[WISPA] Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Dawn DiPietro


By Jeffrey Silva
May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON—Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate 
lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of 
spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband 
public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial wireless 
carriers and include an interoperability capability policy-makers have 
repeatedly call for—without success—since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists 
attacks.


“We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the most 
advanced technology to support those services that meet its stringent 
requirements to provide safety and security to all Americans. Congress 
and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot afford to pass an 
opportunity to explore the availability of an additional 30 megahertz of 
spectrum that would meet public safety’s needs as well as elevate the 
safety of all Americans,” stated the organizations in a letter to Senate 
Commerce Committee Chairman Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel’s 
ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel Inouye (Hawaii).


The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety 
Communications Officials-International, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major Cities 
Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs’ Association and National 
Sheriffs’ Association.


The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call 
Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided 
whether to endorse it. “However,” they stated, “we do believe that the 
concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz band 
in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety broadband 
communications is worthy of public discussion.”


A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to 
auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and 
777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to avoid.


Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan 
O’Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the 
then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch frequencies 
to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint Nextel Corp.). 
Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at that time. 
National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten either about 
Nextel’s successful campaign to remedy interference Nextel caused to 800 
MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10 megahertz of spectrum 
in the 1.9 GHz band.


Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet 
subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright opposition 
to Cyren’s proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren submitted its 
proposal to the FCC on April 27. The Michigan lawmaker argued the plan 
would disrupt the balance in legislation that forced broadcasters to 
surrender 700 MHz as part of their transition to digital technology, set 
aside 24 megahertz for public safety and earmarked $1 billion for 
public-safety interoperability deployment. The 24 megahertz already 
reserved for public safety is adjacent to the separate, clear chunk of 
30 megahertz at the heart of Cyren’s initiative. The 30 megahertz is 
potentially worth billions of dollars in auction receipts for the U.S. 
Treasury. In addition to mobile-phone carriers, wireless Internet and 
computer firms have expressed interest in the 700 MHz spectrum to drive 
WiMAX and other wireless broadband technologies.


“While the FCC is currently exploring whether its rules should be 
modified to permit broadband use in a portion of the 24 megahertz now 
allotted for wideband use, that will only address a small part of public 
safety’s future requirements. As we have argued since the Public Safety 
Wireless Advisory Committee report of 1996, an additional spectrum 
allocation is needed,” the six public-safety associations told Stevens 
and Inouye.


Link below ;
http://rcrnews.com/news.cms?newsId=26358
---
---

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Re: [WISPA] WISPA Promotional Marketiing Committee membership openings

2006-05-14 Thread John Scrivner
There is a new list server for this committee which is 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] You can subscribe to this list by going to 
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/Promotion and filling out 
the online subscription form. I know we will all be rewarded by the 
efforts of this committee to help our industry and I applaud those of 
you who agree to help.

Kindest regards,
John Scrivner


George Rogato wrote:


To All WISPA Members

The WISPA Board of Directors, during the March Board of Directors
meeting, created the WISPA Promotional Marketing Committee to promote
it's WISPA Members, WISPA and the wisp industry in general.

During the formation of WISPA there were comments regarding what is
WISPA going to do to help us, the wisps. Some said the question was what
are the wisps going to do to help WISPA.

The answer is together, WISPA and it's member wisps, can help us help
ourselves. One such way is the WISPA Promotional Marketing Committee.
What is needed now is for the member wisps who have experience and
talent in the area of promotion and marketing to help put in motion a
marketing campaign to promote WISPA and it's member wisps.

At this time the Marketing committee has just myself, George Rogato of
OregonFAST.net, and Tom DeReggi of Rapiddsl.net.

The committee will communicate via a dedicated email list and the time
needed to work on the committee shouldn't need much more than a couple
hours a week, if that.

We need some volunteers to get this going.

Email me off list at [EMAIL PROTECTED]

Thanks

George









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[WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Travis Johnson

Hi,

I'm not sure about other parts of the country, but here in Idaho they 
have been using 700mhz for city/county emergency services. Many towers 
have expensive ($100k) point to point links to feed the system, and then 
a full rack of equipment inside. The idea is that every emergency 
service would be able to communicate with each other using only 1 radio. 
They will also have voice and data services from that same radio, and 
it's fully roaming.


