Re: [Vo]:Strange new world

2021-09-24 Thread Jones Beene
 
Terry Blanton wrote:  
 
 > JP-7 isn't so secret any more.
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JP-7


Terry,
One detail from another site is that the thermal output of this fuel mix is 
about 50% more, per KG, than kerosene.
Curiously, many claims of thermal gains reported in LENR experimenters are in 
the range of 50% net gain in output over input. 

The other curious detail is that Shell Petroleum concocted the mix. However 
nowhere is a connection mentioned to Shell's polystyrene catalyst used by 
Holmlid. I wonder if Holmlid has ever consulted for SAAB ?

Probably not and both details are most likely coincidental...




  

Re: [Vo]:Strange new world

2021-09-24 Thread Jones Beene
 Don  wrote:
> Tell me more about off-loading unspent SR-71 fuel.

Ha - a gigantic flash from the past. At least a dozen years ago.

I have this vague recollection of Richard M (RIP), the Dime Box saloon, zip 
fuel, and the inadvertant Mills' hydrino
shaken not stirred - so to speak
One new item -- not considered back then but intriguing - is the role of Shell 
catalyst, dense H and Holmlid.
Query - was nano-boron the whole truth, just a red herring or could it have 
been actually activated by the infamous styrene catalyst?
Maybe the answer is to be found at the Dime Box, who knows?
Jones




Re: [Vo]:What is meant by vortex here?

2021-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
 Frank
Are you saying that Steorn was not a scam ?


Frank Grimer wrote:  
 
 By removing the oscillation he removed the very thing that was causing the 
Steorn effect I seem to remember.
Terry Blanton wrote:

We called it the "Little Effect".  Devices never worked around Scott Little (or 
his daughter?)
Kinda the opposite of the "Hutchison Effect".  :)
  

Re: [Vo]:What is meant by vortex here?

2021-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
Bob Higgins wrote: 
[snip] The trick is finding the (plus) in Storms' Ni(plus) material.  Anything 
I find that is interesting will also be tested in MOAC.
I will ask Brian Ahern if he has available any left-over nano-nickel (plus Pd) 
to donate to the cause. 

This is the same spin-cast  material that showed good gain in tests done for 
EPRI many years ago. I think the alloy with 5% Pd performed better than higher 
levels, which was an important finding on its own...
Jones












5

Jones



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Re: [Vo]:What is meant by vortex here?

2021-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
 Hi Bob
This is great news. Did you by any chance also get hold of the reactor 
apparatus that they built to replicate the Randell Mills gas phase experiment? 
That was a long time ago and it may have disappeared.

As I recall this kind of experiment could have changed the entire landscape of 
LENR had they done it correctly. However, I have forgotten most of the details 
of how they blew it. They did see a few glimpses of gain but failed to pursue 
obvious ways to improve the results - that much was clear. And now with the 
added input of Holmlid, it could be possible to see proven gain from the simple 
gas phase plus catalyst setup.

It is/was a very simple experimental design but the 'devil is in the details' 
as they say.


  Bob Higgins wrote: 
 Hi Jones,
I now have Earthtech's MOAC (calorimeter) in my lab and I am refurbishing and 
re-commissioning it.  Earthtech is now closed and they are emptying their 
building.

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Re: [Vo]:What is meant by vortex here?

2021-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
 Bob Higgins wrote:  
 BTW, I was told that Earthtech testing of the Griggs device did NOT show 
excess heat.  The testing process was described to me.

Hey Bob - that null result does not surprise me but is it really meaningful?

Earthtech has a precision calorimeter which can accommodate small cavitation 
devices but as Rothwell has stated in the past, the Griggs machine is about 
1000 times too large to be tested by them. He says that Ga Tech did test the 
device and found net thermal gain but, sadly, those results are not to be found 
on the WWW for unknown reasons ... so... it looks like an open issue. 

I wish someone would do the definitive testing of the large machine and have 
the courage to defend positive results if found.


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Re: [Vo]:What is meant by vortex here?

2021-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
 Hi Frank,
I had not seen your Russian reference about the Potapov device. (which needs a 
bit of editing, probably due to poor translation)
This brings ti mind one curious detail in the Griggs/Potapov results - as well 
as some Casimir force, magnetic motor, Maxwell's demon, and even a few LENR 
experiments - is that the upper range of thermal gain (output over input) seems 
to be limited to something like 1.25 or so. 

Which is to say that there is some real gain (overunity) - but not much.
Does you beta atmosphere theory address this point?
Jones


Frank Grimer wrote:  
 
https://remontideas.ru/en/warm-floor/vechnyi-dvigatel-potapova-generator-svobodnoi-energii-s-samozapitkoi.html

A bit of history.  

Re: [Vo]:What is meant by vortex here?

2021-08-05 Thread Jones Beene
 David Jonsson wrote: 
 
 Hi
The concept vortex seems to be used in different ways.
How is it used on this list?

> As Bill B sez: Vortex-L was created for discussions of research into vortex 
> or cavitation devices like that of Griggs which exhibit apparent 
> anomalousenergy it evolved into a discussion into all kinds of"taboo" 
> physics like cold fusion.

For instance, I joined out of interest in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube which 
still may harbor a few mysteries despite not being efficient as a cooling 
device ... 

  

[Vo]:Thermacore and the missing link to the Kervran effect

2021-07-13 Thread Jones Beene
A neglected paper and fringe theory, which may stand up to closer scrutiny, 
appeared last year from Romania. It addresses the Kervran effect and the Mills 
hydrino with a vortex model somewhat reminiscent of the recent "Berry" 
superconductor theory.

https://medcraveonline.com/PAIJ/PAIJ-04-00204.pdf
The Kervran effect has an overlooked connection to one of the most convincing 
experiments ever in LENR, involving the company Thermacore, Inc ... and their 
work with Randell Mills plus the eventual patent nearly 30 years ago. The 
important paper from that era has been removed from the BLP site: Thermacore, 
Inc. "Final Report, SBIR Phase I, Nascent Hydrogen: An Energy Source." 

The Thermacore Patent, now expired, is 5,273,635 from 1993 Inventors: Gernert, 
Shaubach, and Ernst Note: Randell Mills is NOT listed as co-inventor. Nor did 
they mention the Kervran effect, but the did document a characteristic emission 
line at 54.4 eV which Mills predicted. There was no radioactivity. One wonders 
in hindsight if they would have found calcium after the year long run, should 
they have looked. 

Another missed opportunity?Consider this quote from Thermacore: "Light water 
electrolytic experiments at Thermacore show positive results. The most 
outstanding example is a cell producing 41 watts of heat with only 5 watts of 
electrical input. The cell has operated continuously for over one year..." That 
is a COP of 8, claimed by experts.

It bears repeating: THE CELL OPERATED CONTINUOUSLY FOR OVER ONE YEAR, and 
remember, this statement is not coming from some fly-by-night self-promoting 
entrepreneur, nor even university professors who are ignorant of manufacturing 
realities - but instead it comes from one of the most well-respected of 
high-tech firms in the World, in thermal engineering. This is the firm which 
invented the heat-pipe and other related devices.

Yet it all came to naught. Go figure.



Re: [Vo]:A Super New Theory to Explain Superconductivity

2021-07-12 Thread Jones Beene
 Yes, extrapolation is the fun part, even if premature.
One possibility which is intriguing to anyone who experiments with ultra strong 
NIB magnets- 
... imagine a small switchable magnet with a surface field of 10 T instead of 
.5 T. 


Bob Higgins wrote:  
 You are right, of course, Jones.  The point is that application of RTSCs will 
likely not be something that is a direct extrapolation of how today's 
superconductors are used.  The "killer app" for RTSCs will be something only 
found when RTSCs materialize, taking advantage of the yet-to-be discovered RTSC 
unique properties. Part of the problem in finding RTSCs is that they may poorly 
resemble what are regarded as superconductors today.
On Mon, Jul 12, 2021 at 7:31 AM Jones Beene wrote:

 Hey Bob,
Yes, the "killer app" for RTSC, if there is one, is not apparent... 

... however, it is probably not wise to belittle an emerging technology which 
is so fundamentally advanced that the best applications are not even evident to 
the proponents... or ... to quote a leading expert on the emergence of a prior 
breakthrough tech of some years ago...

 "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." 

 Thomas Watson, president of IBM, 1943 

Bob Higgins wrote:  
 When I worked in research for a large company, the discovery of the first 
HTSCs stimulated research into the RF properties of superconductors - type I 
and type II.  Since there was a huge jump in Tc, we considered that room 
temperature superconductors were just around the corner.  What we discovered 
was that the higher the Tc, the worse the usable qualities of the 
superconductor.  Our estimate was that a RTSC would actually be no better than 
copper.  Superconductors are only zero resistance at DC.  There is a finite 
penetration of current in all superconductors for AC and RF.   The closer you 
are to the Tc and the higher the Tc is, the more AC/RF resistance you have and 
the lower the critical magnetic field.  Our conclusion was that the only 
superconductors that were useful over Cu for RF applications were deeply cooled 
Type I.  I think that RTSCs will only have niche applications.  But ... I would 
love to be surprised.

 Well as this paper implies, the field of superconductivity is "heating up" 
these days ..literally
The prior story which may be very important on this point - and in the 
relentless progress towards usable RTSC - room temperature superconductivity - 
itself came out just a few weeks back

https://phys.org/news/2021-07-ternary-hydrides-lanthanum-yttrium-high-temperature.html'
...  which is a high pressure but ambient temp (non cryogenic) phenomenon... 
involving superhydrides ... which curiously could be related to LENR and the 
Mills/Holmlid effect, if as I suspect the superhydrides are found to be in 
highly redundant ground states (as an alternative to pressurization)

The holy grail of course would be a metal superhydride going into RTSC phase at 
ambient pressure. 

This advance would revolutionized the economy in so may ways - it would be the 
"next big thing" as they say. 

Does the "Berry phase" of this new theory help us to understand superhydride 
RTSC ? 

It doesn't look that way so far. The whole thing could be little more than hype 
if it does not illuminate RTSC.
You have to worry when a PR firm releases a technical paper.


    Kevin O'Malley wrote:  
 
 A Super New Theory to Explain Superconductivity
Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism ^ | 5 July 2021 | Hiroyasu 
Koizumi

  
  
  

Re: [Vo]:A Super New Theory to Explain Superconductivity

2021-07-12 Thread Jones Beene
 Hey Bob,
Yes, the "killer app" for RTSC, if there is one, is not apparent... 

... however, it is probably not wise to belittle an emerging technology which 
is so fundamentally advanced that the best applications are not even evident to 
the proponents... or ... to quote a leading expert on the emergence of a prior 
breakthrough tech of some years ago...

 "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." 

 Thomas Watson, president of IBM, 1943 

Bob Higgins wrote:  
 When I worked in research for a large company, the discovery of the first 
HTSCs stimulated research into the RF properties of superconductors - type I 
and type II.  Since there was a huge jump in Tc, we considered that room 
temperature superconductors were just around the corner.  What we discovered 
was that the higher the Tc, the worse the usable qualities of the 
superconductor.  Our estimate was that a RTSC would actually be no better than 
copper.  Superconductors are only zero resistance at DC.  There is a finite 
penetration of current in all superconductors for AC and RF.   The closer you 
are to the Tc and the higher the Tc is, the more AC/RF resistance you have and 
the lower the critical magnetic field.  Our conclusion was that the only 
superconductors that were useful over Cu for RF applications were deeply cooled 
Type I.  I think that RTSCs will only have niche applications.  But ... I would 
love to be surprised.
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 3:02 PM Jones Beene  wrote:

 Well as this paper implies, the field of superconductivity is "heating up" 
these days ..literally
The prior story which may be very important on this point - and in the 
relentless progress towards usable RTSC - room temperature superconductivity - 
itself came out just a few weeks back

https://phys.org/news/2021-07-ternary-hydrides-lanthanum-yttrium-high-temperature.html'
...  which is a high pressure but ambient temp (non cryogenic) phenomenon... 
involving superhydrides ... which curiously could be related to LENR and the 
Mills/Holmlid effect, if as I suspect the superhydrides are found to be in 
highly redundant ground states (as an alternative to pressurization)

The holy grail of course would be a metal superhydride going into RTSC phase at 
ambient pressure. 

This advance would revolutionized the economy in so may ways - it would be the 
"next big thing" as they say. 

Does the "Berry phase" of this new theory help us to understand superhydride 
RTSC ? 

