Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Tom DeReggi

Tim,

I agree, there is risk of not getting covered, if full disclosure is not 
given. That is something that the WISP should consider in advance. (But 
doesn't mean it won't be covered, as they'd need to prove that having the 
bucket was something both parties typical would think relevant to disclose. 
The insurance company wrote the contract and it would be their 
responsibility to bring up the things that should or should not be 
disclosed. I'd not suggest a WISP lie, if there was a question or text 
referencing wether there was or wasn't a bucket, as that would guarantee not 
getting covered.)   But I think it is also relavent, what a WISPs intent is 
for use of the truck and bucket.  Someone that wants a bucket truck, but 
only plans to use it once a month for the tough job, should not have to 
pay the same high rate, as say a Lineman that may use the bucket all day / 
every day around high voltage lines.  Very few insurance companies have 
provisions for that, as they do not have a way to control what the usage 
will actually end up being.  This means a WISP then needs to make cost 
versus risk assesments, on what they want to do. I'd also argue, that it 
would be rare for me to ever justify making an insurance claim, based on the 
risk of loosing the insurance or no longer being able to afford it, after 
making the claime.  (except for extreme cases like someone falling and 
breaking their neck).  If the owner or a supervisor are the only ones that 
will be using the bucket, more care can be taken and less risk taken, than 
if the intent is for the truck to be used by all/any installers frequently. 
Some people buy insurance for compliance to do business, not necessarilly 
for the coverage itself.  Just like every other type of insurance (health, 
life, business, etc), one must waiver wether they really need insurance, or 
can afford to pay to releive the risk or not.


Quite honestly, I'd rather take a chance of not getting covered in a bucket, 
and minimize the risk of someone getting injured because they have the 
bucket, than have the installer taking risks on a dangerous ladder all day 
long.  I'm not downplaying the risk involved for a bucket truck, I'm jsut 
saying that Ladders are dangerous to, expecially for single man crew.  I 
know about more personal injury suits in the trades, via falling off 
ladders, than any other cause.


Its not that I don't believe in insurance, or in doing it legitimately. Its 
just that if a WISP is not careful, there insurance policy costs can put 
them out of business, just having an uninsured injury.  For example, many 
amusement companies go out of business because they can't afford the 
insurance and can't jsutify takingthe risk without it.  I'd hate to see the 
same thing destroy wireless companies.


I prefer to handle the issue from the other side... Inforce strong safety 
policies and safety awareness education.  The safety training is much less 
expensive than the insurance and paying claims. Not that that negates the 
need for insurance, but it will keep the rates down, if WISPs as an industry 
don't put themselves in the position to be claim happy.


For the record, I personally do not have a bucket truck yet.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Tim Wolfe [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 8:13 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.



Tom DeReggi wrote:

If its a standard VAN / Truck body, Don't tell them about the bucket!
Call it a VAN, not a Bucket truck!

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


As an insurance agent for the last 16 years in the state of PA(Besides 
running a WISP too for the last 5 years), I can tell You that there are 
some negatives to just Not mentioning the fact that it has a bucket on 
it. The first one is that when You sign the insurance application(This 
info. only applies to the state of PA where I am licensed, keep in mind 
the every state has different insurance laws, but almost ALL of them 
adopted the laws from the state of NY, as they were one of the first to 
actually clamp down and adopt them, and this is what PA uses), there is a 
paragraph that says all of the information You have submitted to the 
insurance CO is correct and You then sign underneath it. It is a great 
possibility that by omitting the fact that Your van had a bucket on it, 
the CO could deny Your claim based on the fact that You chose to omit the 
information about the bucket on purpose, as You knew this would stop You 
from securing coverage?. While I do understand that securing the proper 
insurance is becoming expensive, maybe even out of hand?, I do not want to 
see You or any other small CO lose everything buy trying to cut corners 
and get around something by being dishonest?. Almost all insurance have 
something called Good faith 

Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Peter R.
Borders on Insurance fraud... and if you have to activate the insurance, 
they don't have to pay...


Tom DeReggi wrote:


If its a standard VAN / Truck body, Don't tell them about the bucket!
Call it a VAN, not a Bucket truck!

