
 
  IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
  Source Control - SVN
  Build - Maven
  Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
  Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually purchased
 and
  used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same company
 as
  JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
  Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects; not
  bad, but not fantastic either)
  Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it
 than
  nothing at all, but could be better)
 
 
  Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial
 tools
  like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for
 defect
  management.
 
  My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.
 
  -Matt
 
 
  --
  View this message in context:
 
 http://www.nabble.com/Tools-for-Managing-a-Wicket-Project-tp23299396p23334970.html
  Sent from the Wicket - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
 



Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread Eduardo Nunes
I have just one problem with eclipse, I can't use the HTML formatter,
that's very sucks. I tried tidy but it didn't work too. What do you
use guys to format html code?

On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com wrote:
 I just wanted to thank Jeremy, Scott, and Linda for recommending Effective
 Java. I read through the book this week. It's wonderful -- accessible and
 useful. Now I'm in the process of refactoring my project to start applying
 the concepts.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 8:53 AM, Carlo Camerino cmcamer...@gmail.com wrote:

 we used to be bugzilla, mediawiki, continuum statck.we moved to Trac. It
 was
 simply amazing with all those plugins.

 Code Review WIth Trac Is Good.
 Review Board is also good software but it doesn't suit our programming
 needs.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:38 PM, Matt Welch matt...@welchkin.net wrote:

 
  Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):
 
  IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
  Source Control - SVN
  Build - Maven
  Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
  Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually purchased
 and
  used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same company
 as
  JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
  Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects; not
  bad, but not fantastic either)
  Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it
 than
  nothing at all, but could be better)
 
 
  Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial
 tools
  like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for
 defect
  management.
 
  My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.
 
  -Matt
 
 
  --
  View this message in context:
 
 http://www.nabble.com/Tools-for-Managing-a-Wicket-Project-tp23299396p23334970.html
  Sent from the Wicket - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
 





-- 
Eduardo S. Nunes
http://e-nunes.com.br

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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread John Armstrong
I use the HTML formatter without problems. What issue are you having?

I use MyEclipse, it may be different?

J

On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 4:47 PM, Eduardo Nunes esnu...@gmail.com wrote:
 I have just one problem with eclipse, I can't use the HTML formatter,
 that's very sucks. I tried tidy but it didn't work too. What do you
 use guys to format html code?

 On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 2:06 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com wrote:
 I just wanted to thank Jeremy, Scott, and Linda for recommending Effective
 Java. I read through the book this week. It's wonderful -- accessible and
 useful. Now I'm in the process of refactoring my project to start applying
 the concepts.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 8:53 AM, Carlo Camerino cmcamer...@gmail.com wrote:

 we used to be bugzilla, mediawiki, continuum statck.we moved to Trac. It
 was
 simply amazing with all those plugins.

 Code Review WIth Trac Is Good.
 Review Board is also good software but it doesn't suit our programming
 needs.

 On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:38 PM, Matt Welch matt...@welchkin.net wrote:

 
  Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):
 
  IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
  Source Control - SVN
  Build - Maven
  Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
  Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually purchased
 and
  used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same company
 as
  JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
  Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects; not
  bad, but not fantastic either)
  Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it
 than
  nothing at all, but could be better)
 
 
  Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial
 tools
  like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for
 defect
  management.
 
  My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.
 
  -Matt
 
 
  --
  View this message in context:
 
 http://www.nabble.com/Tools-for-Managing-a-Wicket-Project-tp23299396p23334970.html
  Sent from the Wicket - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.
 





 --
 Eduardo S. Nunes
 http://e-nunes.com.br

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org



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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread pete swulius
It appears that using external html editors causes sync issues.  Apparently
eclipse doesn't monitor changes to the file system, except to warn you that
it's out of sync.  I would love the know the truth of it as I could very
well be missing something obvious.  In fact, I would bet that I am,
considering that eclispe is so cool.

I am currently using the Amateras plugin:
http://amateras.sourceforge.jp/cgi-bin/fswiki_en/wiki.cgi?page=EclipseHTMLEditor.
 I have no problems with it, but I use it only for the syntax coloring
and
the occasional content assist.

--pete


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread John Armstrong
I always have to do a 'Refresh' when changing the HTML. Its quite painful..