It doesn't look that way so far. The whole thing could be little more than hype 
if it does not illuminate RTSC.
You have to worry when a PR firm releases a technical paper.


    Kevin O'Malley wrote:  
 
 A Super New Theory to Explain Superconductivity
Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism ^ | 5 July 2021 | Hiroyasu 
Koizumi

  
  

Re: [Vo]:A Super New Theory to Explain Superconductivity

2021-07-11 Thread Jones Beene
 Well as this paper implies, the field of superconductivity is "heating up" 
these days ..literally
The prior story which may be very important on this point - and in the 
relentless progress towards usable RTSC - room temperature superconductivity - 
itself came out just a few weeks back

https://phys.org/news/2021-07-ternary-hydrides-lanthanum-yttrium-high-temperature.html'
...  which is a high pressure but ambient temp (non cryogenic) phenomenon... 
involving superhydrides ... which curiously could be related to LENR and the 
Mills/Holmlid effect, if as I suspect the superhydrides are found to be in 
highly redundant ground states (as an alternative to pressurization)

The holy grail of course would be a metal superhydride going into RTSC phase at 
ambient pressure. 

This advance would revolutionized the economy in so may ways - it would be the 
"next big thing" as they say. 

Does the "Berry phase" of this new theory help us to understand superhydride 
RTSC ? 

It doesn't look that way so far. The whole thing could be little more than hype 
if it does not illuminate RTSC.
You have to worry when a PR firm releases a technical paper.


    Kevin O'Malley wrote:  
 
 A Super New Theory to Explain Superconductivity
Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism ^ | 5 July 2021 | Hiroyasu 
Koizumi

  

Re: [Vo]:wind powered vehicles

2021-06-30 Thread Jones Beene
 Harry,
The "bet" video that you found is priceless. Thanks. Once again the rep of UCLA 
takes a hit :-)
Note also that there are actually 3 different effective (x,y, and z) axes of 
rotation in the geared mechanism of the vehicle drivetrain - although 
admittedly it is a stretch to say that they contribute at all to the surprising 
outcome via the Dzhanibekov effect.

-- but neither is this ruled out by the favored explanation !


H LV wrote:  
 
 Regarding the Dzhanibekov Effect, this video from standupmaths (Matt Parker) 
shows why it happens through the use of graphical representations of the 
relevant equations. 
https://youtu.be/l51LcwHOW7s

There is also a follow up to the veritasium video on the wind powered vehicle 
involving a $10,000 bet.
https://youtu.be/yCsgoLc_fzI
Harry
Jones Beene wrote:

 FWIW - The same poster has put up a video or two concerning the Dzhanibekov 
Effect - which is fascinating in its own right - not well known, and possibly 
not fully characterized since it seems to demand more than one (and preferably 
three) interacting axes of rotation. 

Veritas  neglects to mention this oddball effect in the wind power situation, 
for the obvious reason that there is apparently only one axis of rotation which 
is the fan blades. 

... but ... 

what if the a similar effect (to Dzhanibekov ) relates to having one major axis 
of rotation plus one or more truncated axes, which maybe manifest as vibration 
?  This relates to the spinning satellite with the whip antennae which will 
flip-flop... (to the embarrassment of NASA)

   H LV wrote:   Is it possible for a wind powered vehicle to move faster than 
the wind while it is moving in the same direction as the wind?

https://youtu.be/jyQwgBAaBag  
  

[Vo]: uap report out

2021-06-27 Thread Jones Beene
Frank - Don't you love the way the brass likes to exert a bit of unnecessary 
control every story by ignoring the common designation (in wide use by the 
public - which is UFO) - and inserting their own name? 

Why invent "UAP" when UFO is equally unknown and ambiguous,  since it adds zero 
real info, other than a layer of confusion ?
The more interesting detail is that there is apparently some slight correlation 
between a few of the UAP/UFO sightings and Oumuamua
It is tempting to think of this strange intruder as akin to the "monolith" in 
"2001" - you know the one.

A Possible Link between ‘Oumuamua and Unidentified Aerial Phenomena

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A Possible Link between ‘Oumuamua and Unidentified Aerial Phenomena

Avi Loeb

If some UAP turn out to be extraterrestrial technology, they could be dropping 
sensors for a subsequent craft to...
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Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-20 Thread Jones Beene
 Yes - The lack of clarity about what is being produced does not inspire 
confidence for the Norront investors.
However, in that confused situation - if the annihilation particles are actual, 
whatever they are, and do indeed catalyze deuterium fusion, as they claim -- 
then we are still on the cusp of a new age of cheap energy, and ITER is an 
unneeded waste of resources.
But also the possibility that potassium is overlooked as a reactant - and could 
be utilized for a simpler form of energy is still very intriguing, no matter 
what else happens.


Axil Axil wrote:  
 
 Did you see this video?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZHVG5NYLyQ

Holmlid's replicators cannot identify the particles that Holmlid claims to be 
seeing. Also. the particles that show up in the cloud chamber happen to be 
strange radiation.
Jones Beene wrote:

This chart could lead to an interesting experiment - see Fig 4 of the paper 
below, which relates to the desorption energy of K at a graphite surface.
Imagine a few drops of water on a graphite plate -- H2O containing dissolved 
KCl -- and irradiated in an oven. Sparks may fly as water is split and 
recombined.

Would low energy microwaves be converted into ionizing UV ?
Perhaps  - according to the new paper by Holmlid

 
 



  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-20 Thread Jones Beene
This chart could lead to an interesting experiment - see Fig 4 of the paper 
below, which relates to the desorption energy of K at a graphite surface.
Imagine a few drops of water on a graphite plate -- H2O containing dissolved 
KCl -- and irradiated in an oven. Sparks may fly as water is split and 
recombined.

Would low energy microwaves be converted into ionizing UV ?
Perhaps  - according to the new paper by Holmlid

Production of ultra-dense hydrogen H(0): A novel nuclear fuel

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Production of ultra-dense hydrogen H(0): A novel nuclear fuel

Condensation of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (highly electronically excited) into the 
lowest energy state of condensed...
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Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-18 Thread Jones Beene
 Invoking a nebulous QM effect to explain a macro phenomenon is not really 
useful. 

All I see here is that you have proposed an imaginary explanation with little 
relevance to large scale activity in the real-world. Feynman would balk at this 
mis-interpretation of his ideas.

If there is to be elemental "transmutation" of non-fissile elements, which is 
normally extremely energetic, then there must be a real and testable underlying 
nuclear reaction and real data, but here with K and Na, none is proposed nor 
even imaginable. 

However...

In the case of potassium transmuting into calcium (Kervran effect), which 
stands in stark contrast to the situation with sodium, there is actually 
presented a real-world underlying nuclear reaction of lower energy, and with 
tons of real world evidence  - with which to support the surprising claim. 

But with vastly different atomic weights such as between sodium and potassium, 
there is no credible expectation of transmutation, and ... in the end... 
contamination is the most likely explanation.

--

Axil Axil wrote:  
 
 See my post above on this thread at
| 
 | Jun 12, 2021, 12:04 AM (5 days ago)






















 |


Transmutation never produces any particles, radiation or energy  is not 
knowable  because of quantum mechanical superposition and Feynman's Infinite 
Quantum Paths theory. The state of superposition is only completed until the 
transmutation has long been completed..for theory details 
seehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSFRN-ymfgE


On Thu, Jun 17, 2021 at 6:20 PM Jones Beene  wrote:

 Axil,
Wouldn't that kind of transmutation involve releasing two alphas from the K 
nucleus ?
AFAIK that would be unknown to physics ... or what kind or reaction are you 
suggesting?


Axil Axil wrote:  
 The sodium lines seen in the grape microwave experiment may have come from 
transmutation of potassium into sodium, Grapes don't contain much sodium: 2mg 
vs, 176mg per cup
 
 


  
  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-17 Thread Jones Beene
 Axil,
Wouldn't that kind of transmutation involve releasing two alphas from the K 
nucleus ?
AFAIK that would be unknown to physics ... or what kind or reaction are you 
suggesting?


Axil Axil wrote:  
 The sodium lines seen in the grape microwave experiment may have come from 
transmutation of potassium into sodium, Grapes don't contain much sodium: 2mg 
vs, 176mg per cup
 
 


  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-17 Thread Jones Beene
 The sparking phenomenon of KCl is partially explained by the "plasma grape" 
phenomenon, especially since grapes contain potassium and sodium. 

Here is a video of the grape effect - which goes part of the way to explain the 
more general case,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCrtk-pyP0I
At about 6:40 in the video Veritasium shows the emission spectrum of the plasma 
which is basically a spike of potassium with contribution of sodium. A further 
contribution from hydrinos is doubtful due to the absence of Lyman line 
broadening.

The self-focusing standing wave and internal reflection of the microwaves in 
grapes provide heat but no plasma since the GHz photons are non-ionizing, and 
essentially most of the plasma consists of potassium and sodium ions indicating 
that they are somehow activated. Since grapes contain sugar which ignites with 
the sparking - a situation of using no "fuel" (plain KCl solution) would be 
more impressive. 

A further refinement would be to fill a pair of tiny balloons (about the size 
of grapes) with a KCl solution then nuke them and compare that sparking to the 
grapes -- in order to gauge the contribution of "fuel" (sugars).

   --
 
 Potassium atoms are strongly sensitive to a magnetic field. This could relate 
to what is happening in the experiment where microwave radiation is applied to 
KCl  (at least in the sense of ultra strong coupling to the gigahertz waves 
from the oven.)

The most sensitive magnetometer available , named SERF - comes from Princeton 
and consists of a cell containing potassium vapor and a buffer gas. The 
unpaired electrons on the potassium atoms are spin-polarized so that a probe 
detects the precession of spin in the presence of a magnetic field. This device 
is capable of incredible sensitivities on the order of 10-18 Tesla, 1000 times 
more sensitive than a SQUID detector. 

Thus microwave radiation, already efficient, can be utilized in a more 
efficient way - perhaps becoming strongly ionizing and splitting water.

IOW it is possible that the extreme spin sensitivity of potassium to RF is a 
little understood effect -- maybe one looking for an application.

-

 
 I like the sound of "something strange going on."
Heck, it might be worthwhile to try various mixtures of KCl and NaCl to see if 
there is an obvious particular ratio where the sparking is maximized.
Mills uses a pinhole technique for finding UV where he actually drills a sub-mm 
hole into the reactor wall with line of sight to the plasma, and mounts and 
glues a photocell UV detector chip over the hole - but that is for a vacuum 
reactor.
Robin may have experience with this...?


 Michael Foster wrote:

Some of the sparking looks a little too far from the surface of the glass 
container to be contaminated by it and there's a lot of sodium spectrum being 
displayed. So something strange is going on, I think.
 
 
 

  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-15 Thread Jones Beene
Potassium atoms are strongly sensitive to a magnetic field. This could relate 
to what is happening in the experiment where microwave radiation is applied to 
KCl  (at least in the sense of ultra strong coupling to the gigahertz waves 
from the oven.)

The most sensitive magnetometer available , named SERF - comes from Princeton 
and consists of a cell containing potassium vapor and a buffer gas. The 
unpaired electrons on the potassium atoms are spin-polarized so that a probe 
detects the precession of spin in the presence of a magnetic field. This device 
is capable of incredible sensitivities on the order of 10-18 Tesla, 1000 times 
more sensitive than a SQUID detector. 

Thus microwave radiation, already efficient, can be utilized in a more 
efficient way - perhaps becoming strongly ionizing and splitting water.

IOW it is possible that the extreme spin sensitivity of potassium to RF is a 
little understood effect -- maybe one looking for an application.

-

 
 I like the sound of "something strange going on."
Heck, it might be worthwhile to try various mixtures of KCl and NaCl to see if 
there is an obvious particular ratio where the sparking is maximized.
Mills uses a pinhole technique for finding UV where he actually drills a sub-mm 
hole into the reactor wall with line of sight to the plasma, and mounts and 
glues a photocell UV detector chip over the hole - but that is for a vacuum 
reactor.
Robin may have experience with this...?


 Michael Foster wrote:

Some of the sparking looks a little too far from the surface of the glass 
container to be contaminated by it and there's a lot of sodium spectrum being 
displayed. So something strange is going on, I think.
 
