Re: [Wikimedia-l] internet-in-a-boxs to the refugee camps?

2015-09-09 Thread Neil P. Quinn
This reminds me of several conversations I had with Barbara Schack of
Libraries Without Borders [1] at the Lyon hackathon (I've copied her on
this email).

They've developed the Ideas Box [2], a portable media center intended for
locations like refugee camps. It's similar to the Internet-in-a-Box,
although it takes the concept further by including client devices, toys,
and furniture as well as an offline content server (it's really quite
cool). As you'd imagine, the Ideas Box includes read access to downloaded
Wikipedia content; however, Barbara told me she wanted Ideas Box users to
have the opportunity to contribute as well as simply read, and asked us
what it would take to make that possible.

We talked about it a good deal and had a brainstorming workshop on the
subject; I recorded many of the ideas in Phabricator [3]. The technical
challenges are significant, so I don't think anybody has pursued the
project since then. However, if anyone out there wants to work on bridging
this aspect of the digital divide, I'm sure Barbara would be excited to
work with you!

[1]: http://www.librarieswithoutborders.org/
[2]: http://www.ideas-box.org/en/
[3]: https://phabricator.wikimedia.org/T100154

On Mon, Sep 7, 2015 at 3:36 PM, Comet styles  wrote

> contrary to the name, it doesn't actually have 'internet access'
> ..they can read, but not contribute..
>
> On 9/8/15, Jane Darnell  wrote:
> > Good idea. I watched a report on TV where they said some refugees have
> been
> > waiting for years for processing. It would be nice for them to be able to
> > use and maybe contribute to Wikipedia while they are waiting. Maybe we
> > should set up edit-a-thons and wikiclasses about life in Europe and the
> > politics of the crisis, for the refugees and the Europeans both!
> >
> > On Mon, Sep 7, 2015 at 9:45 PM, Leinonen Teemu 
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Hello people,
> >>
> >> Just an idea. Number of Syrian refugees is over 4,000,000 people, mostly
> >> residing in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq.[1] Refugee camps are set
> in
> >> all in these countries.[2]
> >>
> >> Internet-in-a-Box[3] is a a WiFI-device with "Wikipedia in 37
> languages, a
> >> library of 40,000 e-books, most of the world's open source software and
> >> source code, hundreds of hours of instructional videos, and world-wide
> >> mapping down to street level.”
> >>
> >> Could we as a movement get the internet-in-a-box to the refugee camps?
> >>
> >> - Teemu
> >>
> >> [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refugees_of_the_Syrian_Civil_War
> >> [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_refugee_camps
> >> [3] http://internet-in-a-box.org
> >>
> >> --
> >> Teemu Leinonen
> >> http://teemuleinonen.fi
> >> ___
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>
>
> --
> Cometstyles
>
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-- 
Neil P. Quinn ,
product analyst
Wikimedia Foundation
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] internet-in-a-boxs to the refugee camps?

2015-09-09 Thread Steven Walling
Offline access is a nice idea, but the logistics of delivery seem daunting.
Thankfully, a large number of refugees and migrants have smartphones.[1]

Probably the biggest ways we could help refugees are really to:

A) make Wikipedia super performant on mobile, particularly for low-end
Android devices

B) make Wikipedia free via mobile programs like Zero or SMS gateways, so
people who can't pay for data can access it

C) get more relevant, updated content in Arabic. Articles on relevant
subjects are much shorter than in English, etc.[2]

1.
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/08/26/world/europe/a-21st-century-migrants-checklist-water-shelter-smartphone.html
2.
https://ar.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D8%A3%D8%B2%D9%85%D8%A9_%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%87%D8%A7%D8%AC%D8%B1%D9%8A%D9%86_%D8%A5%D9%84%D9%89_%D8%A3%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%88%D8%A8%D8%A7

On Tue, Sep 8, 2015 at 11:00 PM Neil P. Quinn  wrote:

> This reminds me of several conversations I had with Barbara Schack of
> Libraries Without Borders [1] at the Lyon hackathon (I've copied her on
> this email).
>
> They've developed the Ideas Box [2], a portable media center intended for
> locations like refugee camps. It's similar to the Internet-in-a-Box,
> although it takes the concept further by including client devices, toys,
> and furniture as well as an offline content server (it's really quite
> cool). As you'd imagine, the Ideas Box includes read access to downloaded
> Wikipedia content; however, Barbara told me she wanted Ideas Box users to
> have the opportunity to contribute as well as simply read, and asked us
> what it would take to make that possible.
>
> We talked about it a good deal and had a brainstorming workshop on the
> subject; I recorded many of the ideas in Phabricator [3]. The technical
> challenges are significant, so I don't think anybody has pursued the
> project since then. However, if anyone out there wants to work on bridging
> this aspect of the digital divide, I'm sure Barbara would be excited to
> work with you!
>
> [1]: http://www.librarieswithoutborders.org/
> [2]: http://www.ideas-box.org/en/
> [3]: https://phabricator.wikimedia.org/T100154
>
> On Mon, Sep 7, 2015 at 3:36 PM, Comet styles  wrote
>
> > contrary to the name, it doesn't actually have 'internet access'
> > ..they can read, but not contribute..
> >
> > On 9/8/15, Jane Darnell  wrote:
> > > Good idea. I watched a report on TV where they said some refugees have
> > been
> > > waiting for years for processing. It would be nice for them to be able
> to
> > > use and maybe contribute to Wikipedia while they are waiting. Maybe we
> > > should set up edit-a-thons and wikiclasses about life in Europe and the
> > > politics of the crisis, for the refugees and the Europeans both!
> > >
> > > On Mon, Sep 7, 2015 at 9:45 PM, Leinonen Teemu <
> teemu.leino...@aalto.fi>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > >> Hello people,
> > >>
> > >> Just an idea. Number of Syrian refugees is over 4,000,000 people,
> mostly
> > >> residing in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq.[1] Refugee camps are set
> > in
> > >> all in these countries.[2]
> > >>
> > >> Internet-in-a-Box[3] is a a WiFI-device with "Wikipedia in 37
> > languages, a
> > >> library of 40,000 e-books, most of the world's open source software
> and
> > >> source code, hundreds of hours of instructional videos, and world-wide
> > >> mapping down to street level.”
> > >>
> > >> Could we as a movement get the internet-in-a-box to the refugee camps?
> > >>
> > >> - Teemu
> > >>
> > >> [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refugees_of_the_Syrian_Civil_War
> > >> [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_refugee_camps
> > >> [3] http://internet-in-a-box.org
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> Teemu Leinonen
> > >> http://teemuleinonen.fi
> > >> ___
> > >> Wikimedia-l mailing list, guidelines at:
> > >> https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Mailing_lists/Guidelines
> > >> Wikimedia-l@lists.wikimedia.org
> > >> Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimedia-l
> ,
> > >> 
> > > ___
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> > > Wikimedia-l@lists.wikimedia.org
> > > Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimedia-l,
> > > 
> >
> >
> > --
> > Cometstyles
> >
> > ___
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> >
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> > 

Re: [Wikimedia-l] internet-in-a-boxs to the refugee camps?

2015-09-09 Thread Theo10011
Heh, It's times like these I realize I'm still in a minority here. As one
of the few non-american/european readers of the list, my perspective,
differs on this issue.

I don't know what people imagine when they think of the conditions in these
refugee camps. Allow me to paint a picture using commons [1][2] - These
places have some of the highest population density anywhere in the world.
Most have make-shift housing - tents or shanty, electricity - which is
mostly for a single light or to charge an old phone - is unreliable, water
in tankers has to be collected in jars and carried back[4]. Sanitation,
roads - if such things exist, are equally troublesome. The designated
monthly food vouchers/allowance, if they can get, is already being cut [3].
Add to that some petty crime and occasional police clashes. There's always
the constant fear of outliving their host countries welcome, and being
thrown out, left homeless. All that remains is just a harsh desert, a few
sandstorms.

These are people fleeing their homes from a civil war, with no end in
sight. Food, water, shelter, safety and their own dignity has to rank
higher as a major concern. I'm not saying that we can't help, just that we
figure lower in priorities from avoiding a civil war, genocide, to just
surviving - things are far from stable at these places still, sadly. These
refugees don't even have a legal status in most places, when they do it is
only temporary.

On Tue, Sep 8, 2015 at 1:15 AM, Leinonen Teemu 
wrote:

> Hello people,
>
> Just an idea. Number of Syrian refugees is over 4,000,000 people, mostly
> residing in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq.[1] Refugee camps are set in
> all in these countries.[2]
>

Between ISIS and kurdish forces, Iraq and Turkey are likely to have some
instability in these camps. Turkey with the highest number of refugees has
concentrated them at overcrowded refugee camps at borders while denying
them refugee status. Lebanon refuses to set up any refugee camps, Jordan
might have some of the highest density population center on earth, at one
of its two camps. While the other gulf states have outright refused these
refugees.


>
> Internet-in-a-Box[3] is a a WiFI-device with "Wikipedia in 37 languages, a
> library of 40,000 e-books, most of the world's open source software and
> source code, hundreds of hours of instructional videos, and world-wide
> mapping down to street level.”
>

This device sounds like a portable hotspot with an attached storage.

I don't understand however, what device people would use to access this
hotspot? ios, android- smartphones aren't as common in that part of the
world yet. And you would still need electricity to charge those devices,
all that remains is the language barrier...