I only know of two towers with it running, but there are plans to 
install several more systems this summer.


Travis
Microserv

Dawn DiPietro wrote:



By Jeffrey Silva
May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON—Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate 
lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of 
spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband 
public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial 
wireless carriers and include an interoperability capability 
policy-makers have repeatedly call for—without success—since the Sept. 
11, 2001, terrorists attacks.


“We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the 
most advanced technology to support those services that meet its 
stringent requirements to provide safety and security to all 
Americans. Congress and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot 
afford to pass an opportunity to explore the availability of an 
additional 30 megahertz of spectrum that would meet public safety’s 
needs as well as elevate the safety of all Americans,” stated the 
organizations in a letter to Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ted 
Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel’s ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel 
Inouye (Hawaii).


The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety 
Communications Officials-International, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major 
Cities Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs’ Association and 
National Sheriffs’ Association.


The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call 
Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided 
whether to endorse it. “However,” they stated, “we do believe that the 
concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz 
band in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety 
broadband communications is worthy of public discussion.”


A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to 
auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and 
777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to 
avoid.


Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan 
O’Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the 
then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch 
frequencies to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint 
Nextel Corp.). Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at 
that time. National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten 
either about Nextel’s successful campaign to remedy interference 
Nextel caused to 800 MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10 
megahertz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band.


Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet 
subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright 
opposition to Cyren’s proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren 
submitted its proposal to the FCC on April 27. The Michigan lawmaker 
argued the plan would disrupt the balance in legislation that forced 
broadcasters to surrender 700 MHz as part of their transition to 
digital technology, set aside 24 megahertz for public safety and 
earmarked $1 billion for public-safety interoperability deployment. 
The 24 megahertz already reserved for public safety is adjacent to the 
separate, clear chunk of 30 megahertz at the heart of Cyren’s 
initiative. The 30 megahertz is potentially worth billions of dollars 
in auction receipts for the U.S. Treasury. In addition to mobile-phone 
carriers, wireless Internet and computer firms have expressed interest 
in the 700 MHz spectrum to drive WiMAX and other wireless broadband 
technologies.


“While the FCC is currently exploring whether its rules should be 
modified to permit broadband use in a portion of the 24 megahertz now 
allotted for wideband use, that will only address a small part of 
public safety’s future requirements. As we have argued since the 
Public Safety Wireless Advisory Committee report of 1996, an 
additional spectrum allocation is needed,” the six public-safety 
associations told Stevens and Inouye.


Link below ;
http://rcrnews.com/news.cms?newsId=26358
---
---


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Re: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Joe Laura
Sure would be nice if I could get the City here to backhaul their tropos
units with something other than 5.2/5.8. Im sure something is available for
City use. I did see a new Alvarion flat panel show up last week at a fire
station, no telling what freq though. They were using canopy.
Superior Wireless
New Orleans,La.
www.superior1.com
- Original Message -
From: Travis Johnson [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org;
isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 10:52 AM
Subject: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz
spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan


 Hi,

 I'm not sure about other parts of the country, but here in Idaho they
 have been using 700mhz for city/county emergency services. Many towers
 have expensive ($100k) point to point links to feed the system, and then
 a full rack of equipment inside. The idea is that every emergency
 service would be able to communicate with each other using only 1 radio.
 They will also have voice and data services from that same radio, and
 it's fully roaming.

 I only know of two towers with it running, but there are plans to
 install several more systems this summer.

 Travis
 Microserv

 Dawn DiPietro wrote:

 
  By Jeffrey Silva
  May 12, 2006
  WASHINGTON—Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate
  lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of
  spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband
  public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial
  wireless carriers and include an interoperability capability
  policy-makers have repeatedly call for—without success—since the Sept.
  11, 2001, terrorists attacks.
 
  “We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the
  most advanced technology to support those services that meet its
  stringent requirements to provide safety and security to all
  Americans. Congress and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot
  afford to pass an opportunity to explore the availability of an
  additional 30 megahertz of spectrum that would meet public safety’s
  needs as well as elevate the safety of all Americans,” stated the
  organizations in a letter to Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ted
  Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel’s ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel
  Inouye (Hawaii).
 
  The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety
  Communications Officials-International, International Association of
  Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major
  Cities Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs’ Association and
  National Sheriffs’ Association.
 