I tend to author the bulk of my html in an external editor that is
more suitable to the purpose and fast ( the eclipse validators are
painfully slow, particularly in Javascript intensive pages). Then I
tweak it in Eclipse and hit F5. A Lot.

John-

On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 5:03 PM, pete swulius pswul...@gmail.com wrote:
 It appears that using external html editors causes sync issues.  Apparently
 eclipse doesn't monitor changes to the file system, except to warn you that
 it's out of sync.  I would love the know the truth of it as I could very
 well be missing something obvious.  In fact, I would bet that I am,
 considering that eclispe is so cool.

 I am currently using the Amateras plugin:
 http://amateras.sourceforge.jp/cgi-bin/fswiki_en/wiki.cgi?page=EclipseHTMLEditor.
  I have no problems with it, but I use it only for the syntax coloring
 and
 the occasional content assist.

 --pete


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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread Eduardo Nunes
it's very strange, because if I hit ctrl+shift+f in some html code
with WTP, the source code will be completely unwell formatted. I will
try amateras plugin, thank you

On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 9:15 PM, John Armstrong siber...@siberian.org wrote:
 I always have to do a 'Refresh' when changing the HTML. Its quite painful..

 I tend to author the bulk of my html in an external editor that is
 more suitable to the purpose and fast ( the eclipse validators are
 painfully slow, particularly in Javascript intensive pages). Then I
 tweak it in Eclipse and hit F5. A Lot.

 John-

 On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 5:03 PM, pete swulius pswul...@gmail.com wrote:
 It appears that using external html editors causes sync issues.  Apparently
 eclipse doesn't monitor changes to the file system, except to warn you that
 it's out of sync.  I would love the know the truth of it as I could very
 well be missing something obvious.  In fact, I would bet that I am,
 considering that eclispe is so cool.

 I am currently using the Amateras plugin:
 http://amateras.sourceforge.jp/cgi-bin/fswiki_en/wiki.cgi?page=EclipseHTMLEditor.
  I have no problems with it, but I use it only for the syntax coloring
 and
 the occasional content assist.

 --pete


 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org





-- 
Eduardo S. Nunes
http://e-nunes.com.br

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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-18 Thread pete swulius
While we are on the topic, does anyone know if there's a super-secret
version of wicket-bench that plays well with the Eclipse 3.3 debugger?  If
not, how much effort would it take to get it up to date?  I would be glad to
contribute.

Or, alternatively, is there another option out there for minimizing the
hunt-n-clickathon?

--pete


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-01 Thread Linda van der Pal
Sonar is a tool that measures code quality, based on a lot of other 
tools like PMD, CheckStyle, Cobertura, and others. I've just started 
using it and it's very good.


You should be able to get Effective Java at all the better bookstores 
and otherwise online at places like Amazon.com.


Regards,
Linda

Carlo Camerino wrote:

What does sonar do?
Where can I get effective java?

That's one of our problems actually.
When we go on site in clients we have a hard time going to our centralized
tools.
I have been looking for an offline bugzilla or trac of some sort.
Similar to offline gmail.
I'm looking to also setup a distributed maven repository.

Per our experience, all our tools become useless when there is no internet
connection available, and sadly, most of our clients don't provide on.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2009 at 7:02 AM, Martijn Dashorst 
martijn.dasho...@gmail.com wrote:

  

Our current stack:
 - maven
 - Java 6
 - hibernate
 - spring
 - Wicket
 - svn
 - hudson
 - artifactory (though we might switch to another one)
[ - sonar (icing on the cake) ]

Wendy Smoak taught me an valuable lesson: use a company repository
manager for maven, and a local one on your machine. This way you can
run maven offline as well (after downloading the internet first).

Martijn

On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 5:13 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com
wrote:


My boss has asked me to manage development for a Java project. I'm going
  

to


be working with two other programmers and one designer.

This is the first time that our organization has tried to formally
coordinate several programmers on a project together, and it is also the
first Java project we've done here (I'm the only programmer with
  

extensive


Java experience). I chose to use Wicket for this project because it
  

seemed


to be the most intuitive framework, and because I hope it will make it
  

easy


for the designer and programmers to work together without stepping on
  

each


others toes.