 
 



Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-15 Thread Jones Beene
I like the sound of "something strange going on."
Heck, it might be worthwhile to try various mixtures of KCl and NaCl to see if 
there is an obvious particular ratio where the sparking is maximized.
Mills uses a pinhole technique for finding UV where he actually drills a sub-mm 
hole into the reactor wall with line of sight to the plasma, and mounts and 
glues a photocell UV detector chip over the hole - but that is for a vacuum 
reactor.
Robin may have experience with this...?


 Michael Foster wrote:

Some of the sparking looks a little too far from the surface of the glass 
container to be contaminated by it and there's a lot of sodium spectrum being 
displayed. So something strange is going on, I think.
 
 
 

  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-11 Thread Jones Beene
Worth mentioning is this - the experiment using radiation in the radio wave 
spectrum to excite an alkali dissolved in water is similar to the device 
invented by John Kanzius. This invention was initially used to treat cancer but 
could also split water and ignite the gas in a flame, which was quite 
impressive. 

Unfortunately the device proved to be not gainful, although it was very 
efficient. It used RF in the megahertz range, which was resonant with sodium.
Using microwave irradiation with potassium has the potential to be gainful - to 
the extent Mills theory is correct, even if the Kanzius device was not. 
Apparently resonance is involved with KCl too.

It would be rather amusing if an amazingly simply way to apply the hydrino 
theory turns up inadvertently on the internet, which Mills has himself 
completely missed.



Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-11 Thread Jones Beene
Most interesting, Michael.  It would be even more so (to Mills' investors :-)  
... if there had been some of the Mills' UV lines as predicted - 27.2 eV , 13.6 
eV and so on.

Did you see any UV lines at all?



Michael Foster wrote:
  
  I tried this and it looks really kewl indeed. The potassium chloride I used 
was pure enough that if you do a simple flame test, you don't get any of that 
yellow-orange sodium color. I watched the sparking with a 1500 lpm diffraction 
grating and the double D lines of sodium are way too bright to be accounted for 
from the potassium chloride. So it's either transmutation (unlikely), or the 
energy produced by the sparking is enough to remove some sodium from the wall 
of the glass container.
 
 I didn't see any of the characteristic hydrino spectral lines :-)
 
 
  
  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-09 Thread Jones Beene
 There is no fusion taking place in this video. No transmutation either.

There is a mundane explanation for the magnetism.


Axil Axilwrote:  
 
 Dr George Egely  generates transmutation using a microwave.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ms411WCBEZk


  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-09 Thread Jones Beene
 Hope it is at least a kilowatt oven as high power may be important...

Terry Blanton  wrote:  

FWIW - I ran across a simple experiment while looking around for a science fair 
project for a neighbor's son ...

Kewl.  I think I still have the old microwave in the basement that I used to 
make ball lightning using a candle.  I'll give it a shot if it works still.   

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-09 Thread Jones Beene
 Once formed, the EVO could possibly be pumped with energy from microwaves or 
other forms of radiation --but--  AFAIK the actual formation of the EVO itself 
takes place only on a "special" electrode, which actually is the key to 
Shoulder's work (and former trade secret).
Sounds like someone may be trying to conflate with Shoulder's EVO and a 
different phenomenon.

Axil Axil wrote:  
 
 Microwaves delever energy to the EVOs "wirelessly" (without electodes). If you 
need references to beleive this I will supply some.    

  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-09 Thread Jones Beene
 AFAIK the EVO would necessarily form on an electrode - but there isn't any 
corresponding electrode in this experiment unless I missed something.

Axil Axil wrote:  
 This could be related to the way potassium generates clusters of Rydberg 
matter as per Holmlid and catalyzes the production of EVOs. The EVOs grow until 
the point of instability whereupon they explode in a bosenova. If this is 
happening, there would be X-rays produced by the bosenova as the high energy 
electrons produce Bremsstrahlung while undergoing thermalization. The use of 
self developing dental X-ray film would be a proper detection method for those 
X-rays.

buy self developing dental X-ray film here

self developing dental X-ray film

The size of the spark looks about right for a 500 Gev Bosenova.

Jones Beene wrote:

Good question. In the early days Mills focused on potassium as a necessary 
catalyst for working with nickel electrolysis - and which which we now learn 
will apparently both split water and produce a plasma with microwave 
irradiation, while sodium will not. So - this experiment kind of fits into 
Mills' theory even though he never used RF to any great extent. 

One can imagine improvements to this which could possibly provide much more 
information. This is actually more complex than it seems at first. I am amazed 
that apparently water is being split by the oven - or is there an alternative 
explanation?


Axil Axil wrote:  
 
 Interesting. What is ypur take about the theory behind the production of 
sparks? Why Hydrinos?
Jones Beene wrote:

FWIW - I ran across a simple experiment while looking around for a science fair 
project for a neighbor's son ... 

There are not many experiments which are both robust, cheap and don't require 
complex data logging to suggest the energy anomaly. One needs to find a 
discarded microwave oven of course...

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=74572



  
  

Re: [Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-09 Thread Jones Beene
Good question. In the early days Mills focused on potassium as a necessary 
catalyst for working with nickel electrolysis - and which which we now learn 
will apparently both split water and produce a plasma with microwave 
irradiation, while sodium will not. So - this experiment kind of fits into 
Mills' theory even though he never used RF to any great extent. 

One can imagine improvements to this which could possibly provide much more 
information. This is actually more complex than it seems at first. I am amazed 
that apparently water is being split by the oven - or is there an alternative 
explanation?


Axil Axil wrote:  
 
 Interesting. What is ypur take about the theory behind the production of 
sparks? Why Hydrinos?
On Wed, Jun 9, 2021 at 9:30 PM Jones Beene  wrote:

FWIW - I ran across a simple experiment while looking around for a science fair 
project for a neighbor's son ... 

There are not many experiments which are both robust, cheap and don't require 
complex data logging to suggest the energy anomaly. One needs to find a 
discarded microwave oven of course...

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=74572



  

[Vo]:Hydrino validation?

2021-06-09 Thread Jones Beene
FWIW - I ran across a simple experiment while looking around for a science fair 
project for a neighbor's son ... 

There are not many experiments which are both robust, cheap and don't require 
complex data logging to suggest the energy anomaly. One needs to find a 
discarded microwave oven of course...

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=74572




Re: [Vo]:wind powered vehicles

2021-06-07 Thread Jones Beene
 FWIW - The same poster has put up a video or two concerning the Dzhanibekov 
Effect - which is fascinating in its own right - not well known, and possibly 
not fully characterized since it seems to demand more than one (and preferably 
three) interacting axes of rotation. 

Veritas  neglects to mention this oddball effect in the wind power situation, 
for the obvious reason that there is apparently only one axis of rotation which 
is the fan blades. 

... but ... 

what if the a similar effect (to Dzhanibekov ) relates to having one major axis 
of rotation plus one or more truncated axes, which maybe manifest as vibration 
?  This relates to the spinning satellite with the whip antennae which will 
flip-flop... (to the embarrassment of NASA)

   H LV wrote:   Is it possible for a wind powered vehicle to move faster than 
the wind while it is moving in the same direction as the wind?

https://youtu.be/jyQwgBAaBag  

Re: [Vo]:Hrm. Sarfatti, Podkletnov, Pais(Navy), Ning Li(China)

2021-06-04 Thread Jones Beene
 Nick would say: you must "cut 'em off at the past"


Terry Blanton wrote:  
> Prophetic, Firesign Theatre was: "How can you be two places at once when 
> you're not anywhere at all?" 

Cheers!  

Re: Dave Beaty Re: [Vo]:ufo report to be coming out in a month

2021-05-24 Thread Jones Beene
Coincidentally - this turned up in the morning's news feed...

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/when-lab-experiments-carry-theological-implications

Looking beyond so-called 'common sense' and/or 'scientific proof' - in the 
broader debate over the reality of ET phenomena - there is no valid reason to 
deny that what we may denote s a "UFO" event is in fact both real but also 
completely non-physical in our 3-space ... which echoes an earlier observation 
in this thread.





Re: Dave Beaty Re: [Vo]:ufo report to be coming out in a month

2021-05-21 Thread Jones Beene
 Even for those of us seriously doubt (that any ET visitation has occurred in 
the past history of mankind) - we can nevertheless enjoy speculation about what 
exactly - such a visitation would look like, if or when it actually happened. 
This exercise has significant entertainment value, if nothing else.
Start with this question - "can ET spell "Poughkeepsie" ? ... and who cares if 
they can't.

Basically, the situation which would logically be the "ET default" - is that 
alien contact would be "one way" and  planned to be unobtrusive to all. Unless 
we dig much deeper and look along the fringes we find nothing. IOW we should 
never notice ET contact at all, especially in the form that Hollywood has 
suggested - but might find it, especially if things (for them) had NOT gone as 
planned. 

This reasoning is based on the logic and expectation of of what we earthlings 
will most likely do in the far future, when we are technologically capable to 
reach out to the stars. Logic should be the defining issue - not drama. 

Furthermore, that surely means that an expected need of any putative ET 
mission, having traversed hundreds of light years of space/time to get here - 
would logically be to refuel - right? Well this refueling process should be 
unobtrusive as well - especially if it consists of hydrogen or deuterium. Such 
a fuel deficit would be able to be met from one of the "gas giants" and 
earthing would be unaware. Maybe a little palladium, who knows?

However if contact with us has occurred - and this is a huge "if" - the 
situation could be that the ET recon mission would have suffered repairable 
damage in transit. 

In that case, the most likely thing ET would need to continue their mission is 
replacement of advanced chips and electronics. To get these parts, however, 
they might first need to intervene somehow in the normal process of R on 
earth by influencing progress and directing it in a certain way to meet their 
needs, not ours.

That would be one way to look at the rapid rise of quantum computing in recent 
years. In some ways, this progress in an arcane pursuit, with little market 
incentive, seems to have been "out of the normal context" of historical trends. 
Thank you IBM.

In short, if there was to be a bounty to be offered to "find ET" based on the 
logic of what they would need from us humans - my bet would be that the best 
place to look would be in the field of quantum computing and AI, and a good 
start would be either at IBM or (even more alarming from the US perspective) at 
the Chinese effort to advance quantum computing... or possibly at the 
interaction between the two.
"Food" for thought?

Jones

H LV wrote: Terry Blanton wrote:





ARE WE FOOD OR ARE WE PETS?


Food for their pets.
Harry  

Re: [Vo]:"muon catalyzed fission"

2021-04-26 Thread Jones Beene
 Robin wrote:  
 > Assuming a radius of 10 fm for the nucleus of a Uranium atom, to which a 
 > negative muon would be attracted, and thus gain
kinetic energy, coming from "infinitely" far away, the muon would gain about 13 
MeV of kinetic energy. That's more than
enough to fission even U238 (or any actinide for that matter) directly.
Which means thorium is in play... (India has a lot of thorium and could be an 
early adopter)

> So whether the muons are created by a proton beam or from UDH probably 
> wouldn't make any difference.
This would result in complete "burn up" of Uranium in the reactor, leaving no 
long lived actinide waste.

Yes, the argument could be made that muon catalyzed fission despite the name - 
is in fact, cleaner than fusion. So the bottom line is still the same: "does 
the Holmlid effect, and/or the Norront implementation of same, really produce a 
flux of ultra cheap muons ? ... as is the claim. Norront is pursuing muon 
catalyzed fusion (which is probably NOT the best utilization of muons, given 
the high cost of heavy water) but it is not too late to change horses.

Putting all the details in perspective - both scientific and economic - India 
see,s like the perfect place to implement a muon catalyzed thorium fission 
reactor. What is the downside, other than to the purveyors of traditional 
fission of enriched U?

Let's hope India can first survive the pandemic... and second that Bill Gates 
or another benefactor gets wind of this...


  

Re: [Vo]:"muon catalyzed fission"

2021-04-25 Thread Jones Beene
 "Sticking" is a problem with muon catalyzed fusion, but with fission as far as 
I know, this was not a major issue as there is a great excess of muons from a 
GeV proton beam.

A lot of that work was done at Brookhaven 3-4 decades ago. I'm sure the details 
are in old issues of Fusion Technology but I haven't looked into all of the 
differences so far, which would emerge from substituting UDH in the target and 
laser irradiation. Here is a citation for the old work, but there are probably 
better ones out there.

https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6991700
In fact, the details of how UDH would differ from fast protons in the equation, 
are totally speculative at this point. 

With accelerator driven fission you are accelerating protons and making huge 
amounts of muons in the target as a bonus. The dynamics would be much different 
with dense hydrogen instead of fast protons.