Anyway, I think we already have something better - Wikipedia Zero. It was
designed for very similar situations. We just need some sort of a carrier
relationship to avail free access for everyone with a phone in those
region, I seem to recall a light text only version too that would work on
any phone. The carriers might even be receptive to the idea, if approached
correctly - Kul might know.

Regards
Theo


[1]
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:An_Aerial_View_of_the_Za'atri_Refugee_Camp.jpg
[2]
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Syrian_refugee_camp_on_theTurkish_border.jpg
[3]http://www.unhcr.org/55b7737b6.html
[4]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Children_filling_water_in_Al-Zaatari_Camp.jpg


> Could we as a movement get the internet-in-a-box to the refugee camps?
>
> - Teemu
>
> [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refugees_of_the_Syrian_Civil_War
> [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_refugee_camps
> [3] http://internet-in-a-box.org
>
> --
> Teemu Leinonen
> http://teemuleinonen.fi
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] internet-in-a-boxs to the refugee camps?

2015-09-09 Thread Pine W
I think that access to open-access, easily accessible and editable maps
might be quite helpful to refugees. Info about different countries'
policies and practices toward migrants might also be helpful.

Pine
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Collaboration team reprioritization

2015-09-09 Thread Pine W
Something that I would find interesting is a more detailed explanation of
the reasoning behind the decision to put Flow into maintenance mode instead
of continuing efforts to make it suitible for more diverse purposes. I'm
not sure that Flow could ever fully replace all talk pages, but I tilt in
favor of simplified interfaces for newcomers.

Pine
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Collaboration team reprioritization

2015-09-09 Thread Ryan Lane
MZMcBride  mzmcbride.com> writes:

> 
> Forwarding this to wikimedia-l as it doesn't seem to be very technical in
> nature, but definitely seems worthy of discussion.
> 
> MZMcBride
> 
> Danny Horn wrote:
> >For a while now, the Collaboration team has been working on Flow, the
> >structured discussion system. I want to let you know about some changes in
> >that long-term plan.
> >
> >While initial announcements about Flow said that it would be a universal
> >replacement for talk pages, the features that were ultimately built into
> >Flow were specifically forum-style group discussion tools. But article and
> >project talk pages are used for a number of important and complex
> >processes that those tools aren't able to handle, making Flow unsuitable
> >for deployment on those kinds of pages.
> >
> >To better address the needs of our core contributors, we're now focusing
> >our strategy on the curation, collaboration, and admin processes that take
> >place on a variety of pages. Many of these processes use complex
> >workarounds -- templates, categories, transclusions, and lots of
> >instructions -- that turn blank wikitext talk pages into structured
> >workflows. There are gadgets and user scripts on the larger wikis to help
> >with some of these workflows, but these tools aren't standardized or
> >universally available.
> >

Nearly every ambitious project starts with huge promises and fizzles out
with a "change in focus". What's the underlying issue here? How can we get a
product to a point where it's deployed and usable? I know there's a problem
with scope creep for Wikimedia projects (due to design by committee), but
that alone can't be the reason.

I know no one wants to admit failure, but when WMF says something is in
maintenance mode they really mean they're killing the project. Can there be
a postmortem for this, so that we can at least learn something from the failure?

- Ryan


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] internet-in-a-boxs to the refugee camps?

2015-09-09 Thread Emmanuel Engelhart
On 08.09.2015 20:37, Leinonen Teemu wrote:
> On 8.9.2015, at 20.04, Keegan Peterzell  wrote:
>> However, before we get all excited with plans, it might be important for
>> someone who is interested to contact the project lead and see if
>> internet-in-a-box is even still active. The website hasn't been regularly
>> updated since April of 2013. If there are no resources available from the
>> project still then it's back to square one.​
> 
> Right. I think we should not go with the internet-in-a-box, but rather with 
> the Kiwix. See: http://www.kiwix.org/wiki/Kiwix-plug 

Side information: Projects like internet-in-a-box (merged meanwhile with
xsce school server) or Ideas Box use anyway Kiwix and ZIM files to
provide Wikipedia (and also other content) offline.

Emmanuel
-- 
Kiwix - Wikipedia Offline & more
* Web: http://www.kiwix.org
* Twitter: https://twitter.com/KiwixOffline
* more: http://www.kiwix.org/wiki/Communication



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] internet-in-a-boxs to the refugee camps?

2015-09-09 Thread Emmanuel Engelhart
On 08.09.2015 21:47, Tito Dutta wrote:
>> If so, perhaps it is worth co-ordinating with some disaster
>> relief NGOs such as MSF, Red Cross and Oxfam?

This is the point. Concerning offline, the technology works. The problem
is definitively the lack of advertisement/awareness/coordination with
NGOs which are on the field.

Emmanuel
-- 
Kiwix - Wikipedia Offline & more
* Web: http://www.kiwix.org
* Twitter: https://twitter.com/KiwixOffline
* more: http://www.kiwix.org/wiki/Communication



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