RE: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

2006-01-16 Thread Paul Hendry
Radios are WRAP/CM9's with StarOS on RadioWaves SPD2-5.2NS. Is there
anything special you do/use to get this to work? Only things I can see that
would help are band pass filters.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Bob Moldashel
Sent: 15 January 2006 23:53
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

I should revise that to say we do it on dual polarity antennas.  Not 2 
radios on one antenna

-B-



Bob Moldashel wrote:

 Paul,

 We do this all the time.  Explain what model radios and how you are 
 doing this??  I'll try to help.

 -B-




 Paul Hendry wrote:

 Has anyone successfully installed more than 1 radio on a single 
 antenna with virtually no interference between links? We had 
 originally planned to run 2 simultaneous links on dual polarized 5GHz 
 RadioWaves parabolics however once installed we found that only 1 
 link could be used at any one time regardless of channel separation 
 due to interference. Now the set-up is being used to provide 
 redundancy but would much prefer double the capacity. If anyone has 
 achieved a similar thing would they share how they achieved it? 
 Hoping that some 5GHz band pass filters could be the answer but can 
 only locate 2.4 variants at present L

  

 Cheers,

  

 P.

  




-- 
Bob Moldashel
Lakeland Communications, Inc.
Broadband Deployment Group
1350 Lincoln Avenue
Holbrook, New York 11741 USA
800-479-9195 Toll Free US  Canada
631-585-5558 Fax
516-551-1131 Cell

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[WISPA] Coverage in Southeast Missouri?

2006-01-16 Thread Steve Stroh


Any WISPs in Southeast Missouri?

I was contacted by a nice Deputy Sherriff who had bought his own laptop 
for doing work in his patrol car and was hoping to find at least 
partial mobile Broadband coverage in his area (444 square miles, as he 
describes it.)


If you provide service in Southeast Missouri, please contact me off 
list and I'll put you and the Deputy Sherriff in touch.



Thanks,

Steve

---

Steve Stroh
425-939-0076 | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.stevestroh.com

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Re: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

2006-01-16 Thread Bob Moldashel
Radios can't be on the same channels obviously. We have a link presently 
running with the same configuration 2 channels apart without issues.  A 
dual polarity antenna is going to seperate the two by 15-25 dB.  Make 
sure the tx power is equal on both radios and it should work without issue.


Now if we could just get the freakin' routing to work correctly we would 
be fine.


-B-



Paul Hendry wrote:


Radios are WRAP/CM9's with StarOS on RadioWaves SPD2-5.2NS. Is there
anything special you do/use to get this to work? Only things I can see that
would help are band pass filters.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Bob Moldashel
Sent: 15 January 2006 23:53
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

I should revise that to say we do it on dual polarity antennas.  Not 2 
radios on one antenna


-B-



Bob Moldashel wrote:

 


Paul,

We do this all the time.  Explain what model radios and how you are 
doing this??  I'll try to help.


-B-




Paul Hendry wrote:

   

Has anyone successfully installed more than 1 radio on a single 
antenna with virtually no interference between links? We had 
originally planned to run 2 simultaneous links on dual polarized 5GHz 
RadioWaves parabolics however once installed we found that only 1 
link could be used at any one time regardless of channel separation 
due to interference. Now the set-up is being used to provide 
redundancy but would much prefer double the capacity. If anyone has 
achieved a similar thing would they share how they achieved it? 
Hoping that some 5GHz band pass filters could be the answer but can 
only locate 2.4 variants at present L




Cheers,



P.


 





 




--
Bob Moldashel
Lakeland Communications, Inc.
Broadband Deployment Group
1350 Lincoln Avenue
Holbrook, New York 11741 USA
800-479-9195 Toll Free US  Canada
631-585-5558 Fax
516-551-1131 Cell

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RE: [WISPA] Coverage in Southeast Missouri?

2006-01-16 Thread Rick Harnish
Steve,

I believe that would be Sir Butch Evans [EMAIL PROTECTED]  If he
doesn't cover the area, he may know who does.