Also - with the Holmlid effect, presumably the fuel would need to be U-Hydride 
which fortunately is stable at high temperatures, and muons would catalyze the 
molecular proton overcoming Coulomb repulsion and into the U nucleus - somewhat 
like the Oppenheimer-Philips effect, following which one or more neutrons are 
freed and the non-fissile U238 become fissile Pu.

It is a fascinating prospect and hopefully more info will be found, but of 
course most physicists are not buying into UDH yet and apparently he is not 
cognizant of this possibility.
Jones


Gary Steckly wrote:  
 
 Wasn't there a problem with "sticking"? 
Each muon wasted to much of its short life hanging around after completing each 
reaction? 
Steve Jones was the expert on this.  Wonder if he's still around lurking? 
Best regards 
Gary 

Jones Beene wrote:

This is not a typo - in fact muons can catalyze fission as well as fusion.
Holmlid devotees should take notice of this opportunity.

Decades ago, government Labs were looking at accelerator driven fission 
using massive beam lines and un-enriched fuel, but this turned out to be 
economically nonviable due to the high cost of the beam line.
The big advantage however is that the scheme allows the complete burnup 
of waste and the breeding of fissile material so that if (BIG IF) one can avoid 
the 
massive expense of the beam line (which costs twice as much as the reactor 
itself) 
then there could be a huge economic benefit in a new approach. 

Having a subcritical reactor also cuts that hardware cost by 75% over what we 
now are stuck with - which is,in effect a "controlled bomb" poised on the edge 
of 
catastrophe.

Thus - if one can provide a cheap source of muons without the beam line - such 
as 
via the Holmlid effect, then this route could be highly preferable to muon 
catalyzed 
fusion - both in cost and and in eliminating waste.
If this idea has not been patented, then let me now dedicate it to the public 
domain.

  

[Vo]:"muon catalyzed fission"

2021-04-24 Thread Jones Beene
This is not a typo - in fact muons can catalyze fission as well as fusion.
Holmlid devotees should take notice of this opportunity.

Decades ago, government Labs were looking at accelerator driven fission 
using massive beam lines and un-enriched fuel, but this turned out to be 
economically nonviable due to the high cost of the beam line.
The big advantage however is that the scheme allows the complete burnup 
of waste and the breeding of fissile material so that if (BIG IF) one can avoid 
the 
massive expense of the beam line (which costs twice as much as the reactor 
itself) 
then there could be a huge economic benefit in a new approach. 

Having a subcritical reactor also cuts that hardware cost by 75% over what we 
now are stuck with - which is,in effect a "controlled bomb" poised on the edge 
of 
catastrophe.

Thus - if one can provide a cheap source of muons without the beam line - such 
as 
via the Holmlid effect, then this route could be highly preferable to muon 
catalyzed 
fusion - both in cost and and in eliminating waste.
If this idea has not been patented, then let me now dedicate it to the public 
domain.


Re: [Vo]:Coincidence ?

2021-04-18 Thread Jones Beene
 Robin
Among the interesting things that turn up on google in this regard is
 https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1429741
GV Lopez  2017  — A resonant multiphoton ionization process in molecular 
hydrogen ... caused by intense laser fields from the non-resonant 532 nm laser.
"Non resonance causing resonance" - now that's intriguing 
(I have not read it yet)
More later

Robin wrote:  
 In reply to  Jones Beene's message of Sun, 18 Apr 2021 
Hi Jones,

As you guessed, that's why I asked how sharp the peak was. ;)
[snip]
Regards,

Robin van Spaandonk


  

Re: [Vo]:Coincidence ?

2021-04-18 Thread Jones Beene
 A photon with a wavelength of 532 nm (green light) would have an energy of 
approximately 2.33 eV and the ionization potential of hydrogen is 13.6 eV  - 
but insofar as possible resonance between the two values, this is not that 
close of a fit since 6 * 2.33 = 13.98. Sixfold symmetry often turns up with 
hydrogen and hydrocarbons
Perhaps there is another connection


Robin wrote:  (in re Michael Foster)
 
> Ok, here's another coincidence. For years I have been using a photopolymer 
> whose quantum yield is far over unity. This is a formulation I discovered by 
> a lot of experimenting. I use this in my work, so it remains and will remain 
> a trade secret. And the preferred wavelength iswait for it532 nm. 

I doubt if this is a related phenomenon, but who knows?
[snip]
Regards,

Robin van Spaandonk 

  

Re: [Vo]:Coincidence ?

2021-04-17 Thread Jones Beene
 It would be helpful to know if they tried the available wavelengths of lasers 
and chose the best ... as this seems like one of those details which should be 
high priority... 

Axil Axil wrote:  
 
 I heard from Sveinn Ólafsson that Holmlid can also activate the ultra dense 
hydrogen by using a spark.
Jones Beene wrote:

Holmlid notably uses laser pulses in the 532 nm spectra to form ultra dense 
hydrogen or deuterium.
As it turns out, the same greenish spectra of the laser has also been used to 
form the breakthrough material which has been called "the first room 
temperature superconductor" a few months ago ( Note that there have been 
numerous other strong claims for this breakthrough before, but Wiki sez this 
one is the first - although it is not clear who has replicated the work).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonaceous_sulfur_hydride
Anyway ... the point of this post being that laser irradiation at this exact 
frequency 532 nm also turns up in another disparate situations where hydrogen 
densification is apparent.
Previously with the Holmlid work, observers  thought or assumed that the 
greenis laser spectra related to irradiation of the catalyst, not the hydrogen 
itself. 

The RTSC work would seem to indicate that it is the hydrogen which is 
responding to the photons not the catalyst, which although coherent (the 
wavelength) is spatially way out of proportion to interact with atoms of 
hydrogen... many orders of magnitude difference, in fact.

Somehow, I get the strange feeling that this detail - the identical laser 
wavelength used to activate hydrogen, is not coincidental...
Jones

  

[Vo]:Coincidence ?

2021-04-17 Thread Jones Beene
Holmlid notably uses laser pulses in the 532 nm spectra to form ultra dense 
hydrogen or deuterium.
As it turns out, the same greenish spectra of the laser has also been used to 
form the breakthrough material which has been called "the first room 
temperature superconductor" a few months ago ( Note that there have been 
numerous other strong claims for this breakthrough before, but Wiki sez this 
one is the first - although it is not clear who has replicated the work).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonaceous_sulfur_hydride
Anyway ... the point of this post being that laser irradiation at this exact 
frequency 532 nm also turns up in another disparate situations where hydrogen 
densification is apparent.
Previously with the Holmlid work, observers  thought or assumed that the 
greenis laser spectra related to irradiation of the catalyst, not the hydrogen 
itself. 

The RTSC work would seem to indicate that it is the hydrogen which is 
responding to the photons not the catalyst, which although coherent (the 
wavelength) is spatially way out of proportion to interact with atoms of 
hydrogen... many orders of magnitude difference, in fact.

Somehow, I get the strange feeling that this detail - the identical laser 
wavelength used to activate hydrogen, is not coincidental...
Jones


Re: [Vo]:Carbon transmutation video?

2021-04-14 Thread Jones Beene
 Why rhodium?
There are reports of Rh showing up in cold fusion electrodes after many hours 
of use, but of course Pd is not "cheap".  Wiki shows two routes this could 
happen.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopes_of_palladium
A lower cost potential starting candidate would be silver which is much cheaper 
than Pd but not cheap.
Silver activation in a nuclear reactor will give some Rh but it is far more 
costly than natural.


On Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 9:14:07 AM PDT, Chris Zell 
 wrote:  
 
 I wish there was a way to use Cold Fusion to transmute something cheap into 
rhodium.

That way, we could use it to become freakin' rich heretics and tell them to go 
screw themselves..

  

Re: [Vo]:Muons: 'Strong' evidence found for a new force of nature

2021-04-08 Thread Jones Beene
 It is possible that whatever it is Cambridge may have found relative to muons 
also relates to surprisingly efficient muon production in the Holmlid/Norront 
reactor... apparently there is a mystery particle which affects muons in a 
previously unknown way ? 

BTW from their site, Norront have 3 muon reactors working in Norway and one in 
Sweden. 

Things are getting interesting...

This whole UDD > muon thing may be near, or even gone past the proverbial 
"tipping point"... when we look back on it in a couple of years.

Jones


H LV wrote:  
 PBS Space Time
Why the Muon g-2 Results Are So Exciting!
https://youtu.be/O4Ko7NW2yQo
Harry
Muons: 'Strong' evidence found for a new force of natur

https://www.bbc.com/news/56643677

quotes:

There is currently a one in a 40,000 chance that the result could be a 
statistical fluke - equating to a statistical level of confidence described as 
4.1 sigma.
A level of 5 sigma, or a one in 3.5 million chance of the observation being a 
coincidence, is needed to claim a discovery.

Prof Ben Allanach, from Cambridge University, who was not involved with the 
latest effort, said: "My Spidey sense is tingling and telling me that this is 
going to be real.

The Muon g-2 experiment involves sending the particles around a 14-metre ring 
and then applying a magnetic field. Under the current laws of physics, encoded 
in the Standard Model, this should make the muons wobble at a certain rate.

Instead, the scientists found that muons wobbled at a faster rate than 
expected. This might be caused by a force of nature that's completely new to 
science.Harry



  

[Vo]:Valuation-wise - Is Norront the new Tesla (3000% gain in the first 10 years) ?

2021-04-08 Thread Jones Beene
https://www.businessinsider.com/how-tesla-stock-went-up-since-ipo-timeline-2020-6

Some might argue that Norront fusion is the real-deal - and is well-positioned 
- perhaps to do even better than Tesla following their IPO a decade ago ... 








Re: [Vo]:OT: Nissan e-POWER technology explained

2021-04-05 Thread Jones Beene
 I agree that this approach makes a lot more sense than a massive battery pack 
- Tesla notwithstanding.

The approach is not new but has never been carried out sensibly ... before now.


H LV wrote:  
 Some people think the e-Power concept is silly.
But I think it is just right for the times we live in. It is currently 
available in Japan,
but not in NA.

https://youtu.be/T5wCppCiQE8

Harry  

Re: [Vo]:A photo of an EVO on the fly

2021-03-28 Thread Jones Beene
 Bob,
Yes. Lets hear where this comes from. 

IMO this is completely fake insofar as it relates to Shoulders' work..

Jones

Bob Higgins wrote:  
 
 Axil, what is the provenance of this photo/gif anim?
On Sun, Mar 28, 2021 at 5:41 PM Axil Axil  wrote:

An apparently spiral looking track emerges from the highly excited gap between 
two brass plates. The EVO is the root cause of strange radiation tracks.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1VfOeYYPFVGTrIXP2ovvFMqpXpaJo3fDg/view

  

[Vo]:Muons in the News

2021-01-28 Thread Jones Beene
This extremely expensive research could eventually affect LENR, unbeknownst to 
almost everyone... 

... assuming that Holmlid's theory is at least partially correct.
Many of us had hoped to see a ray of progress from Norront by now. AFAIK there 
has been nothing from them of great importance. Maybe they got the laser 
frequency wrong?
However, the idea that the laser frequency is the factor that makes all the 
difference was not even promoted by Holmlid so it could be a red herring.
BTW "what's the frequency, Kenneth?"


The cloak-and-dagger tale behind this year’s most anticipated result in 
particle physics

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The cloak-and-dagger tale behind this year’s most anticipated result in ...

Locked cabinets, a secret frequency, and the curious magnetism of a particle 
called the muon
 |

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Re: [Vo]:The Higgs polariton

2021-01-26 Thread Jones Beene
 FWIW - This story in today's SciNews supports a three wave structure in 
superconductivity

https://phys.org/news/2021-01-class-superconductors.html
 ... "s- wave, p-wave and d-wave channels" ...

Jones



Jürg Wyttenbach wrote:  
  
>From the SO(4) model it is clear that the electron is a resonance of the 
>proton. In the bound (ground) state there is no electron as we know it from 
>the unbound state.
 
The electron unfolds in three steps as it is a three wave structure that breaks 
up.
 
This picture only works for Hydrogen. In all other nuclei we have complex flux 
interactions among shell electron waves.
 
 
J.W.
 