At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and Ant
  

for


deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking at
  

other


tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the
  

programmers'


work?

My goal is to find a few tools that
- work well with Wicket
- make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
- manage project dependencies
- are easy to set up
- are easy to use
- are free

I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!

  


--
Become a Wicket expert, learn from the best: http://wicketinaction.com
Apache Wicket 1.3.5 is released
Get it now: http://www.apache.org/dyn/closer.cgi/wicket/1.3.

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No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com 
Version: 8.5.287 / Virus Database: 270.12.11/2089 - Release Date: 04/30/09 17:53:00


  



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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-01 Thread Matt Welch

Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):

IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
Source Control - SVN
Build - Maven
Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually purchased and
used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same company as
JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects; not
bad, but not fantastic either)
Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it than
nothing at all, but could be better)


Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial tools
like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for defect
management. 

My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.

-Matt


-- 
View this message in context: 
http://www.nabble.com/Tools-for-Managing-a-Wicket-Project-tp23299396p23334970.html
Sent from the Wicket - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-01 Thread Carlo Camerino
ya first time i actualy looked at sonar.i guess it's different from sonarj.
I thought they were the same thing.
I see this in the spring website.

Will take a look at it..
Seems like a tool which will be useful for us.

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 3:28 PM, Linda van der Pal 
lvd...@heritageagenturen.nl wrote:

 Sonar is a tool that measures code quality, based on a lot of other tools
 like PMD, CheckStyle, Cobertura, and others. I've just started using it and
 it's very good.

 You should be able to get Effective Java at all the better bookstores and
 otherwise online at places like Amazon.com.

 Regards,
 Linda

 Carlo Camerino wrote:

 What does sonar do?
 Where can I get effective java?

 That's one of our problems actually.
 When we go on site in clients we have a hard time going to our centralized
 tools.
 I have been looking for an offline bugzilla or trac of some sort.
 Similar to offline gmail.
 I'm looking to also setup a distributed maven repository.

 Per our experience, all our tools become useless when there is no internet
 connection available, and sadly, most of our clients don't provide on.

 On Thu, Apr 30, 2009 at 7:02 AM, Martijn Dashorst 
 martijn.dasho...@gmail.com wrote:



 Our current stack:
  - maven
  - Java 6
  - hibernate
  - spring
  - Wicket
  - svn
  - hudson
  - artifactory (though we might switch to another one)
 [ - sonar (icing on the cake) ]

 Wendy Smoak taught me an valuable lesson: use a company repository
 manager for maven, and a local one on your machine. This way you can
 run maven offline as well (after downloading the internet first).

 Martijn

 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 5:13 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com
 wrote:


 My boss has asked me to manage development for a Java project. I'm going


 to


 be working with two other programmers and one designer.

 This is the first time that our organization has tried to formally
 coordinate several programmers on a project together, and it is also the
 first Java project we've done here (I'm the only programmer with


 extensive


 Java experience). I chose to use Wicket for this project because it


 seemed


 to be the most intuitive framework, and because I hope it will make it


 easy


 for the designer and programmers to work together without stepping on


 each


 others toes.

 At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and Ant


 for


 deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking at


 other


 tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the


 programmers'


 work?

 My goal is to find a few tools that
 - work well with Wicket
 - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
 - manage project dependencies
 - are easy to set up
 - are easy to use
 - are free

 I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!




 --
 Become a Wicket expert, learn from the best: http://wicketinaction.com
 Apache Wicket 1.3.5 is released
 Get it now: http://www.apache.org/dyn/closer.cgi/wicket/1.3.

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org





  


 No virus found in this incoming message.
 Checked by AVG - www.avg.com Version: 8.5.287 / Virus Database:
 270.12.11/2089 - Release Date: 04/30/09 17:53:00





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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-05-01 Thread Carlo Camerino
we used to be bugzilla, mediawiki, continuum statck.we moved to Trac. It was
simply amazing with all those plugins.

Code Review WIth Trac Is Good.
Review Board is also good software but it doesn't suit our programming
needs.