  The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call
  Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided
  whether to endorse it. “However,” they stated, “we do believe that the
  concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz
  band in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety
  broadband communications is worthy of public discussion.”
 
  A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to
  auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and
  777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to
  avoid.
 
  Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan
  O’Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the
  then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch
  frequencies to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint
  Nextel Corp.). Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at
  that time. National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten
  either about Nextel’s successful campaign to remedy interference
  Nextel caused to 800 MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10
  megahertz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band.
 
  Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet
  subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright
  opposition to Cyren’s proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren
  submitted its proposal to the FCC on April 27. The Michigan lawmaker
  argued the plan would disrupt the balance in legislation that forced
  broadcasters to surrender 700 MHz as part of their transition to
  digital technology, set aside 24 megahertz for public safety and
  earmarked $1 billion for public-safety interoperability deployment.
  The 24 megahertz already reserved for public safety is adjacent to the
  separate, clear chunk of 30 megahertz at the heart of Cyren’s
  initiative. The 30 megahertz is potentially worth billions of dollars
  in auction receipts for the U.S. Treasury. In addition to mobile-phone
  carriers, wireless Internet and computer firms have expressed interest
  in the 700 MHz spectrum to drive WiMAX and other wireless broadband
  technologies.
 
  “While the FCC is currently exploring whether its rules should be
  modified to 

Re: [WISPA] 900 MHz Under Attack

2006-05-14 Thread Dylan Oliver
Sure it can. But it makes a lot more sense for someone to post the basic who-what-where-when's with a message right off the batt.
On 5/13/06, Dawn DiPietro [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Dylan,Google can be your friend at times like these.Here is a link.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=enq=new+america+foundation+btnG=Google+SearchNever mind why would a wisp need 900 Mhz anyways?Police mobility? Nah.My apologies to the list,Dawn DiPietro
Dylan Oliver wrote: By who? Why? When? Who's [EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
? etc. On 5/12/06, *John Scrivner*  [EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 There is an effort being peing used today by WISPs, Muini's, etc. to bring broadband to the masses where nothing else will do the job. Send your stories to: 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Here is my 900 MHz usage example: Mt. Vernon. Net, Inc. is a WISP (Wireless Internet Service
 Provider) in rural Southern Illinois. Our entire business model is based on serving broadband to markets where service is either not available or not widely
 available. There are many trees in Southern Illinois. These trees have a tendancy to make WiFi and other low-power, higher-frequency wireless broadband options very weak for delivery of broadband due to
 absorption of the signal by the trees. This means many people cannot get the signal even when in close proximity to a tower location. The only option available to WISP operations in these conditions is 900 MHz broadband
 delivery. This unlicensed 900 MHz band is used in 40% of all my rural customer connections. Mt. Vernon. Net was fortunate enough to receive grant funding through the USDA Rural Utility Service to provide broadband to customers
 in the small town of Bluford, Illinois. This town of roughly 750 people had no other broadband at all. They also had many mature trees all over town. The only way to effectively serve this community was with 900 MHz
 Waverider brand equipment. The system is now online and works flawlessly. The best example of the importance of this 900 MHz system in rural broadband delivery was in a the case last year of a young man in
 Bluford who developed Leukemia. He had to have a bone marrow transplant which led to his complete isolation from all people to stop any possible infection. The transplant left him with no immune system. This
 young man could have easily died. His biggest concern though was finishing school with his 2nd grade class. We used the 900 MHz wireless system to deliver a virtual classroom connection for this young man. He could pan, tilt
 and zoom a camera from his web browser at home as if he were at school. 900 MHz broadband technology is the secret sauce in making stories like this possible. It is the ONLY option WISPs have in bringing
 rural broadband online quickly and efficiently when other technologies will not do the job.. The unlicensed 900 MHz technology we are using is an absolute necessity in making rural broadband options available
 today in all of the United States. John Scrivner President Mt. Vernon. Net, Inc. -- WISPA Wireless List: 
wireless@wispa.org mailto:wireless@wispa.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless
 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/ -- Dylan Oliver Primaverity, LLC
No virus found in this incoming message.Checked by AVG Free Edition.Version: 7.1.392 / Virus Database: 
268.5.6/338 - Release Date: 5/12/2006WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.orgSubscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wirelessArchives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/-- 
Dylan OliverPrimaverity, LLC 
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[WISPA] High-Definition Video Could Choke Internet

2006-05-14 Thread George Rogato

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060514/ap_on_hi_te/net_neutrality;_ylt=AnePk4SuhEyDtod39192oZojtBAF;_ylu=X3oDMTA5aHJvMDdwBHNlYwN5bmNhdA--

Are you prepared?