   

Re: [Vo]:Updated Gordon, F. Lattice Energy Converter (LEC)

2021-01-24 Thread Jones Beene
 This fine paper and particularly the video present a promising line of 
reproducible experiment that is sure to enlist further researchers - since if 
portends direct conversion of heat into electricity and notably also furthers 
the long-standing quest to identify the "mystery radiation"...
One guess for this mystery is that the radiation is simply EUV - which is the 
result of hydrogen densification according to several theories ... however that 
kind of radiation should not be able to fog external film. However, It could be 
that some metals are actually semi-transparent to EUV or become so over time, 
and we are not aware of that feature since typically all UV is absorbed by 
metals.



Jed Rothwell wrote: 
 
 I uploaded a new version of this paper:

Gordon, F. and H.J. Whitehouse, Lattice Energy Converter (LEC) (PowerPoint 
slides), in LENR Workshop in memory of Dr. M. Srinivasan. 2021: Indian 
Institute of Technology Kanpur.

https://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/GordonFlatticeene.pdf

I added the Presentation Notes from the PowerPoint slides. The Acrobat 
conversion was supposed to include these notes, but it didn't work. I had to 
transfer them manually.

The video of this presentation is here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4dzTWY_aWM=youtu.be

The version of the presentation given during the conference is in the Session 3 
video starting at minute 37:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bd6JCbnYuaU=youtu.be

  

Re: [Vo]:Anomalous loading of H2

2021-01-10 Thread Jones Beene
 Bob
Cerium is the most common lanthanide and is actually inexpensive in quantity. 

The prime application for the so-called "superhydrides" like CeH9+ seems to be 
superconductivity. 

However the extremely high "loading" could indicate LENR is facilitated.Pd only 
goes to 1:1

Here is an article of interest that uses Ce at "only" 9:1 loading.

Scientists create 'impossible' superconductor CeH9 after bending the rules of 
chemistry

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Scientists create 'impossible' superconductor CeH9 after bending the rul...

By managing to capture a cerium atom in a lattice of 29 hydrogen atoms, the 
researchers say they have bent the r...
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     bobcook wrote:  
Ce is more  valuable    than  most metals IMHO.  Nano particles of Ce and   H 
or D may allow fusion to occur or otter t transmutations.  The NASNO particle 
may be an  entangled  system can under go a phase change  with a swap of 
potential  for kenotic energy and conservation of spin  and angular momentum.
 
  
 
Bob Cook
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

  
 
From: Jones Beene
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 6:42 PM
To: vortex
Subject: [Vo]:Anomalous loading of H2

  
 
This seems quite remarkable if true - hydrogen loading ratio 16:1 with cerium
 
"Insight into anomalous hydrogen adsorption" Shreeja Das, et al 
 
Hydrogen interaction with metal atoms is of prime focus for many energy related 
applications... but its binding properties with lanthanides are not well 
reported. In this article, by density functional theory studies, we show how a 
rare earth metal, cerium, binds with hydrogen...Each cerium atom is found to 
bind eight hydrogen molecules which is a much higher number than has been 
reported for transition metal atoms.
 
DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01835J (Paper) RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 12929-12940


 
  
 
  
   

[Vo]:Anomalous loading of H2

2021-01-09 Thread Jones Beene

This seems quite remarkable if true -hydrogen loading ratio 16:1 with cerium
"Insight into anomalous hydrogen adsorption" Shreeja Das, et al
Hydrogen interaction withmetal atoms is of prime focus for many energy related 
applications... but itsbinding properties with lanthanides are not well 
reported. In this article, bydensity functional theory studies, we show how a 
rare earth metal, cerium,binds with hydrogen... Each cerium atom is found to 
bind eight hydrogenmolecules which is a much higher number than has been 
reported fortransition metal atoms.
DOI: 10.1039/D0RA01835J (Paper) RSC Adv., 2020, 10, 12929-12940



[Vo]:BLP really "bombs out" this time

2020-12-19 Thread Jones Beene
Last month, with little fanfare or press coverage, BLP released some of its 
more impressive claims ever. The PDF is here:
https://brilliantlightpower.com/presentations/Analytical_Presentation.pdf
It is a large file - over 100 pages with images - but of course much of the 
technology has already been dropped or altered, perhaps for the latest round of 
investor funding. Sadly, however, one finding may benefit others in the World - 
more than the USA is willing to admit, and for an almost hidden reason. The 
experiment in question could prove the Mills theory beyond doubt ... to the 
Pentagon, at least. On page 10 of the citation above, Mills presents a double 
surprise - in that it was first published in China ! 

Here is that cite: R. Mills, Y. Lu, R. Frazer, “Power Determination and Hydrino 
Product Characterization of Ultralow Field Ignition of Hydrated Silver Shots”, 
Chinese Journal of Physics, Vol. 56, (2018), pp1667-1717.
BLP essentially (and naively) appears to shows anyone who is interested the 
early stages of how to produce a "hydrino bomb" using a silver catalyst. Of 
course on first look, such a weapon is not nearly as devastating as your 
typical atomic fission bomb (by many orders of magnitude). Presumably that fact 
makes the weaponization of hydinos a negligible risk.

However, the shockwave is another matter since it is said to be a factor of 10X 
more energy dense than chemical. QUOTE: "Based on the shockwave propagation 
velocity and the corresponding pressure, the high-current ignition of water in 
a silver matrix was measured to produce a shock wave that was equivalent to 
about 10 times more moles of gunpowder.
What is glossed over is that an explosive of only a factor if 10 more energy 
than chemical energy can produce a nuclear fusion reaction - and without the 
need for fissile material. This has been arguably proved already and is called 
the "fourth generation" of atomic weapons. Top secret. 

The bottom line is that spherical convergence is a "shockwave multiplier." The 
pure fusion weapon (see Wiki) does not require a fissile "primary" to ignite 
deuterium - only converging shockwaves. Thus the easiest way to control 
proliferation (by fissile inventory) becomes worthless. That makes any ultra 
high energy chemical explosive - like the Mills' silver bullet hydrino bomb - 
potentially horrendous. 

As for the near future, we can ask - is it coincidental that Mills has shifted 
gears and now does not promote silver as a catalyst? Nor does he ever mention 
the bomb. Is that in response to high level directives?

Well, the good news is that Mills has been so wrong, so often in the past 30 
years, that the hydrino bomb is likely to be only so much hot air. 

Where is Inspector Clouseau when we need him?



 



Re: [Vo]:superluminal mind

2020-12-11 Thread Jones Beene
 Sean,
REF: https://spaz.org/~magi/
... hope this is not off-topic
Have you tried setting up a pair of identical nested tubes - one as transmitter 
and one as receiver, separated by significant distance - in order to see if 
there is unusual efficiency in transmitting power?
The lore of "longitudinal/scalar waves" seems strangely applicable to this 
design. Also - how does the resonant frequency scale with smaller and smaller 
geometry? 

It would be a huge challenge to reduce the structure to micro or nano geometry 
for lithography but maybe not impossible. Heck perhaps the operative mechanism 
can itself be fractalized


Re: [Vo]:Kubrick is smiling from the other side

2020-11-24 Thread Jones Beene
 On close inspection the "monolith" shows evidence of having been assembled 
with pop rivets...
Otherwise it is rather surreal.

... not to say that ET doesn't have access to a supply of pop rivets...


Terry Blanton wrote:  
 
 Queue "Thus Spake Zarathustra" https://youtu.be/ThY8FKKMN04

https://www.davidzwirner.com/exhibitions/new-works-bronze-and-steel

Brother, can you spare a syzygy?
Jones Beene wrote:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/news/2020/11/24/utah-red-rock-country-metal-monolith-discovered-remote-area/6405523002/



  

[Vo]:Kubrick is smiling from the other side

2020-11-24 Thread Jones Beene
https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/news/2020/11/24/utah-red-rock-country-metal-monolith-discovered-remote-area/6405523002/




Re: [Vo]:A cup of coffee and the history of heat

2020-11-15 Thread Jones Beene
H LV wrote: 
 Using a cup of coffee as a starting point this blogger provides a friendly 
introduction to the history of the science of heat. He also leaves the reader 
with an open question.
https://www.beanthinking.org/?tag=caloric

Harry
Well-named article... even though it chooses to ignore implications of 
"negative temperature" (below zero K). 

And why not? It is a contentious subject. Here is an older Science News article 
which touches on negative temperature.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130104143516.htm
But ... for the sake of argument, imagine that a simple experiment determines 
two things about the special type of hydrogen which is formed via the 
Holmlid/Mills effect - which effect results in a dense hydrogen species that 
should be useful in its own right, even after giving up anomalous heat. This 
would be a second use of the Holmlid effect.

Furthermore let's assume that one characteristic of this H* gas (besides higher 
density) is that the atoms do not repel each other as does normal hydrogen -- 
since electrons have been catalytically moved into stable lower orbitals  - 
which make the apparent nuclear charge more positive than before to its 
surroundings (due to the negative near-field of orbital electrons being 
compressed. Thus. thus dense H clusters can be easily formed. Even if the 
effect of negative temperature is weak, it points the way to a simple energy 
anomaly in thermal conversion efficiency .

Proposed application of negative temperature effect: It could be possible such 
a dense hydrogen gas, mixed together with an inert gas like Argon (which atoms 
do repel one another) -- to construct a new type of Sterling piston engine 
which is extremely efficient, perhaps twice the Carnot efficiency using only 
solar heat, since there is an effective heat sink available from within the gas 
itself - which can be used to harness a bit of negative temperature.

Of course, this is assuming that "negative temperature" and dense hydrogen are 
both real and interrelated.

The bottom line is that atoms of dense hydrogen would tend to exert a negative 
instead of a positive pressure when heated. As a consequence, the atoms for a 
dense cloud which "wants to contract" when thermal input and this is balanced 
against the Argon component, which is more like a perfect gas. For this to work 
there would probably need to be a permeable membrane to separate the two gas, 
but there are a few good candidates for this.

Maybe this is a product of too much coffee...

  

Re: [Vo]:Acoustic demonstration of beats

2020-10-21 Thread Jones Beene
Don,
Very interesting. Was the work published? 

Sounds like a long lost missed opportunity for something...



> Here's FYI of something similar, Jones, et al.
 
 
When I was young and dumber I knew of a Dr. Cameron Jones who no longer works 
at Swinburne Uni. where he diluted colloidal gold to the proper density to get 
the correct spacing that entertained a plasmon resonance when painted on a 
surface.
 
He painted CD ROMs with this gold-dot 'plasmonic surface' and the CD diode read 
laser plasmon information as visual image alterations. The Doctor suggested the 
skew indicated the plasmon resonance had a knowledge of the architecture of the 
image encoded in the CD dot-track.  But there were echos of other dot-tracks 
evident in the images I saw posted.   The technique does make and detect 
plasmon resonance.
 
 
In the 90-s.  Then he retired from academics to run the Blue Velvet night club.
 

 
 
-don
 
 On 10/21/2020 12:44 PM, JonesBeene wrote:
  
The possibility of an energy anomaly based on gold plasmons from nanoparticles 
being  irradiated by lasers –using  beat frequency or not - leads to an idea 
for a simple low cost experiment.
 
 
 
Gold nanoparticle colloids are available at remarkably low prices due to 
growing use as cure-all dietary supplements. 
 
 
 
Obviously you don’t get much gold for $20 bucks on Amazon but your don’t need 
much.
  
A drop of Pure Nano Colloidal Gold in water - 2oz Bottle 240ppm .999 Gold 
nanoparticles (on Amazon) would be interesting when irradiated by one or more 
small lasers. 
 
Add a little heavy water to the colloid and who knows what will turn up? This 
could happen on a microscope slide for instance – if you want a close up view.
  
 
  
 
  
 

Bob Higgins wrote: 

 
   
> Yes, the beats in the Hagelstein, Letts, and Cravens experiment are 
> presumably formed by this process.  A thin gold film was deposited on the 
> cathode surface and the effect was not observed without the thin gold film. 
   
 
   
Has it been ruled out that the energy anomaly is not partly or solely due to 
plasmon formation alone ?
   
 
   
> It is believed that the thin gold went down as tiny islands that were 
> responsible for the nonlinearity needed to form the beats.
   
 
   
If the "islands" were in the size range of 2-12 nm,  then the Casimir effect 
could come into play. The so-called "Wood's Anomalies" have been known for a 
century in various forms - and this plasmon anomaly of Hagelstein et al could 
be related to that.
   
 
   
https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Chapter-2-Theory-of-Wood-%E2%80%99-s-Anomalies-Maystre/406d2c8f212c3286d85774815de62a2c75b748b8
   
 
   
IOW there is a possibility of actual energy gain from plasmon radiation alone 
which may or may not also have a nuclear effect as a secondary reaction when 
deuterium is present.
   