On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 11:38 PM, Matt Welch matt...@welchkin.net wrote:


 Tools that our team is using (after some trial and error):

 IDE - Eclipse/IDEA
 Source Control - SVN
 Build - Maven
 Local Network Maven Repo - Nexus (after a year trying different ones)
 Build Server  - TeamCity, which absolutely rocks (We actually purchased and
 used Bamboo for 9 months. I can't believe it comes from the same company as
 JIRA. Bamboo was terrible.)
 Story Mgmt/Defects - Rally (hosted commercial app for agile projects; not
 bad, but not fantastic either)
 Code Review - Code Collaborator (again not bad and I'd rather have it than
 nothing at all, but could be better)


 Our QA team has used various testing tools from expensive commercial tools
 like Mercury (now HP) Quality Center to Selenium. They use Rally for defect
 management.

 My highest recommendations are for TeamCity, Nexus, and SVN.

 -Matt


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 View this message in context:
 http://www.nabble.com/Tools-for-Managing-a-Wicket-Project-tp23299396p23334970.html
 Sent from the Wicket - User mailing list archive at Nabble.com.



Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-30 Thread Geeta Madhavi
Hi...

U can use Maven,Eclipse latest version for development..Server as Tomcat or
any other you wish..but use Maven instead of ant. And for reference you can
check the Wicket in Action book



On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:43 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com wrote:

 My boss has asked me to manage development for a Java project. I'm going to
 be working with two other programmers and one designer.

 This is the first time that our organization has tried to formally
 coordinate several programmers on a project together, and it is also the
 first Java project we've done here (I'm the only programmer with extensive
 Java experience). I chose to use Wicket for this project because it seemed
 to be the most intuitive framework, and because I hope it will make it easy
 for the designer and programmers to work together without stepping on each
 others toes.

 At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and Ant for
 deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking at other
 tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the
 programmers'
 work?

 My goal is to find a few tools that
 - work well with Wicket
 - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
 - manage project dependencies
 - are easy to set up
 - are easy to use
 - are free

 I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!




-- 
Regards.
Geeta Madhavi. K


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-30 Thread Per Lundholm
No tools require an internet connection all the time. The repositories
Nexus, Archiva etc are local to your site. They only download from the
internet when you ask for something the first time.

That is one reason for having a local repository manager. Then you
have your personal repository as always with Maven.

If you are offline, but have a class library on some media, e.g. a USB
stick, you can deploy that to your local repository.

Hope this helps.

/Per

On Thu, Apr 30, 2009 at 12:47 PM, Geeta Madhavi madhavi.ge...@gmail.com wrote:
 Hi...

 U can use Maven,Eclipse latest version for development..Server as Tomcat or
 any other you wish..but use Maven instead of ant. And for reference you can
 check the Wicket in Action book



 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:43 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com wrote:

 My boss has asked me to manage development for a Java project. I'm going to
 be working with two other programmers and one designer.

 This is the first time that our organization has tried to formally
 coordinate several programmers on a project together, and it is also the
 first Java project we've done here (I'm the only programmer with extensive
 Java experience). I chose to use Wicket for this project because it seemed
 to be the most intuitive framework, and because I hope it will make it easy
 for the designer and programmers to work together without stepping on each
 others toes.

 At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and Ant for
 deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking at other
 tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the
 programmers'
 work?

 My goal is to find a few tools that
 - work well with Wicket
 - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
 - manage project dependencies
 - are easy to set up
 - are easy to use
 - are free

 I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!




 --
 Regards.
 Geeta Madhavi. K




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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-30 Thread Curtis Cooley
Dane Laverty wrote:
 My boss has asked me to manage development for a Java project. I'm going to
 be working with two other programmers and one designer.

 This is the first time that our organization has tried to formally
 coordinate several programmers on a project together, and it is also the
 first Java project we've done here (I'm the only programmer with extensive
 Java experience). I chose to use Wicket for this project because it seemed
 to be the most intuitive framework, and because I hope it will make it easy
 for the designer and programmers to work together without stepping on each
 others toes.

 At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and Ant for
 deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking at other
 tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the programmers'
 work?

 My goal is to find a few tools that
 - work well with Wicket
 - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
 - manage project dependencies
 - are easy to set up
 - are easy to use
 - are free

 I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!

   
Go to http://www.pragprog.com/titles/prj/ship-it and at least buy the
eBook. It's $20 and will save you at least 10 times that in headaches.