Rick Harnish
President
OnlyInternet Broadband  Wireless, Inc.
260-827-2482 Office
260-307-4000 Cell
260-918-4340 VoIP
www.oibw.net
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 
  
 

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Steve Stroh
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 9:26 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Coverage in Southeast Missouri?


Any WISPs in Southeast Missouri?

I was contacted by a nice Deputy Sherriff who had bought his own laptop 
for doing work in his patrol car and was hoping to find at least 
partial mobile Broadband coverage in his area (444 square miles, as he 
describes it.)

If you provide service in Southeast Missouri, please contact me off 
list and I'll put you and the Deputy Sherriff in touch.


Thanks,

Steve

---

Steve Stroh
425-939-0076 | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | http://www.stevestroh.com

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Re: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

2006-01-16 Thread Bob Moldashel
Why would you use an isolator   If we are talking possible adjacent 
channel interference then an isolator is not the cure, aditional 
filtering would be.  But most equipment should be able to work in this 
environment without it. I have sites that have 4 WRAP boards with CM9's 
sitting right next to each other on the next adjacent channel with no 
issues.


In addition, the loss of power is not acceptable (though it wouldn't be 
half power at 5GHz.).


-B-



Richard Goodin wrote:

Go to some of the hard core LMR delers and ask for isolators, (They 
will cut your power in half).  Your LMR dealer will need to know 
power, frequency, type of connectors.  This may work, I do not know.


- Original Message -
*From:* Paul Hendry mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
*To:* 'WISPA General List' mailto:wireless@wispa.org
*Sent:* Monday, January 16, 2006 5:14 AM
*Subject:* RE: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

Radios are WRAP/CM9's with StarOS on RadioWaves SPD2-5.2NS. Is there
anything special you do/use to get this to work? Only things I can
see that
would help are band pass filters.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Bob Moldashel
Sent: 15 January 2006 23:53
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Multiple Radios on Single antenna

I should revise that to say we do it on dual polarity antennas. 
Not 2

radios on one antenna

-B-



--
Bob Moldashel
Lakeland Communications, Inc.
Broadband Deployment Group
1350 Lincoln Avenue
Holbrook, New York 11741 USA
800-479-9195 Toll Free US  Canada
631-585-5558 Fax
516-551-1131 Cell

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[WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Jonathan Schmidt



 

  
  
 
  
  



January 16, 2006

Sharing Broadband to Increase Speed 

By JOHN 
MARKOFF

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15 - Two West Coast start-up companies have built new 
wireless technologies that take to heart Benjamin Franklin's exhortation to hang 
together rather than hang separately. 
Both Mushroom Networks, which was started at the University of California, 
San Diego, and WiBoost Inc., based in Seattle, have built prototypes of simple 
wireless systems that make it possible for groups of neighbors to share their 
D.S.L. or cable Internet connections. 
Both companies said that sharing high-speed lines might enable users in small 
neighborhood clusters to download files and Web pages up to 10 times faster. 