 
   

Re: [Vo]:Acoustic demonstration of beats

2020-10-21 Thread Jones Beene
 Bob Higgins wrote: 
 > Yes, the beats in the Hagelstein, Letts, and Cravens experiment are 
 > presumably formed by this process.  A thin gold film was deposited on the 
 > cathode surface and the effect was not observed without the thin gold film. 
 
Has it been ruled out that the energy anomaly is not partly or solely due to 
plasmon formation alone ?
> It is believed that the thin gold went down as tiny islands that were 
> responsible for the nonlinearity needed to form the beats.
If the "islands" were in the size range of 2-12 nm,  then the Casimir effect 
could come into play. The so-called "Wood's Anomalies" have been known for a 
century in various forms - and this plasmon anomaly of Hagelstein et al could 
be related to that.

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Chapter-2-Theory-of-Wood-%E2%80%99-s-Anomalies-Maystre/406d2c8f212c3286d85774815de62a2c75b748b8
IOW there is a possibility of actual energy gain from plasmon radiation alone 
which may or may not also have a nuclear effect as a secondary reaction when 
deuterium is present.


  

Re: [Vo]:Newton's rings fractal

2020-10-17 Thread Jones Beene
Moire effect in fractal...
Hmm... derivative of Newton's rings ?
 Moire Effect in Fractal 

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Moire Effect in Fractal


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Re: [Vo]:Acoustic demonstration of beats

2020-10-13 Thread Jones Beene
   AlanG wrote:  
 
  > Recent progress in THz lasers has made the heterodyne laser technique moot:
 
 https://phys.org/news/2020-06-breakthrough-multi-watt-terahertz-lasers.html
 
 
 
Have you been able to buy one?

  

Re: [Vo]:Acoustic demonstration of beats

2020-10-12 Thread Jones Beene
 

The appearance of higher amplitude sound waves could seem, at first, like a 
path to net gain.
Dicke "superradiance is involved as well as Fermi-Pasta-Ulam

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermi%E2%80%93Pasta%E2%80%93Ulam%E2%80%93Tsingou_problem

H LV wrote:  
 
Acoustic demonstration of beats
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYeV2Wq82fw

This is not mentioned in the video but beats also arise and persist in a driven 
oscillator when no damping force is present. This happens because the driver`s 
frequency does not match the natural frequency of the oscillator. Beats will 
also initially appear in a driven oscillator when a damping force is present 
but they will fade away quickly.
Harry


  

Re: [Vo]:Interstellar travel

2020-10-08 Thread Jones Beene
 Looks like your angle is radiative cooling. 

Plus, speaking of angles - the full kinetic energy of the particles would not 
be transferred to the titanium.

H LV wrote:  
 
 The ship would need some way to stay to cool. Harry
Robin wrote:


According to wiki (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstellar_medium) the 
density of matter in between stars in the
galaxy is about 1E6 molecules / cm^3. We make the assumption that all of it is 
molecular Hydrogen.

A space ship traveling at half the speed of light would encounter these 
molecules traveling in the opposite direction at
that velocity. Assuming that the kinetic energy of these particles is 
calculated using 1/2 m*v^2 (it's actually more at
that speed), then the power associated with the impact on the hull of the ship 
is about 1/2 MW /cm^2.
If we further assume that the hull is made of 1/2 cm thick Titanium, then it 
will reach it's melting point after an
exposure of 4 milliseconds.

It's going to be very short trip. ;)


  

Re: [Vo]:FTL Communications

2020-10-04 Thread Jones Beene
 Negative mass may actually be allowed by Einstein's theory of relativity. At 
least that is what a few proponents claim. Particles with negative mass are 
tachyons - which supposedly always travel faster than light. That does not mean 
they can carry positive information, but who knows - this topic is closer to 
SciFi than real Sci.

What is negative information? Interesting semantics - is factual information 
which is traveling at FTL best described negative info? which brings up the 
concept of "alternative facts" ... Maybe Kellyanne will be cured by same ...?


Terry Blanton wrote:  
 
 If information has mass, how can it travel FTL?
https://www.discovermagazine.com/technology/the-quantum-internet-will-blow-your-mind-heres-what-it-will-look-like
  

Re: [Vo]:Propellantless EM drive results

2020-09-24 Thread Jones Beene
Terry Blanton wrote: 
 > I would be interested on more on the claim he made about increased heat in 
 > computer systems when information is deleted.  He acted like that was a 
 > proven fact.  Anyone got a citation on such?

I think this comes from Landauer's principle but I do not have a citation 
handy. I will look for it tomorrow.
  

Re: [Vo]:Propellantless EM drive results

2020-09-24 Thread Jones Beene
 For anyone who loves science, the new McCulloch lecture on YT is one of the 
great unappreciated finds of all time !
Yes, it is long and yes he is not a great presenter ... BUT ... the content 
here is astounding. And it is fairly terse, given the breadth of the subject 
matter. McCulloch was brought up on Vortex by Mark Iverson over 4 years ago and 
again by Alain Sepeda and Jack Cole but it is just now sinking in to the 
collective conscious of vorticians thanks to this new video. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=341Yk4k51uY=youtu.be
Only a thousand views. Pity. You will thank yourself if you make it through to 
the end.

With a few tweaks, this Quantum Inertia theory is almost guaranteed to get 
traction. It has so much to offer.


Sean Logan wrote:  
 This is great!






 

  

Re: [Vo]:The so-called "secret new weapon"

2020-09-15 Thread Jones Beene
Think about the implications of dense hydrogen in the role of binding and 
reacting with another (larger) nucleus as if were two neutrons. This is 
completely new physics.

Such a discovery would open an entirely new world of overlooked nuclear 
reactions which were never given much hope before. It could make nuclear 
fission the top energy source once again, in the grand scheme of things and rid 
us of the false expectation that nuclear fusion has a real future. It is simply 
too expensive. 

However we cannot gauge probabilities yet, and all of this is speculative. It 
would be essential to know the cross-section of various element (for absorption 
of H*-H*)  so as to determine the commercially valuable products and isotopes. 
It might be possible to get more in value from new isotopes than from the 
excess heat of hydrogen densification... or it all could be used together so 
that fission energy becomes far more attractive than before.

Here is one kind of potential reaction that you may not have thought about. 
Thorium based.
If the H*-H* acts like two neutrons with thorium as a target, one might expect 
to convert 232Th into 234Th which has a short half-life and goes to 234Pa and 
then to 234U. Now 234U is interesting in a surprising way if it can be made 
cheaply, even though it is NOT fissile. Well, technically. it is not fissile - 
but it can be viewed as virtually fissile.

The hidden value of 234U would be because it has a long half life plus a known 
and very large cross section for neutrons. Thus in a reactor it would almost 
immediately become 235 U which is probably the best of all uranium isotopes. 
Thus a breeder reactor becomes very feasible possibly with natural U.

In short although this is a naive possibility given that we have so little data 
to look at - the H*-H* having similar reactivity to 2n - that would be 
extremely important in framing a revival of fission, and who knows what else?



Re: [Vo]:The so-called "secret new weapon"

2020-09-15 Thread Jones Beene
 Well, you could be getting inferior advice. It makes little sense to worry 
about IH or anyone else when a trip to Stockholm (for the big prize) is waiting 
for positive results showing  H*-H* absorption... No one is going to get rich 
on this anyway, other than patent attorneys and Wall Street. There is too much 
IP already issued to waste time with more.

Rgds,
Jones


    Jürg Wyttenbach wrote:  
  
We do currently not publish the spectra as there are to many patent trolls like 
IH just waiting for it...
 
But I have tons of files with interesting details. Anybody serious that is 
willing to support us either by labor or some significant financial support 
will get access to our knowledge.
 
Further I consult other experimenters on how to enhance their reactions. 
 
 

 
 
J.W.
 
 

 
 Jones Beene wrote:
  
 
  Jürg Wyttenbach wrote: 
  > What we see in experiments is that H*-H* reacts like two neutrons. This in 
respect to the intermediate products we see.  
  
  Are any of these experiments published ? 
  
  Absorption of 2 neutrons when proved would be absolutely huge in importance, 
since AFAIK this does not happen in standard physics. For one thing, two normal 
neutrons never bond.
  
  
+41 79 246 36 06   

Re: [Vo]:The so-called "secret new weapon"

2020-09-15 Thread Jones Beene
 Jürg Wyttenbach wrote:  
 > What we see in experiments is that H*-H* reacts like two neutrons. This in 
 > respect to the intermediate products we see. 

Are any of these experiments published ? 

Absorption of 2 neutrons when proved would be absolutely huge in importance, 
since AFAIK this does not happen in standard physics. For one thing, two normal 
neutrons never bond.


  

Re: [Vo]:Heat from under our feet?

2020-09-12 Thread Jones Beene
Terry Blanton wrote: 
Frank Znidarsic wrote: Even Jane Fonda wrote a book on climate change. 
> Still looks good at 82; although, the makeup artist for G did win an 
> award...
More to the point ... the China Syndrome is still a persistent meme. Some may 
remember the old bumper sticker, seen on many a vehicle around ORNL in the 
seventies...

https://imged.com/what-spreads-faster-than-radiation-jane-fonda-vintage-bumper-sticker-vietnam-54956947.html


  

[Vo]:The so-called "secret new weapon"

2020-09-12 Thread Jones Beene
For those who have not connected the dots (in the last few days) and have too 
much time on their hands, the silly season of election year politics is now 
focusing on a "secret" new weapon. 

Not sure if any pundit has mentioned that over two years ago Lewis Larsen et al 
was suggesting exactly the same secret new "cold fusion" augmented weapon, 
which had been developed in a black project by the Pentagon and was copied by 
Russia. Not many took Larsen seriously. Here is some background.

https://www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/lattice-energy-llc-russia-announces-nuclear-fissionpowered-cruise-missile-perhaps-lenr-powered-in-future-march-3-2018
Lewis Larsen died on October 25, 2019 at the age of 72. 

Along with Allan Widom, Larsen developed the theory of "ultra low momentum" 
neutrons, which is similar and possibly superior to the better know theories of 
Randell Mills and Leif Holmlid and others. There is plenty of indication that 
his "virtual neutron" is approximately the same species as ultra-dense hydrogen 
etc.
Put on your tin hats. 

This is ripe fruit for the growing number of conspiracy theorists on social 
media. The story may not rise to become an "October surprise" - especially once 
it is learned that it is not exactly new and not exactly secret, but 
nevertheless... Lewis Larsen must be smiling from the other side.















Re: [Vo]:Unexplained Magnetic Phenomenon EXPLAINED

2020-09-04 Thread Jones Beene
 One thought that comes up in designing a transportation device is combining 
the Hamdi effect with "printed" magnets. Not sure if this was mentioned in the 
earlier thread.
There are several companies doing the printed field scheme and there could be 
synergy with spinning a specially designed pattern.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/a20023/printed-magnets-polymagnets-smarter-every-day/
Who knows?

Jones

Terry Blanton wrote:
 
 > One of the things previously discussed is possible applications for
such a phenomenon.  Other than a toy similar to Levitron, none of us
have been creative enough to come up with anything...Personally, I 
have wondered if the suspended magnet could be easily
"handed off" to another, adjacent magnet; thus, setting up the
possibility of a new type of maglev transportation device.


  

Re: [Vo]:The temperature of the CMB

2020-08-28 Thread Jones Beene
 Harry,
Are you familiar with the "big bounce" arguments?
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200117-what-if-the-universe-has-no-end
This emerging hypothesis seems to address some of the problems with Hoyle, Gold 
etc. which seem to falter due to CMB uniformity - and possibly represents the 
best new alternative to the standard cosmological model. 

In the end, with new findings the uniformity of the CMB is in doubt and the 
current model is probably not as accurate as most would think.

Jones

H LV wrote:  
 The Riddle of the Redshift: The Universe We Don't Understand .A talk given by 
Margaret Burbidge in 2001 ( She worked with Fred Hoyle)
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eYbpykJVD8

Harry

On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 4:32 PM H LV  wrote:



https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/cross-check/remembering-big-bang-basher-fred-hoyle/
  
quote
<> 

As we all know a CMB was found in 1965 but I was not aware that the early Big 
Bang theorists predicted a higher temperature for the CMB. I wonder how this 
discrepancy was explained by the BB theorists. 