George
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RE: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Gino A. Villarini
Travis,

Care to share how the city got a 700 mhz license ?



Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 11:53 AM
To: WISPA General List; isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com
Subject: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz
spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

Hi,

I'm not sure about other parts of the country, but here in Idaho they 
have been using 700mhz for city/county emergency services. Many towers 
have expensive ($100k) point to point links to feed the system, and then 
a full rack of equipment inside. The idea is that every emergency 
service would be able to communicate with each other using only 1 radio. 
They will also have voice and data services from that same radio, and 
it's fully roaming.

I only know of two towers with it running, but there are plans to 
install several more systems this summer.

Travis
Microserv

Dawn DiPietro wrote:


 By Jeffrey Silva
 May 12, 2006
 WASHINGTON-Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate 
 lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of 
 spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband 
 public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial 
 wireless carriers and include an interoperability capability 
 policy-makers have repeatedly call for-without success-since the Sept. 
 11, 2001, terrorists attacks.

 We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the 
 most advanced technology to support those services that meet its 
 stringent requirements to provide safety and security to all 
 Americans. Congress and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot 
 afford to pass an opportunity to explore the availability of an 
 additional 30 megahertz of spectrum that would meet public safety's 
 needs as well as elevate the safety of all Americans, stated the 
 organizations in a letter to Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ted 
 Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel's ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel 
 Inouye (Hawaii).

 The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety 
 Communications Officials-International, International Association of 
 Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major 
 Cities Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs' Association and 
 National Sheriffs' Association.

 The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call 
 Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided 
 whether to endorse it. However, they stated, we do believe that the 
 concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz 
 band in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety 
 broadband communications is worthy of public discussion.

 A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to 
 auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and 
 777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to 
 avoid.

 Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan 
 O'Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the 
 then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch 
 frequencies to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint 
 Nextel Corp.). Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at 
 that time. National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten 
 either about Nextel's successful campaign to remedy interference 
 Nextel caused to 800 MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10 
 megahertz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band.

 Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet 
 subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright 
 opposition to Cyren's proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren 
 submitted its proposal to the FCC on April 27. The Michigan lawmaker 
 argued the plan would disrupt the balance in legislation that forced 
 broadcasters to surrender 700 MHz as part of their transition to 
 digital technology, set aside 24 megahertz for public safety and 
 earmarked $1 billion for public-safety interoperability deployment. 
 The 24 megahertz already reserved for public safety is adjacent to the 
 separate, clear chunk of 30 megahertz at the heart of Cyren's 
 initiative. The 30 megahertz is potentially worth billions of dollars 
 in auction receipts for the U.S. Treasury. In addition to mobile-phone 
 carriers, wireless Internet and computer firms have expressed interest 
 in the 700 MHz spectrum to drive WiMAX and other wireless broadband 
 technologies.

 While the FCC is currently exploring whether its rules should be 
 modified to permit broadband use in a portion of the 24 megahertz now 
 allotted for wideband use, that will only address a small part of 
 public safety's future requirements. As we have argued 

Re: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Travis Johnson

Hi,

It's not the city, but rather County and State. I have no idea how they 
did it... but there was BIG money available after 9/11 to setup these 
type of systems.


Travis
Microserv


Gino A. Villarini wrote:


Travis,

Care to share how the city got a 700 mhz license ?



Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 11:53 AM
To: WISPA General List; isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com
Subject: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz
spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

Hi,

I'm not sure about other parts of the country, but here in Idaho they 
have been using 700mhz for city/county emergency services. Many towers 
have expensive ($100k) point to point links to feed the system, and then 
a full rack of equipment inside. The idea is that every emergency 
service would be able to communicate with each other using only 1 radio. 
They will also have voice and data services from that same radio, and 
it's fully roaming.


I only know of two towers with it running, but there are plans to 
install several more systems this summer.