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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-30 Thread Andrew Lombardi

Martijn,

a local version of artifactory?  doesn't that get ... large?

or are you just talking about ~/.m2/repository?

On Apr 29, 2009, at 4:02 PM, Martijn Dashorst wrote:


Our current stack:
- maven
- Java 6
- hibernate
- spring
- Wicket
- svn
- hudson
- artifactory (though we might switch to another one)
[ - sonar (icing on the cake) ]

Wendy Smoak taught me an valuable lesson: use a company repository
manager for maven, and a local one on your machine. This way you can
run maven offline as well (after downloading the internet first).

Martijn

On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 5:13 PM, Dane Laverty  
danelave...@gmail.com wrote:
My boss has asked me to manage development for a Java project. I'm  
going to

be working with two other programmers and one designer.

This is the first time that our organization has tried to formally
coordinate several programmers on a project together, and it is  
also the
first Java project we've done here (I'm the only programmer with  
extensive
Java experience). I chose to use Wicket for this project because it  
seemed
to be the most intuitive framework, and because I hope it will make  
it easy
for the designer and programmers to work together without stepping  
on each

others toes.

At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and  
Ant for
deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking  
at other
tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the  
programmers'

work?

My goal is to find a few tools that
- work well with Wicket
- make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
- manage project dependencies
- are easy to set up
- are easy to use
- are free

I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!





--
Become a Wicket expert, learn from the best: http://wicketinaction.com
Apache Wicket 1.3.5 is released
Get it now: http://www.apache.org/dyn/closer.cgi/wicket/1.3.

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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-30 Thread Nick Heudecker
As long as you clear out things like nightlies and snapshots it's not too
bad.  Otherwise, things can get massive.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2009 at 11:47 AM, Andrew Lombardi
and...@mysticcoders.comwrote:

 Martijn,

 a local version of artifactory?  doesn't that get ... large?

 or are you just talking about ~/.m2/repository?


-- 
Nick Heudecker
Professional Wicket Training  Consulting
http://www.systemmobile.com


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Florian Sperber

Hi Dane,

Dane Laverty schrieb:

My goal is to find a few tools that
- work well with Wicket
- make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
- manage project dependencies
- are easy to set up
- are easy to use
- are free

I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!



what about:

- svn (instead of cvs)
- maven (check the quickstart project on the wicket page)
- archiva (your own maven repository)
- hudson (continous integration build system)


Kind regards
Florian Sperber

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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Jeremy Thomerson
I'd definitely suggest SVN over CVS and Maven over Ant.  Maven truly
manages dependencies.  Ant does not.

I'd suggest Continuum rather than Hudson simply because it is quick
and easy to set up and it is built to build Maven projects - so it
will be easier for your inexperienced team to do so.

And of course, a team training course is never a bad idea :)

--
Jeremy Thomerson
http://www.wickettraining.com




On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:19 AM, Florian Sperber f...@sperber.info wrote:
 Hi Dane,

 Dane Laverty schrieb:

 My goal is to find a few tools that
 - work well with Wicket
 - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
 - manage project dependencies
 - are easy to set up
 - are easy to use
 - are free

 I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!


 what about:

 - svn (instead of cvs)
 - maven (check the quickstart project on the wicket page)
 - archiva (your own maven repository)
 - hudson (continous integration build system)


 Kind regards
 Florian Sperber

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org



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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Dane Laverty
Thanks for the suggestions of Continuum, Hudson, and Archiva. I'm not
familiar with any of them, so that at least gives me some direction. Also,
is there a book or website you would recommend that explains some best
practices for Java project management?

I would love to get a team training course in here. That's what we really
need, but recent budget cuts have forced the college to cut way back on its
training budget. As soon as the funding is back, I'm planning to give you
guys a call :)

On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:39 AM, Jeremy Thomerson jer...@wickettraining.com
 wrote:

 I'd definitely suggest SVN over CVS and Maven over Ant.  Maven truly
 manages dependencies.  Ant does not.

 I'd suggest Continuum rather than Hudson simply because it is quick
 and easy to set up and it is built to build Maven projects - so it
 will be easier for your inexperienced team to do so.