The two companies, which developed their technologies separately, are taking 
slightly different approaches. But in both cases, neighbors would be able to 
connect relatively standard wireless routers that would permit their computers 
to receive data in parallel from multiple D.S.L. or cable network connections. 
The idea is similar to adding lanes to a freeway to improve traffic flow.
WiBoost, which is also the name of the company's technology system, now 
requires an antenna mounted outside the home. The company is exploring ways to 
license its technology to manufacturers and hopes to make WiBoost devices 
available for $200 to $300. In flat areas with minimal obstructions, the system 
might be able to link homes separated by several miles, with do-it-yourself 
installation. 
Mushroom Networks is conducting trials using a device called an access point 
aggregator that is similar to a conventional home Wi-Fi 
router. It is intended to be used to connect homes or businesses that are closer 
together. 
In principle, these technologies could work for a large group of neighbors, 
even with just a few Internet access points. That capacity - which could reduce 
the cost of Internet access considerably for its users - could, however, create 
substantial opposition from Internet service providers. Many of them are 
vigilant about restricting the sharing of individual network access points. 
Both companies said they were going to great lengths to assure service 
providers that they did not plan to become bandwidth Napsters, a reference to 
the music file-sharing company that raised havoc with the audio recording 
industry. 
The idea of linking several Internet data channels for greater speed is not a 
new one, but exploring a consumer application for the technology is a fresh 
notion, said Rene L. Cruz, a University of California computer scientist and 
founder of Mushroom Networks.
"We're pretty excited about the concept," he said. "We're looking for 
validation and we're looking for market demand." 
The technology has merits, said George Henny, the president of Whidbey 
Telecom, an independent telecommunications firm based on Whidbey Island, 
Wash.
"There is an interesting potential for this technology," he said, "and it 
would be fun to put it in place."
The concept is related to the concept of wireless mesh networking, a 
technique that is used to extend Wi-Fi and related wireless networking standards 
over large areas by relaying Internet data among wireless receivers. 
In this use, the two firms are exploiting the fact that most computer 
networks are used in an irregular or "bursty" fashion. Even though large numbers 
of users download e-mail, Web pages or music and video files, most of the time 
the networks sit idle, waiting for a computer user to strike a key or issue a 
command.
The capacity utilization rates of modern data networks have long been known 
to be remarkably low. 
"Our studies show that, averaged across all users, the utilization is less 
than 1 percent of the total capacity," said James Baker, president of 
WiBoost.
Telephone companies may oversubscribe the capacity of their D.S.L. lines by 
an average of 14 to 20 times, said Mr. Cruz, and some researchers estimate that 
rate to be as high as 200 to 1. But because the networks are so underutilized, 
they can be used efficiently despite substantial oversubscription.
Neither Mr. Cruz nor Mr. Baker is certain of receiving the blessing of 
Internet service providers, which often go to great lengths to prohibit their 
customers from sharing service with others.
"We don't want freeloaders," said Mr. Baker. "We don't want the perception 
that it might be something that the I.S.P. might not like."
Both companies have approached Internet providers to discuss their ideas, and 
they said they had received some indications of interest. 
One selling point stressed by both companies is that the technology is a 
simple way for D.S.L. providers to match the higher bandwidth offered by cable 
companies.
Moreover, the technology could be used as a "viral" marketing technique by 
Internet service providers if existing customers persuaded neighbors to sign up 
for service to take advantage of the wireless 
accelerator.


-- 
WISPA 

RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Jonathan Schmidt



Well, 
Kurt, here's a piece of the "Terms of Agreement" that a RoadRunner subscriber 
contractually agrees to:

"Subscriber will not resell the Service, or any portion 
thereof, or otherwise charge others to use the Service, or any portion thereof. 
The Service is for personal use only, and Subscriber agrees not to use the 
Service for operation as an Internet Service Provider, to host web sites for 
other parties or for any other business enterprise or to connect the cable modem 
to any server or to any computer outside the Subscriber's 
premises."

. . . 
j o n a t h a n

  -Original Message-From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]On Behalf Of Kurt 
  FankhauserSent: Monday, January 16, 2006 6:28 PMTo: 
  'WISPA General List'Subject: RE: [WISPA] Can you believe 
  this?
  
  That doesnt sound 
  like a good idea, if they even do get it to work they will have a hard time 
  tracking down someone one that is spamming, making viruses, etc. Wonder what 
  those guys were smoking when they thought of that over there in mushroom 
  laboratories? 
  
  
  Kurt 
  Fankhauser
  WAVELINC
  114 
  S. Walnut St.
  Bucyrus, 
  OH 44820
  419-562-6405
  www.wavelinc.com
  
  -Original 
  Message-From: 
  [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Jonathan SchmidtSent: Monday, January 16, 2006 11:16 
  AMTo: WISPA General 
  ListSubject: [WISPA] Can you 
  believe this?
  