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


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Re: [WISPA] Re: Anyone using Exalt radios????

2006-11-16 Thread Tom DeReggi

In order for us
to keep ahead of the LECs and cable companies we need better products not
cheaper ones.


Well said, but can't we have our cake and eat it to?

How about Better radios, Cheaper :-)

High priced vendors don;t have high prices because their costs are higher.
They have higher prices because they feel the market will pay higher prices 
based on the benefit of the product.
When it becomes beautiful for buyers is when their is enough competition and 
varietty of high quality gear, that it starts getting sold based on the cost 
to produce instead.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Brad Belton [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: 'WISPA General List' wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 7:55 PM
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Re: Anyone using Exalt radios


Hello Tom,

Well, that's the point we're trying to make here as to why not all radios
are equal.  Achieving advertised payloads 24x7 and not up to or best
effort regardless of the environment (for the most part) is where the line
is drawn.

Good example is a TeraBridge 5x45 PtP radio set that costs between $8k -
$15k depending on antennas, volume pricing etc.  This is a radio that
produces 45Mbps FDX period.  No auto-rating, no ARQ, no ifs, no ands or
buts.  That's 90Mbps aggregate using only two 16Mhz wide channels.  This
radio was originally designed and built probably long before Trango even
existed and has changed brand names no less than four times during its life.
As the saying goes; They just don't make 'em like that anymore!  lol

Of course that doesn't mean the radio is immune to interference, but as long
as you have enough gain over and above the noise floor they produce 45Mbps
FDX.  We have several pairs running in arguably one of the noisiest
environments in the nation.  In two separate cases we tried the Atlas at
either side of a TeraBridge and the Atlas just couldn't cut the mustard.
The Atlas is truly a toy in comparison to the TeraBridge.

Back to the point of this thread...the Exalt radios look promising.  I hope
we see more products like the TeraBridge and Exalt radios.  In order for us
to keep ahead of the LECs and cable companies we need better products not
cheaper ones.

Best,


Brad



-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Tom DeReggi
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 5:57 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Re: Anyone using Exalt radios

Brad,

I recognize your points and don't deny them. But I get what I get where I
get it.
What I've been finding is that similar expereince is received with other
products.(Meaning they don't always get their speed either).
Most of my Atlas Links (above 10 miles) are not running at top modulation,
they usually operating optimally (no packet loss and low latency) at the
36mbps modulation level, which pushes real data of significantly less, I
forget the exact speeds with IPerf, but it was real close to 30 mbps. I
don't have a single Atlas running slower than that in service.

But on shorter links, we've gotten full modulation and full speed (45mbps)
out of the Atlas.  I believe I did post some speed results on the list over
the summer.
But you are right you can't get it in a very noisy environment, if you have
to get the TX and RX power to high. But its not really a distance limit, its

a delicate balancing act to get everything just right. (RX signal not to
high, TX power not to high, RSSI 20db above noise floor ). Its all
controlled by using the right antenna.

The Atlas also makes a GREAT 5.3-54 backhaul, for links under 5-7 miles.
When it operates at the low power, it runs much cleaner.

PS. recognize that my first post, I did not catch that the Exalts were FDX.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Brad Belton [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: 'WISPA General List' wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 10:47 AM
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Re: Anyone using Exalt radios


Hello Tom,

Yes auto-rate was off and ARQ was on.  We tried every combination possible
at the direction of Trango.

While I agree my experiences with Atlas may be on the worse side of the
scale I know many operators that have had the same poor experiences with
Atlas as we have.  I would venture to guess you are one of very few that has
seen 45Mbps out of an Atlas.  Just to clarify; we are talking about payload,
right?

Yes, antenna upgrades are common place with us.  Gabriel, RadioWaves and MTi
are our antennas of choice.  You should know that more than anyone as I was
one if not the biggest proponent of better antennas as it relates to Trango!

45Mbps HDX out of an Atlas, eh?  Sure would like to see some proof of
that...screenshot perhaps?  Certainly you're not going to claim an Atlas can
produce 45Mbps FDX as well are you?  After all, FDX is what this topic is
all about.