Travis
Microserv

Dawn DiPietro wrote:

 


By Jeffrey Silva
May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON-Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate 
lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of 
spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband 
public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial 
wireless carriers and include an interoperability capability 
policy-makers have repeatedly call for-without success-since the Sept. 
11, 2001, terrorists attacks.


We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the 
most advanced technology to support those services that meet its 
stringent requirements to provide safety and security to all 
Americans. Congress and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot 
afford to pass an opportunity to explore the availability of an 
additional 30 megahertz of spectrum that would meet public safety's 
needs as well as elevate the safety of all Americans, stated the 
organizations in a letter to Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ted 
Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel's ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel 
Inouye (Hawaii).


The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety 
Communications Officials-International, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major 
Cities Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs' Association and 
National Sheriffs' Association.


The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call 
Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided 
whether to endorse it. However, they stated, we do believe that the 
concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz 
band in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety 
broadband communications is worthy of public discussion.


A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to 
auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and 
777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to 
avoid.


Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan 
O'Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the 
then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch 
frequencies to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint 
Nextel Corp.). Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at 
that time. National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten 
either about Nextel's successful campaign to remedy interference 
Nextel caused to 800 MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10 
megahertz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band.


Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet 
subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright 
opposition to Cyren's proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren 
submitted its proposal to the FCC on April 27. The Michigan lawmaker 
argued the plan would disrupt the balance in legislation that forced 
broadcasters to surrender 700 MHz as part of their transition to 
digital technology, set aside 24 megahertz for public safety and 
earmarked $1 billion for public-safety interoperability deployment. 
The 24 megahertz already reserved for public safety is adjacent to the 
separate, clear chunk of 30 megahertz at the heart of Cyren's 
initiative. The 30 megahertz is potentially worth billions of dollars 
in auction receipts for the U.S. Treasury. In addition to mobile-phone 
carriers, wireless Internet and computer firms have expressed interest 
in the 700 MHz spectrum to drive WiMAX and other wireless broadband 
technologies.


While the FCC is currently exploring whether its rules should be 
modified to permit broadband 

RE: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Gino A. Villarini
Do you have specific info ? freq ? call sing ? County state?  

Going to the fcc site to investigate

Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 7:56 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating
700MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

Hi,

It's not the city, but rather County and State. I have no idea how they 
did it... but there was BIG money available after 9/11 to setup these 
type of systems.

Travis
Microserv


Gino A. Villarini wrote:

Travis,

Care to share how the city got a 700 mhz license ?



Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 11:53 AM
To: WISPA General List; isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com
Subject: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz
spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

Hi,

I'm not sure about other parts of the country, but here in Idaho they 
have been using 700mhz for city/county emergency services. Many towers 
have expensive ($100k) point to point links to feed the system, and then 
a full rack of equipment inside. The idea is that every emergency 
service would be able to communicate with each other using only 1 radio. 
They will also have voice and data services from that same radio, and 
it's fully roaming.

I only know of two towers with it running, but there are plans to 
install several more systems this summer.

Travis
Microserv

Dawn DiPietro wrote:

  

By Jeffrey Silva
May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON-Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate 
lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of 
spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband 
public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial 
wireless carriers and include an interoperability capability 
policy-makers have repeatedly call for-without success-since the Sept. 
11, 2001, terrorists attacks.

We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the 
most advanced technology to support those services that meet its 
stringent requirements to provide safety and security to all 
Americans. Congress and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot 
afford to pass an opportunity to explore the availability of an 
additional 30 megahertz of spectrum that would meet public safety's 
needs as well as elevate the safety of all Americans, stated the 
organizations in a letter to Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ted 
Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel's ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel 
Inouye (Hawaii).

The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety 
Communications Officials-International, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major 
Cities Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs' Association and 
National Sheriffs' Association.

The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call 
Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided 
whether to endorse it. However, they stated, we do believe that the 
concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz 
band in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety 
broadband communications is worthy of public discussion.

A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to 
auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and 
777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to 
avoid.

Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan 
O'Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the 
then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch 
frequencies to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint 
Nextel Corp.). Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at 
that time. National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten 
either about Nextel's successful campaign to remedy interference 
Nextel caused to 800 MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10 
megahertz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band.

Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet 
subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright 
opposition to Cyren's proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren 
submitted its proposal to the FCC on April 27. The Michigan lawmaker 
argued the plan would disrupt the balance in legislation that forced 
broadcasters to surrender 700 MHz as part of their transition to 
digital technology, set aside 24 megahertz for public safety and 
earmarked $1 billion for public-safety interoperability deployment. 
The 24 megahertz already reserved for 

Re: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

2006-05-14 Thread Travis Johnson

Hi,

You can check either Clark or Bannock counties in Idaho. 700mhz is all 
they tell me.


Around here, it is the 2-way radio guys that are doing all of it... and 
it's a lot of work (just watching how many times they have had to go up 
to a certain tower to fix things).


Travis
Microserv

Gino A. Villarini wrote:

Do you have specific info ? freq ? call sing ? County state?  


Going to the fcc site to investigate

Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 7:56 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating
700MHz spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

Hi,

It's not the city, but rather County and State. I have no idea how they 
did it... but there was BIG money available after 9/11 to setup these 
type of systems.


Travis
Microserv


Gino A. Villarini wrote:

 


Travis,

Care to share how the city got a 700 mhz license ?



Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 11:53 AM
To: WISPA General List; isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com
Subject: [WISPA] Re: Six public-safety groups support reallocating 700 MHz
spectrum, but have yet to endorse Cyren plan

Hi,

I'm not sure about other parts of the country, but here in Idaho they 
have been using 700mhz for city/county emergency services. Many towers 
have expensive ($100k) point to point links to feed the system, and then 
a full rack of equipment inside. The idea is that every emergency 
service would be able to communicate with each other using only 1 radio. 
They will also have voice and data services from that same radio, and 
it's fully roaming.


I only know of two towers with it running, but there are plans to 
install several more systems this summer.


Travis
Microserv

Dawn DiPietro wrote:



   


By Jeffrey Silva
May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON-Law enforcement and first-responder groups asked key Senate 
lawmakers to consider a private-sector plan to designate a block of 
spectrum in the 700 MHz band for a national wireless broadband 
public-safety network, one that would be shared with commercial 
wireless carriers and include an interoperability capability 
policy-makers have repeatedly call for-without success-since the Sept. 
11, 2001, terrorists attacks.


We are dedicated to ensuring that public safety has access to the 
most advanced technology to support those services that meet its 
stringent requirements to provide safety and security to all 
Americans. Congress and the [Federal Communications Commission] cannot 
afford to pass an opportunity to explore the availability of an 
additional 30 megahertz of spectrum that would meet public safety's 
needs as well as elevate the safety of all Americans, stated the 
organizations in a letter to Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Ted 
Stevens (R-Alaska) and the panel's ranking Democrat, Sen. Daniel 
Inouye (Hawaii).


The letter was signed by officials of the Association of Public-Safety 
Communications Officials-International, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, International Association of Fire Chiefs, Major 
Cities Chiefs Association, Major County Sheriffs' Association and 
National Sheriffs' Association.


The groups said they are studying the proposal submitted by Cyren Call 
Communications Inc. to the FCC late last month, and have not decided 
whether to endorse it. However, they stated, we do believe that the 
concept of reallocating the 30 megahertz of spectrum in the 700 MHz 
band in a manner that would promote interoperable, public-safety 
broadband communications is worthy of public discussion.


A public debate that could prompt lawmakers to reconsider plans to 
auction by February 2008 valuable spectrum in the 747-762 MHz and 
777-792 MHz bands is precisely what the cell-phone industry wants to 
avoid.


Mobile-phone carriers are keenly aware of how Cyren Chairman Morgan 
O'Brien won over policy-makers in the late 1980s when he presented the 
then-radical idea of cobbling together narrow radio dispatch 
frequencies to create Nextel Communications Inc. (now part of Sprint 
Nextel Corp.). Nextel became a competitor to the cellular duopoly at 
that time. National mobile-phone carrier executives have not forgotten 
either about Nextel's successful campaign to remedy interference 
Nextel caused to 800 MHz radio systems in a way that secured Nextel 10 
megahertz of spectrum in the 1.9 GHz band.


Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), chairman of the House telecom and Internet 
subcommittee, is the only lawmaker to publicly voice outright 
opposition to Cyren's proposal. Upton did so shortly after Cyren 
submitted its proposal to the FCC on April