Harry
  

Re: [Vo]:Resonator shaped like a hyperbolic vortex

2020-08-24 Thread Jones Beene
 Terry Blanton wrote: 
> The rumors I heard was that it was testing remotely powered drones using 
> microwave transmitters and rectennas on the drone to attempt to keep them 
> aloft indefinitely.
Wonder if they were kept any drones aloft for the whole time? 

Say, having enough microwave energy to power a drone might mean that they could 
also test a hybrid resonant cavity so both things could be going on. I suppose 
that it would be possible to design an EM-type drive, especially if one can be 
made of superconductor, where some of the RF energy bouncing around in the 
cavity is allowed to bleed out in a single vector, and thereby act as a photon 
rocket engine in addition to whatever else is going on. 




  

Re: [Vo]:Resonator shaped like a hyperbolic vortex

2020-08-24 Thread Jones Beene
 Speaking of resonant cavity devices, state secrets and the EM Drive 
specifically, there is this:
https://www.universetoday.com/143870/x-37b-lands-after-780-days-in-orbit-doing/
It is strongly suggested that a prototype EM Drive was aboard. No comment from 
officials.

Despite the fact that most scientists still do not think it is feasible, the 
silence from NASA about the testing in space - is palpable.
Let me say again that Logan's geometry would stand a good chance of being 
superior, if the concept does work, since the area ratio of the surface area of 
the ends is far greater and that ratio seems to be an important criteria. 
Instead of say 3:1 it could be 100:1 or more. Using that increased area are 
might entail providing several different RF frequencies instead of one.

Jones


  

Re: [Vo]:Resonator shaped like a hyperbolic vortex

2020-08-24 Thread Jones Beene
 The Wiki listing for "resonant cavity thruster" is a place to start as there 
are good links to more detail

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RF_resonant_cavity_thruster
There is a long thread on Reddit if you have a few days to waste
Sean Logan wrote

> Can you refer me to some good papers on the Shawyer truncated cone?

  

Re: [Vo]:The Oumuamua anomaly

2020-08-23 Thread Jones Beene
H LV wrote: 
 > Since hardly anything is known about the composition and structure of 
 > Oumuamua one is free to imagine a composition and structure that could 
 > produce the observed trajectory when interacting the sun's magnetic field. 

If it has the right composition, it is probably cold enough, when away from the 
sun to be a high temperature superconductor, right? 

Thus it would expel the magnetic field and accelerate away from  say - Jupiter, 
which has by far the strongest magnetic field in the solar system 

Here is an article on SC material found in meteorites

Superconducting materials found in meteorites 

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[Vo]:Covid antibody treatment breakthrough ?

2020-08-23 Thread Jones Beene
Hopeful news ...

Later on today, the President is scheduled to announce a major announcement on 
a breakthrough in Covid therapy. Unlike other recent antibody research - this 
one promises to be far more effective. 

There is a lot of speculation about what this treatment consists of, other than 
it is based on human donor blood antibodies (which approach has not yet lived 
up to expectations) but the Admin is being tight-lipped about the details, 
possibly to maximize the Political impact of such an positive announcement 
(following the once touted quinine disappointment). It would be a boost if true.

Here is the candidate treatment which started with an extraordinary incident, a 
tragedy involving a high rate of infection aboard a fishing vessel in 
Washington State. A couple of the crew however, fortuitously had unusually 
strong antibodies - which on testing have reportedly given the best results of 
any treatment so far. 

The pre-print is here (not yet peer reviewed). The proponents are very 
optimistic which does not show up in the paper.

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.13.20173161v1.full.pdf
The News story behind it is here.

https://www.livescience.com/antibodies-prevent-covid-19-reinfection-fishing-boat.html
I hope this is a true breakthrough and not another false alarm.




[Vo]:Muon catalyzed fusion - the lasting legacy of LENR ?

2020-08-22 Thread Jones Beene
The Wiki entry for muon catalyzed fusion has been updated to include the new 
advancement of Norront Fusion of Norway, using the techniques of Dr Leif 
Holmlid of Sweden to produce muons easily and cheaply without the requirement 
of a beam line.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muon-catalyzed_fusion
Even though almost no one (that is, no one who needs to raise VC funding) wants 
to be identified with "cold fusion" these days - clearly what we have in the 
Norront system should be identified as a version of LENR. 

Thirty+ years ago, P specifically rejected the notion that muons were 
involved in their technique, and perhaps they were correct on that - but they 
did not know of the big advance of Holmlid which suggests that it is far easier 
to produce muons than anyone ever expected. 

Had the "Letts/Cravens effect" gotten more traction, it clearly bridges the gap 
between what Norront is doing and what P were doing. I wonder if anyone is 
still pursuing the Letts/Cravens technique? At one time, it was rumored that 
Industrial Heat (Dewey Weaver) was providing some funds for this work - but 
with no hint of success. Norront, on the other hand, is on the verge of 
producing a commercial unit which ironically looks like Rossi's shipping 
container fusion source. 

Too bad IH did not get any return for all the risks they took, but who knows - 
maybe they have invested in Norront as well.
Jones








Re: [Vo]:The Oumuamua anomaly

2020-08-21 Thread Jones Beene
 

Vibrator ! wrote:  
 > Probably been mooted before; but could the anomalous acceleration be due to 
 > outgassing of hydrinos?
Was there ever any evidence of hydrino at all? e.g. Hydrogen Balmer Line 
broadening or EUV emission etc

An amateur should have been able to document such an emission anomaly, if it 
were a feature of that object.




  

Re: [Vo]:New book from Steve Krivit

2020-08-19 Thread Jones Beene
 I started reading it. Despite the earlier version, this is very well written 
and documented - and worth anyone's 4 bucks. I like the large font for easier 
reading so Kindle is the way to go.

As Nick sez there is important older historical stuff that may have been 
vaguely known to specialists, but not appreciated.

Actually the more I read it the more I like it.

Well done, Steve... 

...even if belated 

... definitely a time warp.


   Jed Rothwell wrote: 
 
 It was new to me! Amazon.com did not bring it to my attention previously.
Maybe the Kindle version is new?
- Jed
  

Re: [Vo]:New book from Steve Krivit

2020-08-19 Thread Jones Beene
 Terry Blanton wrote:  
 > If it's a new book, why are the reviews dated 2017?  And "John 
 > Smith"...siriusly?
Hmmm let;s see

1) LENR warps time2) Pocahontas was also a big LENR fan


  

Re: [Vo]:Re: Lattice Confinement Fusion

2020-08-19 Thread Jones Beene
 Is the correct Rydberg value 27.2 instead of 22.7 ?
...or was that a typo ?



Robin wrote:  

>The elements is rare, costly and does not appear in the list of Mills’ 
>catalysts (but almost any element can be contorted to be catalytic,, as Mills 
>has repeatedly shown).

The 3rd ionization energy of Er is 22.739 eV. Close enough to 22.7 that thermal 
kinetic energy can make up the
difference.
  

Re: [Vo]:New book from Steve Krivit

2020-08-19 Thread Jones Beene
 Jed Rothwell wrote:  
 See: Fusion Fiasco, by Steve Krivit
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N2TDWIY

"draw on formerly inaccessible archives" 



Anyone know the details about these "archives" ?  

Sounds like reason enough to order the Kindle version, which I did but cannot 
get to it for a few hours.

  

Re: [Vo]:Algae isotopic change

2020-08-07 Thread Jones Beene
 lithium isotope ratios are altered by some organisms -




Alexander Hollins  wrote:  
 
 Hey all, i recall previous discussions about isotopic changes in , i wanna say 
nickel, found in mats of certain types of algae, but search is failing me. does 
anyone recall this and or have links?  

Re: [Vo]:Spacecraft of the Future Could Be Powered By Lattice Confinement Fusion

2020-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
Jack Cole wrote:  
 It is also hard to not see some parallels with our last experiments (2016) 
with TiH2, nickel sheets, and light. 

Jack
Do you have an online citation for this work?
  

Re: [Vo]:Spacecraft of the Future Could Be Powered By Lattice Confinement Fusion

2020-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
 bobcook39...@hotmail.com wrote:  
 The reason why there is no gamma stems from the transfer of spin energy in 
small quanta of angular momentum—nuclear to electric—with the same entangled 
system—the crystalline lattice of the host material.  The time frame may be 
very short—less than a femto- second.  
Bob
OK. How is that explanation different from Hagelstein? 



 
  
 
  
   

Re: [Vo]:Spacecraft of the Future Could Be Powered By Lattice Confinement Fusion

2020-08-06 Thread Jones Beene
H LV wrote:  
> Remember 10-12 years ago the buzz around x-rays from peeling 
> tape?https://youtu.be/r63e5y3Z3R8
> If this way of generating x-rays could be harnessed it would make this 
> lattice confinement fusion more economical.

That is a QM effect which does not scale up. The same could be said for much of 
LENR. In addition, it would seem that the Lawson criterion of hot plasma fusion 
would also apply, in a modified (reworded) way to the new and improved 
semantics for lattice enhanced but no longer "cold" fusion. i.e. when we 
observe effective temperature and pressure on the femtoscale. 

As for input - an external electron beam of hot fusion could be modeled as 
internal k-shell or l-shell resonant electron. Here is the Wiki site for Lawson.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawson_criterion
IOW - one needs only to reduce the geometry of the active site to its actual 
minimal dimension to see the similarity to plasma fusion, except for one big 
distinction.. The lack of gamma radiation remains the main difference between 
hot and (formerly) cold -- and this is where the lattice itself comes into play.

We have to assume that Hagelstein got that part right, or close - and that the 
lattice carries away most of the downshifted excess instead of gamma radiation. 
With that addition, the old "cold fusion" becomes the new QM-lattice-fusion. 

It never was cold, was it?

  

Re: [Vo]:Spacecraft of the Future Could Be Powered By Lattice Confinement Fusion

2020-08-05 Thread Jones Beene
 Ha! The new and improved new wording is interesting in a semantic sense... but 
get real...

Of course it is the demon cold fusion, but now we can pivot around that stigma 
and instead present it all in on a different geometry... very little changes 
but the word salad.

IOW it is the same old cold fusion (of P/F) that we know and lover ... no 
substantial difference at all... but now we differentiate so that it is very 
hot at the femtoscale and warm everywhere else... exactly like it has been for 
the past 31 years when the perspective is the much larger dimensional frame of 
reference.

I think Larry Forsley must be getting a big laugh out of this  :-)



On Wednesday, August 5, 2020, 7:31:16 PM PDT, Jack Cole  
wrote:  
 
 They are careful to say it's not CF.  Sure seems like it originated in CF 
methods.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/nuclear/nuclear-fusiontokamak-not-included
  

Re: [Vo]:[EE] Wireless power transmission

2020-08-05 Thread Jones Beene
 I read it but it seemed flakey. 

This could be closer to scam than to reality. No one really knows the loss-rate 
of wireless for high power uses or the dangers involved. 

There is not much reason to suspect that there is a breakthrough here nor that 
this makes either scientific or economic sense, other than the mention of 
Tesla, but since they apparently are not using Tesla as a reference - where is 
their data?


On Wednesday, August 5, 2020, 11:13:24 AM PDT, Michael Foster 
 wrote:  
 
 I read this article. Don't you find it more than a little annoying that Mr. 
Tesla is nowhere mentioned? 

This is important. No doubt everyone other than auto mechanics and people who 
like the hear the vroom-vroom would like to switch to electric cars. The 
problem is there doesn't seem to be enough copper wire to carry all the current 
required to charge all the batteries in all the electric cars.  Last time I did 
some rough figuring, it seemed as if the maximum number of electric cars would 
be about 10% of all vehicles before the power grid was over taxed.  Look at 
what happens when there are brown-outs on hot days. Those air conditioners 
don't draw anywhere near the current required to charge a 100% electric car 
fleet.

Wireless power transmission, if really workable, would solve this problem. 
Autos themselves could be set up to receive the power transmission, thereby 
eliminating the requirement for such large batteries.








 On Wednesday, August 5, 2020, 02:50:34 AM UTC, MJ  wrote:






https://emrod.energy/press-release-nz-start-up-launches-world-first-long-range-wireless-power-transmission/

  

Re: [Vo]:Antivirus Wetware

2020-07-31 Thread Jones Beene
 New strain is now showing up which is several times more transmissible than 
the original version.
https://www.sfchronicle.com/health/article/A-new-strain-of-the-coronavirus-is-dominant-now-15447508.php
The implications of the new dynamic in rapid spreading are seriously 
threatening even with quarantines, so lets hope it is less deadly. 