Best,


Brad


-Original 

Re: [WISPA] 750feet FSO

2006-11-16 Thread Mario Pommier
No, but I will, first thing today ... I was actually looking for that 
link since I remember a few posts related to cablefreesolutions several 
months ago.

Thanks a lot.

Mario

Brad Belton wrote:


Have you spoken with Stephen Patrick at www.cablefreesolutions.com yet?

Best,


Brad


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Mario Pommier
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 5:09 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] 750feet FSO

Can anyone say if you've successfully installed Free Space Optics at 
~750feet?
A customer seeking to expand mentioned this company: 
http://www.mrv.com/products/line/terescope.php

I've never heard that FSO actually performs reliably.
Thanks.

Mario




 






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RE: [WISPA] star os/sr2----mikrotik/cm9

2006-11-16 Thread Dennis Burgess - 2K Wireless
Differrance between a SR2 and CM9.  the CM9 is better at receiving, more
sensitive I belive, not to mention, its not yelling all the time.  CM9s are
a staple, when you don't have trees.  Try dropping the power output on your
SR2, maybe you can find a happy medium.  Have you tried replacing the SR2,
we had just replaced two, we were getting -80s on a small backhaul, MT to
MT, and after we swapped the radio, we were back at -60 .. Why, got me! 

Dennis Burgess, MCP, CCNA, A+, N+, Mikrotik Certified
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.2kwireless.com
 
2K Wireless provides high-speed internet access, along with network
consulting for WISPs, and business's with a focus on TCP/IP networking,
security, and Mikrotik routers.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Brian Rohrbacher
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 10:05 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] star os/sr2mikrotik/cm9

When I use sr2 my ack timing is all over the place, like 300 and the 
links are crap.  I drop in a cm9 and all the ack's fall to 30's where 
they should be.  This is all on MT.

Brian

Blair Davis wrote:

 The cm9 is rated for 17db

 The sr2 is rated for about 26db

 we are happy with the sr2, sr5 and sr9.   all deployed and work well

 Brian Rohrbacher wrote:

 I replaced a star os/sr2 with a mikrotik/cm9 setup on an omni.  I 
 thought it would help my noise issues to get rid of the amped up 
 sr2.  It may have helped a little but now I have signal that I think 
 it quite a bit less at the clients.  What level of power is the cm9 
 at by default in a mikrotik and if I switch it to manual what could I 
 push it to?

 Brian



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Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Brian Rohrbacher
A guy that was helping me out crashed my install truck a month or two 
ago.  He didn't see a stop sign.  He t-boned an old couple in their 
mid-late 70s.  The woman more than had enough injuries to qualify for 
the 100K personal liability/personal disability (PL/PD) I had on the 
plan.  But wait..My truck didn't have commercial insurance.  It 
wasn't even in my name or company name, but I owned the truck.  Anyway, 
the way my lawyer explains it, that 100K coverage it almost automatic 
for when someone gets hurt.  (they also said that within hours after the 
accident report was filed the insurance lawyers would be all over this 
couple offering to take the case)  Anyway, all the couple has to do is 
ask (sue) for the 100K and it is theirs.  We'll see how it plays out.  I 
hope my coverage wouldn't be denied if they decide to walk to the lotto 
store and cash in the winning ticket (as my lawyer put it).


I have since switched to my own commercial policy, but there is one 
thing that really ticks me off.  the commercial policy is CHEAPER!  That 
is insane.  I pay every 6 months.  It was like $400 and now it's $350, 
even though I got a speeding ticket 2 months ago.  He says he clocked me 
at 35 in a 25, but I was in manual 3rd gear and you can feel those 
RPMs.  I looked down and saw 28.  I was pissed I went right home stuck 
the gps on the roof and drove.  I had 9 satellites and my speedo was 
dead nutz.  Anyway, because the wreck was my truck I got an at fault on 
my record, but so did my helper along with a failure to stop and the 
automatic 3 points for causing a wreck.  I went from a clean record 
single driver on regular insurance to a commercial policy with 2 drivers 
and a combination of 2 tickets, 2 at faults, and 7 points...and I saved 
$50.  WHERE YOU AT NOW GECKO!


The moral of the story is if you are not on commercial insurance you 
need to go get yourself a few tickets and switch.  You will be better 
protected and have cheaper rates.