  
  
  


  



  
  
  
  
  
  
  January 16, 
  2006
  Sharing 
  Broadband to Increase Speed 
  
  
  By JOHN 
  MARKOFF
  
  SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15 - Two West 
  Coast start-up companies have built new wireless technologies that take to 
  heart Benjamin Franklin's exhortation to hang together rather than hang 
  separately. 
  Both Mushroom Networks, which was 
  started at the University of California, San Diego, and WiBoost Inc., based in 
  Seattle, have built prototypes of simple wireless systems that make it 
  possible for groups of neighbors to share their D.S.L. or cable Internet 
  connections. 
  Both companies said that sharing 
  high-speed lines might enable users in small neighborhood clusters to download 
  files and Web pages up to 10 times faster. 
  The two companies, which developed 
  their technologies separately, are taking slightly different approaches. But 
  in both cases, neighbors would be able to connect relatively standard wireless 
  routers that would permit their computers to receive data in parallel from 
  multiple D.S.L. or cable network connections. The idea is similar to adding 
  lanes to a freeway to improve traffic flow.
  WiBoost, which is also the name of 
  the company's technology system, now requires an antenna mounted outside the 
  home. The company is exploring ways to license its technology to manufacturers 
  and hopes to make WiBoost devices available for $200 to $300. In flat areas 
  with minimal obstructions, the system might be able to link homes separated by 
  several miles, with do-it-yourself installation. 
  Mushroom Networks is conducting 
  trials using a device called an access point aggregator that is similar to a 
  conventional home Wi-Fi 
  router. It is intended to be used to connect homes or businesses that are 
  closer together. 
  In principle, these technologies 
  could work for a large group of neighbors, even with just a few Internet 
  access points. That capacity - which could reduce the cost of Internet access 
  considerably for its users - could, however, create substantial opposition 
  from Internet service providers. Many of them are vigilant about restricting 
  the sharing of individual network access points. 
  Both companies said they were 
  going to great lengths to assure service providers that they did not plan to 
  become bandwidth Napsters, a reference to the music file-sharing company that 
  raised havoc with the audio recording industry. 
  The idea of linking several 
  Internet data channels for greater speed is not a new one, but exploring a 
  consumer application for the technology is a fresh notion, said Rene L. Cruz, 
  a University of California computer scientist and founder of Mushroom 
  Networks.
  "We're pretty excited about the 
  concept," he said. "We're looking for validation and we're looking for market 
  demand." 
  The technology has merits, said 
  George Henny, the president of Whidbey Telecom, an independent 
  telecommunications firm based on Whidbey Island, 
  Wash.
  "There is an interesting potential 
  for this technology," he said, "and it would be fun to put it in 
  place."
  The concept is related to the 
  concept of wireless mesh networking, a technique that is used to extend Wi-Fi 
  and related wireless networking standards over large areas by relaying 
  Internet data among wireless receivers. 
  In this use, the two firms are 
  exploiting the fact that most computer networks are used in an irregular or 
  "bursty" fashion. Even 

RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Kurt Fankhauser









So even if they did get it to work they
cant use it without breaking their contract?





Kurt Fankhauser

WAVELINC

114 S. Walnut St.

Bucyrus, OH 44820

419-562-6405

www.wavelinc.com





-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf
Of Jonathan Schmidt
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 2:02 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Can you
believe this?





Well, Kurt, here's a
piece of the Terms of Agreement that a RoadRunner subscriber
contractually agrees to:











Subscriber will not resell
the Service, or any portion thereof, or otherwise charge others to use the
Service, or any portion thereof. The Service is for personal use only, and
Subscriber agrees not to use the Service for operation as an Internet Service
Provider, to host web sites for other parties or for any other business
enterprise or to connect the cable modem to any server or to any computer outside the
Subscriber's premises.











. . . j o n a t h a n





-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]On Behalf
Of Kurt Fankhauser
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006
6:28 PM
To: 'WISPA General List'
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Can you
believe this?

That doesnt sound
like a good idea, if they even do get it to work they will have a hard time
tracking down someone one that is spamming, making viruses, etc. Wonder what
those guys were smoking when they thought of that over there in mushroom
laboratories? 