 And of course, a team training course is never a bad idea :)

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com




 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:19 AM, Florian Sperber f...@sperber.info
 wrote:
  Hi Dane,
 
  Dane Laverty schrieb:
 
  My goal is to find a few tools that
  - work well with Wicket
  - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
  - manage project dependencies
  - are easy to set up
  - are easy to use
  - are free
 
  I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!
 
 
  what about:
 
  - svn (instead of cvs)
  - maven (check the quickstart project on the wicket page)
  - archiva (your own maven repository)
  - hudson (continous integration build system)
 
 
  Kind regards
  Florian Sperber
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 

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 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Per Lundholm
Hi

Have you seen the Maven guide?
http://www.sonatype.com/books/maven-book/reference/

It presents Nexus instead of Archiva which we use at my current contract.

We also use Hudson and it was really easy to setup. You can try it
with a simple click on the webstart button here:
http://wiki.hudson-ci.org/display/HUDSON/Meet+Hudson

Good Luck!

mvh
  Per


On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 6:43 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com wrote:
 Thanks for the suggestions of Continuum, Hudson, and Archiva. I'm not
 familiar with any of them, so that at least gives me some direction. Also,
 is there a book or website you would recommend that explains some best
 practices for Java project management?

 I would love to get a team training course in here. That's what we really
 need, but recent budget cuts have forced the college to cut way back on its
 training budget. As soon as the funding is back, I'm planning to give you
 guys a call :)

 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:39 AM, Jeremy Thomerson jer...@wickettraining.com
 wrote:

 I'd definitely suggest SVN over CVS and Maven over Ant.  Maven truly
 manages dependencies.  Ant does not.

 I'd suggest Continuum rather than Hudson simply because it is quick
 and easy to set up and it is built to build Maven projects - so it
 will be easier for your inexperienced team to do so.

 And of course, a team training course is never a bad idea :)

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com




 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:19 AM, Florian Sperber f...@sperber.info
 wrote:
  Hi Dane,
 
  Dane Laverty schrieb:
 
  My goal is to find a few tools that
  - work well with Wicket
  - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
  - manage project dependencies
  - are easy to set up
  - are easy to use
  - are free
 
  I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!
 
 
  what about:
 
  - svn (instead of cvs)
  - maven (check the quickstart project on the wicket page)
  - archiva (your own maven repository)
  - hudson (continous integration build system)
 
 
  Kind regards
  Florian Sperber
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Carlo Camerino
try mercurial instead of subversion. (we're starting migration to mercurial)
We are on our way to migrate there.
Hudson is very easy to configure.
Try eclipse and maven 2 also.

one thing that i'd like to have though is a way to track common custom
components.
We have developed a lot of common components but once the project begins to
become larger, it's hard to keep track of them.

On Thu, Apr 30, 2009 at 1:06 AM, Per Lundholm per.lundh...@gmail.comwrote:

 Hi

 Have you seen the Maven guide?
 http://www.sonatype.com/books/maven-book/reference/

 It presents Nexus instead of Archiva which we use at my current contract.

 We also use Hudson and it was really easy to setup. You can try it
 with a simple click on the webstart button here:
 http://wiki.hudson-ci.org/display/HUDSON/Meet+Hudson

 Good Luck!

 mvh
  Per


 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 6:43 PM, Dane Laverty danelave...@gmail.com
 wrote:
  Thanks for the suggestions of Continuum, Hudson, and Archiva. I'm not
  familiar with any of them, so that at least gives me some direction.
 Also,
  is there a book or website you would recommend that explains some best
  practices for Java project management?
 
  I would love to get a team training course in here. That's what we really
  need, but recent budget cuts have forced the college to cut way back on
 its
  training budget. As soon as the funding is back, I'm planning to give you
  guys a call :)
 
  On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:39 AM, Jeremy Thomerson 
 jer...@wickettraining.com
  wrote:
 
  I'd definitely suggest SVN over CVS and Maven over Ant.  Maven truly
  manages dependencies.  Ant does not.
 
  I'd suggest Continuum rather than Hudson simply because it is quick
  and easy to set up and it is built to build Maven projects - so it
  will be easier for your inexperienced team to do so.
 