Perhaps the new strain will be mild - yet almost everyone will get it -- and 
then be inoculated against the deadly version, "for free" as it were. 

That would be bad for Big Pharma... but they seem to find a way to monetize any 
threat.


  Terry Blanton  wrote:

If we were as vulnerable to virus as many believe, humanity would not have 
survived as long as we have.  Other than antibodies, we have developed other 
defenses over the eons.  This article:
https://www.bath.ac.uk/announcements/we-are-mutating-sars-cov-2-but-it-is-evolving-back/
 
describes how humans weaken a virus over time.  Indeed, along with good 
quarentining (preventing the survival of more fit mutations), the SARS virus 
was taken down in this manner.  Antibody stimulating vaccines are good; but, 
attacking that one thing which makes the virus our enemy, its RNA, is better. 

  

Re: [Vo]:ThomasGas - is it just another alternative energy scam ?

2020-07-28 Thread Jones Beene
 Michael Foster wrote: 
 > Am I the only one on this list to make a limelight? It's pretty easy. Apply 
 > an oxyhydrogen torch to a piece of marble, limestone or sea shell and the 
 > calcium carbonate is converted to calcium oxide on the spot. The resulting 
 > brilliant white light is a really beautiful form of illumination. Too bad 
 > it's impractical for everyday use.

Maybe not impracticable, Michael, especially given the simplicity. Perhaps a 
"use" or many uses would materialize if indeed there was found to be an excess 
photon flux anomaly.

The bright output of such a light source should be tested using a simple 
specialty meter against a known incandescent source,for instance. Simply by 
using a lumen or light meter (less than $100) which are accurate and not 
complicated by environmental conditions, we would bypass the mystique of proper 
flow calorimetry.

Excess photon emission essentially means that the photon flux times the energy 
per photon would exceed unity which would be the chemical energy of the 
hydrogen burning in O2. This would seem to be a feasible way to show net energy 
gain from limelight - and assuming calcium is a catalyst for formation of dense 
hydrogen, it could be the easiest way... plus maybe the most convincing... when 
the goal is to show this kind of anomaly.

  

Re: [Vo]:ThomasGas - is it just another alternative energy scam ?

2020-07-25 Thread Jones Beene
Nigel Dyer wrote:
 
 > This has much the same feel as Brown's gas, including similar supposed 
 > health benefits that others have claimed for Browns gas.
Another option is Santilli's "magnegas" but it contains a significant amount of 
carbon monoxide. Yet there is a point to be made that there must be some 
anomaly in all this noise, even if it is also true that PT Barnum was right. 
One can actually purchase magnegas for welding at many welding shops - but 
there is no study that indicates a strong thermal anomaly.

Wiki has its entry under "Oxyhydrogen" but the explosive mixture has also been 
called HHO,"knallgas," town gas, "common manifold electrolysis" and more. Maybe 
Thomas Gas is the breakthrough which will open the subject up again. It is a 
bit glib to lump it all as fringe science since there could be the same kernel 
of truth as in LENR - which generally leads us back to "dense hydrogen" being 
involved. 

The original phenomenon - limelight - is 140 years old.Wow. Now we find that 
Holmlid has given us an alternative explanation for what is going on... hmm ... 
one wonders about those old vaudevillians getting irradiated with muons. 

My guess is that Gracie was right (back in the day)... "Never place a period 
where God has placed a comma" - Gracie Allen.
IOW - do not write off the possibility of any of these hydrogen anomalies just 
yet - there is still a comma there.


 > This turned up today - a "new" hydrogen based fuel... shades of Brown's Gas ?
  
  https://thomasinstitute.weebly.com/ 
 

 

Re: [Vo]:ThomasGas - is it just another alternative energy scam ?

2020-07-22 Thread Jones Beene
 Robin wrote: 
One typical sign of BS is that they can't distinguish between L & kg. Quote:-

"Seconds or 400 liters per hour ( 9,600 kgs in 24 hours) at 20 psi."
also, good luck trying to compress positively charged ions. :)

Well, we could cut them some slack by assuming that the density is one kg/L. A 
most interestingpossibility, for those who believe in Randell Mills concept of 
hydrino hydride would be this:
Given that hydrino hydride is an anion, according to Mills, then that species 
could balance the 
charge of the hydronium cation. That way, a 1/1 mix should be neutral in 
charge. 

There would still be a problem of phase separation  - gas phase and liquid 
phase but perhapsthis mix could be frozen or otherwise absorbed.
Ice-nine comes to mind   
Signed
Felix Hoenikker

  

Re: [Vo]:ThomasGas - is it just another alternative energy scam ?

2020-07-22 Thread Jones Beene
 Terry Blanton wrote: 
 
 > Did you check out the article they referenced:
https://phys.org/news/2020-07-liquid-hydrogen-oxygen-molecules.html 
> Considering the energy densities envolved, it looks more like HP than dense 
> H2. 


Yes, that reference is interesting in a general way, but in terms of specific 
implementation as an affordable fuel - the only real choice would seem to be 
hydronium (as a cation). It is a natural component of water. Catch 22. The 
hydronium cation is not stable and quickly neutralizes, BUT maybe they have 
found a way to stabilize it? 

Here is an paper on hydronium metastability.
"Metastable hydronium ions in UV-irradiated ice"

https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.4768418

Curiously, since the topic of electrets came up, that could possibly be another 
way.

Given that Thomas is not pleading for investment, it could be that he is being 
somewhat less than open in the details, but why publish anything at all? 

Maybe he is looking for the rare investor who is actively looking for such a 
solution and can fill in the blanks.




  

[Vo]:ThomasGas - is it just another alternative energy scam ?

2020-07-22 Thread Jones Beene
This turned up today - a "new" hydrogen based fuel... shades of Brown's Gas ?

https://thomasinstitute.weebly.com/
Thomas Gas has all the hallmarks of the typical alternative energy scam, 
including no independent verification, no useful data, no peer reviewed paper 
and absurd health claims. But unlike most of these scams - is alluring in that 
they claim to have a long running working device. Also - a few other details do 
check out, so at least it is an above-average scam.

Plus - if there is anything to it at all - the description makes it sound like 
it could involve dense hydrogen in some way, but that too is not clear. Any new 
tech with overtones of dense hydrogen gets my interest.

Quote: "The prototype of the Thomas Gas Generator is now working for over 5 
years."
Whoa. That should be easy enough to document, yet there is no indication from a 
reputable source that it is true and no images of the device. They have a 
Facebook page, but I am anti-FB so that is no help.

​They continue: "Thomas Gas (TG) is a hydrogen derivative that is 100 % green, 
clean, environmentally safe, and has higher energy potential than typical 
hydrogen gas...TG has a net charge of +1, non-combustible, superconductor 
versus Hydrogen with 0 net charge, highly combustible, and high conductivity. 

The British thermal unit (BTU) is a measure of energy production.  Molecular 
hydrogen (H2) carries 2.7X higher energy per unit mass than gasoline (1 kg of 
H2 has approximately the energy content of one gallon (2.7 kg) of gasoline).

Energy Generated by Combustion of Fuels and Hydrogen
              Fuels                                BTU/lb.
Gasoline (n-Heptane)                     19,314
Natural gas                                      20,267
Conventional gasoline                     18,679  
U.S. conventional diesel                  18,397
Crude oil                                           18,352
Hydrogen (H2)                                  52,200
Thomas Gas (TG)                           196,200

As depicted, the energy contained in 1 pound of TG is 10.5 X greater than 
conventional gasoline and3.75X greater than H2.
Is this complete BS?
My guess is that the odds of it being real are slim, but there is possibly 
something there and I am willing to waste a few hours of Covid time, trying to 
find out.



Re: [Vo]:what do you think of Goodenouh's self charging batterY?

2020-07-20 Thread Jones Beene
Ron Kita wrote:
> Electrets my specialty. 

Hey Ron, 

Let me throw this idea out for you. Have you considered the implications of 
dense hydrogen as it might apply to being integrated into the structure of an 
electret ? 

IOW - if and when someone invents the process to make dense hydrogen very 
cheaply (and why not?) then imagine this species being impregnated into say a 
polymer film in such a way that many of the electrons presented in a far more 
compact state than normal and yet stable,,, such a material would most likely 
make a very special electret. This assumes (using theory via either Mills or 
Holmlid et al) the charge properties of the dense state are modified or 
enhanced by inverse square and so on 

- well, such am electret film should have amazing electrical and magnetic 
properties. This idea may have been tossed around before ...?





Re: [Vo]: CoV-19 news

2020-07-01 Thread Jones Beene
 In Lodi, they recommend 200 mg pycnogenol washed down with a glass of good Zin 
... 6 times per day
This may not offer a complete cure but who cares? it will definitely mitigate 
many of the symptoms ;-)

Terry Blanton wrote:  
 > Here is a good Italian survey of in vitro results which offer a promising 
 > category of nutritional options (polyphenols) ...
An apple a daywith covfefe. 
>From wikipedia:
Many foods in a healthy diet contain high levels of naturally occurring phenols 
in fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea and coffee. Fruits like grapes, apple, 
pear, cherries and berries contain up to 200–300 mg polyphenols per 100 grams 
fresh weight. The products manufactured from these fruits also contain 
polyphenols in significant amounts. Typically a glass of red wine or a cup of 
tea or coffee contains about 100 mg polyphenols.[4]  

   

[Vo]:The recent Sci-News accounts simply dense hydrogen ?

2020-06-21 Thread Jones Beene
https://www.universetoday.com/146615/japanese-dark-matter-detector-is-seeing-a-surprising-excess-of-events/
There are a number of news stories like this coming in the last week. Everyone 
seems to copying everyone else in the reports... blind leading the blind, as 
they say.

If you read this in the context of old postings here - there is a bit of 
synchronicity. This relates to a strong intergalactic signal showing up at 
around 3.5 keV. Out of sight, out of mind.
The present researchers also suggest "tritium contamination" which rises almost 
to the level of stupidity given the circumstances.

Years ago, hundreds of postings here on vortex tried to make some sense out of 
the news of x-ray spectra and dark matter from dozens of efforts. Our slant was 
towards dense hydrogen being the culprit. Anyway, in the world of astrophysics, 
there has been  recognized to be a soft x-ray signal associated with emissions 
from the center of hundreds of galaxies, showing up at around 3.5-3.6 keV and 
no obvious origin. Dark matter was one possibility, also neutrinos. The LENR 
crowd has suggested an alternative in dense hydrogen.

Curiously with the new work using underground detectors instead of satellites, 
and pure xenon, the old  coincidental similarity in mass-energy, is hardly 
mentioned. Maybe I missed it or maybe it takes a while to sink in. The fit to 
the new data is not exact, but close.

Specialization is killing science in some ways. If you were looking for an 
imaginary particle - an axion, then apparently the similarity with anything 
else from the past is overlooked. Tritium decay is a ridiculous afterthought.

Go figure.


RE: [Vo]:another missguided energy project

2020-06-20 Thread Jones Beene
Frank
Your project reminds me of a video where a single guy with primitve tools does 
some serious landscaping and gets a nice pool out of the effort.

...dig it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NT0EmAgP-_k




Re: [Vo]:"Burning"hydrogen with argon ?

2020-06-18 Thread Jones Beene
Speaking of the bad apples at ITER and their apologists   Shame on 
Mitsubishi...
http://news.newenergytimes.net/2020/06/17/paid-article-by-mitsubishi-in-forbes-falsifies-iter-design-objectives/

Re: [Vo]:"Burning"hydrogen with argon ?

2020-06-17 Thread Jones Beene
 ITER is indeed a sad joke and a dirty stain on the physics establishment.
Wouldn't it be ironic if that project was magically savaged and made 
commercially useful - by the simple expedient of adding on a cheap muon source 
... which of course is where the Holmlid licensees are envissioning an 
opportunity? Muon catalyzed fusion could push that project from slightly above 
breakeven to massively energetic.

This scenario is not a fantasy dream. 

Matter of fact, it would be a surprise to me if something like this outcome 
does not happen in maybe a year or so. 


Michael Foster wrote:  
 I believe we are engaged in a nostalgic postmortem. No?  CF/LENR has been 
systematically beaten to death by members of the scientific establishment 
afraid of losing their grants, especially the ITER nuts with the huge budgets. 





  

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