Kurt Fankhauser

WAVELINC

114 S. Walnut St.

Bucyrus, OH 44820

419-562-6405

www.wavelinc.com





-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf
Of Jonathan Schmidt
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006
11:16 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Can you believe
this?








 
  
  
  
  
  
  
 





















January 16, 2006



Sharing Broadband
to Increase Speed 





By JOHN MARKOFF







SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15 - Two West Coast start-up
companies have built new wireless technologies that take to heart Benjamin
Franklin's exhortation to hang together rather than hang separately. 

Both Mushroom Networks, which was started at the
University of California, San Diego, and WiBoost Inc., based in Seattle, have
built prototypes of simple wireless systems that make it possible for groups of
neighbors to share their D.S.L. or cable Internet connections. 

Both companies said that sharing high-speed lines
might enable users in small neighborhood clusters to download files and Web
pages up to 10 times faster. 

The two companies, which developed their technologies
separately, are taking slightly different approaches. But in both cases,
neighbors would be able to connect relatively standard wireless routers that
would permit their computers to receive data in parallel from multiple D.S.L.
or cable network connections. The idea is similar to adding lanes to a freeway
to improve traffic flow.

WiBoost, which is also the name of the company's
technology system, now requires an antenna mounted outside the home. The
company is exploring ways to license its technology to manufacturers and hopes
to make WiBoost devices available for $200 to $300. In flat areas with minimal
obstructions, the system might be able to link homes separated by several
miles, with do-it-yourself installation. 

Mushroom Networks is conducting trials using a device
called an access point aggregator that is similar to a conventional home Wi-Fi router. It is intended to be used to connect homes or
businesses that are closer together. 

In principle, these technologies could work for a
large group of neighbors, even with just a few Internet access points. That
capacity - which could reduce the cost of Internet access considerably for its
users - could, however, create substantial opposition from Internet service
providers. Many of them are vigilant about restricting the sharing of
individual network access points. 

Both companies said they were going to great lengths
to assure service providers that they did not plan to become bandwidth
Napsters, a reference to the music file-sharing company that raised havoc with
the audio recording industry. 

The idea of linking several Internet data channels
for greater speed is not a new one, but exploring a consumer application for
the technology is a fresh notion, said Rene L. Cruz, a University of California
computer scientist and founder of Mushroom Networks.

We're pretty excited about the concept,
he said. We're looking for validation and we're looking for market
demand. 

The technology has merits, said George Henny, the
president of Whidbey Telecom, an independent telecommunications firm based on
Whidbey Island, Wash.

There is an interesting potential for this
technology, he said, and it would be fun to put it in place.

The concept is related to the concept of wireless
mesh networking, a technique that is used to extend Wi-Fi and related wireless
networking standards over large areas by 

RE: [WISPA] Coverage in Southeast Missouri?

2006-01-16 Thread Butch Evans

On Mon, 16 Jan 2006, Rick Harnish wrote:


I believe that would be Sir Butch Evans [EMAIL PROTECTED]


WOW!  I got promoted to a Sir! ;-)

--
Butch Evans
BPS Networks  http://www.bpsnetworks.com/
Bernie, MO
Mikrotik Certified Consultant
(http://www.mikrotik.com/consultants.html)
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RE: [WISPA] Coverage in Southeast Missouri?

2006-01-16 Thread Rick Harnish
Yes Sir! ;)

Rick Harnish
President
OnlyInternet Broadband  Wireless, Inc.
260-827-2482 Office
260-307-4000 Cell
260-918-4340 VoIP
www.oibw.net
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 
  
 

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Butch Evans
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 6:35 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Coverage in Southeast Missouri?