  And of course, a team training course is never a bad idea :)
 
  --
  Jeremy Thomerson
  http://www.wickettraining.com
 
 
 
 
  On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:19 AM, Florian Sperber f...@sperber.info
  wrote:
   Hi Dane,
  
   Dane Laverty schrieb:
  
   My goal is to find a few tools that
   - work well with Wicket
   - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
   - manage project dependencies
   - are easy to set up
   - are easy to use
   - are free
  
   I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!
  
  
   what about:
  
   - svn (instead of cvs)
   - maven (check the quickstart project on the wicket page)
   - archiva (your own maven repository)
   - hudson (continous integration build system)
  
  
   Kind regards
   Florian Sperber
  
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   To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
   For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
  
  
 
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RE: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Stefan Droog
I can also recommend O'Reilly Java Power Tools book:

See http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596527938/

Regards,
Stefan


Van: Dane Laverty [danelave...@gmail.com]
Verzonden: woensdag 29 april 2009 18:43
Aan: users@wicket.apache.org
Onderwerp: Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

Thanks for the suggestions of Continuum, Hudson, and Archiva. I'm not
familiar with any of them, so that at least gives me some direction. Also,
is there a book or website you would recommend that explains some best
practices for Java project management?

I would love to get a team training course in here. That's what we really
need, but recent budget cuts have forced the college to cut way back on its
training budget. As soon as the funding is back, I'm planning to give you
guys a call :)

On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:39 AM, Jeremy Thomerson jer...@wickettraining.com
 wrote:

 I'd definitely suggest SVN over CVS and Maven over Ant.  Maven truly
 manages dependencies.  Ant does not.

 I'd suggest Continuum rather than Hudson simply because it is quick
 and easy to set up and it is built to build Maven projects - so it
 will be easier for your inexperienced team to do so.

 And of course, a team training course is never a bad idea :)

 --
 Jeremy Thomerson
 http://www.wickettraining.com




 On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:19 AM, Florian Sperber f...@sperber.info
 wrote:
  Hi Dane,
 
  Dane Laverty schrieb:
 
  My goal is to find a few tools that
  - work well with Wicket
  - make it easy for programmers to check code in and out
  - manage project dependencies
  - are easy to set up
  - are easy to use
  - are free
 
  I appreciate any and all suggestions. Thanks for your help!
 
 
  what about:
 
  - svn (instead of cvs)
  - maven (check the quickstart project on the wicket page)
  - archiva (your own maven repository)
  - hudson (continous integration build system)
 
 
  Kind regards
  Florian Sperber
 
  -
  To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
  For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org
 
 

 -
 To unsubscribe, e-mail: users-unsubscr...@wicket.apache.org
 For additional commands, e-mail: users-h...@wicket.apache.org



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Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Conrad Hesse
Hi Dane,


 At my previous job, we used CVS for managing code contribution and Ant for
 deployment. Is that still a good solution, or should I be looking at other
 tools? Also, how do you coordinate the designer's work with the
 programmers'
 work?


Although I would choose SVN you probably won't notice much of a difference
to CVS. Many of it's advantages (like keeping logs of renamed files, fast
compare to base revision, ...) are neglectable when using it in combination
e.g. eclipse.

I would stick to Ant. I don't like Mavens configurative approach. Also, I
find it harder to get decent documentation/help on the web. If Ant works for
you there is no need to switch. If you want dependency management look at
Ivy for ant.

We currently use Hudson for continuous integration. I love it. It it easy to
set up and configure. Nice interface. Just works.

About the coordination with designers: From my experience it works easy if
the designer has some basic knowledge about how wicket works. In my current
project the design was done pretty late (imo too late) and the first html
pages were coded by the developers. Later the designers kicked in and worked
on their own branch while developers continued on the main trunk. I would
try to avoid scenario.


Re: Tools for Managing a Wicket Project

2009-04-29 Thread Jeremy Thomerson
I would HIGHLY recommend that each of you get a copy of Joshua Bloch's
Effective Java, now in it's second edition.  It's not really project
management, but since your team as a whole is not mature with Java, it
will offer some good advice.  Of course, make sure everyone is
familiar with Wicket in Action and has gone through the exercises -
that will give them a good foundation.

As far as books on Java project management, I don't have any
recommendations.  I've perused some but never been fascinated.  Maybe
someone else will have a good recommenda