On Mon, 16 Jan 2006, Rick Harnish wrote:

I believe that would be Sir Butch Evans [EMAIL PROTECTED]

WOW!  I got promoted to a Sir! ;-)

-- 
Butch Evans
BPS Networks  http://www.bpsnetworks.com/
Bernie, MO
Mikrotik Certified Consultant
(http://www.mikrotik.com/consultants.html)
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[WISPA] Hello all

2006-01-16 Thread Folajimi Atoki
Hi,
I am a new member. I involved in real estate, but dabble in
wireless technology. I have a client who wants to become a strictly
WISP.  Any suggestions on hardware options especially  antennas. Happy
helpings
--
JIMI ATOKI
THE REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS NETWORK
LOAN OFFICER/REAL ESTATE CONSULTANT
866-937-4776 EXT 706
CELL (631)-664-3931
www.thersn.com
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RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread David E. Smith
Jonathan Schmidt wrote:

 But, yes,
 the Terms of Agreement for broadband contracts usually specify limiting
 access to the premises on the address of the contract.  Otherwise, for $50
 an apartment manager could get a router and hub and wire up the building
 and give free Internet access.

It all depends on the ISP. One of my personal favorites is Speakeasy, who
has a special program just for this.

http://www.speakeasy.net/netshare/learnmore/

It's not quite the same, but close. Basically you set up an access point
and secure it yourself, Speakeasy bills them, and give you 80% of whatever
they're billed. The end-user/el-cheapo-WISP-op selects their own price,
Speakeasy bills 'em and gives kickbacks. Basically what a lot of people
are doing anyway, I'm sure, just with more paperwork and less
TOS-violation.

As an aside, Speakeasy's TOS say you can't resell their residential
service plans, but there's no prohibition on this for business plans,
which only average an extra twenty bucks or so per month. They also give
out lots of static IPs on most of their plans, expressly permit end-users
to run most servers, and generally do all sorts of wacky stuff.

Despite working for a WISP, I can't get my company's service at my house.
If it were available here, I'd be a Speakeasy customer in no time, because
they're so friendly to the geek market.

David Smith
MVN.net
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RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Charles Wu
snip
Despite working for a WISP, I can't get my company's service at my house. If
it were available here, I'd be a Speakeasy customer in no time, because
they're so friendly to the geek market.
/snip

Out of curiosity -- how does allowing connection sharing qualify as being
friendly to the geek market?

-Charles

---
WiNOG Austin, TX
March 13-15, 2006
http://www.winog.com 


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Re: [WISPA] Hello all

2006-01-16 Thread Folajimi Atoki
I have an overseas client who wants to start on WISP. He is targeting
residential homes and small businesses.  His budgeting a customer base
of about five thousand and wants to cover a 30 mile radius starting
off. I offered him a product that I am familiar with called the 
smartBridges airBridge which is a reciver placed in each clients home.
AirPoint-PROx Outdoor Access Point which broadcasts the signals form
the base station. Other Hardwares are gotten from the same company.
They function on a different bandwidth which I also took into
consideration. Any one familiar with these products or have any other
suggestions I would appreciate input. Thanks

On 1/16/06, Marlon K. Schafer [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 For antenna stuff please read:
 http://www.odessaoffice.com/wireless/antenna/how_to_pick_the_right_antenna.htm

 As for the rest of your questions, please give us some more details.

 What will the customer base be like?

 How many do you expect?

 What ranges will you need to cover?

 What will you charge?

 And about a hundred more
 marlon

 - Original Message -
 From: Folajimi Atoki [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 5:45 PM
 Subject: [WISPA] Hello all


 Hi,
 I am a new member. I involved in real estate, but dabble in
 wireless technology. I have a client who wants to become a strictly
 WISP.  Any suggestions on hardware options especially  antennas. Happy
 helpings
 --
 JIMI ATOKI
 THE REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS NETWORK
 LOAN OFFICER/REAL ESTATE CONSULTANT
 866-937-4776 EXT 706
 CELL (631)-664-3931
 www.thersn.com
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--
JIMI ATOKI
THE REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS NETWORK
LOAN OFFICER/REAL ESTATE CONSULTANT
866-937-4776 EXT 706
CELL (631)-664-3931
www.thersn.com
--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

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