Brian

Tom DeReggi wrote:


Tim,

I agree, there is risk of not getting covered, if full disclosure is 
not given. That is something that the WISP should consider in advance. 
(But doesn't mean it won't be covered, as they'd need to prove that 
having the bucket was something both parties typical would think 
relevant to disclose. The insurance company wrote the contract and it 
would be their responsibility to bring up the things that should or 
should not be disclosed. I'd not suggest a WISP lie, if there was a 
question or text referencing wether there was or wasn't a bucket, as 
that would guarantee not getting covered.)   But I think it is also 
relavent, what a WISPs intent is for use of the truck and bucket.  
Someone that wants a bucket truck, but only plans to use it once a 
month for the tough job, should not have to pay the same high rate, 
as say a Lineman that may use the bucket all day / every day around 
high voltage lines.  Very few insurance companies have provisions for 
that, as they do not have a way to control what the usage will 
actually end up being.  This means a WISP then needs to make cost 
versus risk assesments, on what they want to do. I'd also argue, that 
it would be rare for me to ever justify making an insurance claim, 
based on the risk of loosing the insurance or no longer being able to 
afford it, after making the claime.  (except for extreme cases like 
someone falling and breaking their neck).  If the owner or a 
supervisor are the only ones that will be using the bucket, more care 
can be taken and less risk taken, than if the intent is for the truck 
to be used by all/any installers frequently. Some people buy insurance 
for compliance to do business, not necessarilly for the coverage 
itself.  Just like every other type of insurance (health, life, 
business, etc), one must waiver wether they really need insurance, or 
can afford to pay to releive the risk or not.


Quite honestly, I'd rather take a chance of not getting covered in a 
bucket, and minimize the risk of someone getting injured because they 
have the bucket, than have the installer taking risks on a dangerous 
ladder all day long.  I'm not downplaying the risk involved for a 
bucket truck, I'm jsut saying that Ladders are dangerous to, 
expecially for single man crew.  I know about more personal injury 
suits in the trades, via falling off ladders, than any other cause.


Its not that I don't believe in insurance, or in doing it 
legitimately. Its just that if a WISP is not careful, there insurance 
policy costs can put them out of business, just having an uninsured 
injury.  For example, many amusement companies go out of business 
because they can't afford the insurance and can't jsutify takingthe 
risk without it.  I'd hate to see the same thing destroy wireless 
companies.


I prefer to handle the issue from the other side... Inforce strong 
safety policies and safety awareness education.  The safety training 
is much less expensive than the 

Re: [WISPA] 750feet FSO

2006-11-16 Thread chipps
Sure. It is Peter Schoon at systemsupportsolutions.com based in Minnesota.

al Message-
From: John Scrivner [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 12:05 AM
To: 'WISPA General List'
Subject: Re: [WISPA] 750feet FSO

This is a neutral place so feel free to share the guy you know so we all 
know who it is. If you have a vested interest then just say so and we 
will all pummel you for being a spammer! :-) jk Please do share 
who you know that can help.
Thanks,
Scriv


Ken Chipps wrote:

FSO is rock solid up to 500 meters or so, and very reliable in most cases up
to a kilometer. If you need a vendor to help you with this, let me know. I
know an excellent, very experienced person in this business.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Mario Pommier
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 5:09 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] 750feet FSO

Can anyone say if you've successfully installed Free Space Optics at 
~750feet?
A customer seeking to expand mentioned this company: 
http://www.mrv.com/products/line/terescope.php
I've never heard that FSO actually performs reliably.
Thanks.

Mario




 

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RE: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs. And Worker's Comp...

2006-11-16 Thread Dylan Bouterse
How are you handling worker's comp for the people authorized to use the
truck?

Dylan

 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
On
 Behalf Of cw
 Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 9:10 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for
 installs.
 
 You might have your agent try Progressive. Ours is listed as a
 ladder/bucket
 truck and they never said that was a problem. It's $2200/yr with
collision
 and a million liability. Seems expensive to me but Florida insurance
rates
 are just that way. - cw
 
 Dylan Bouterse wrote:
  I'd like to hear (on or off list) how other ISPs are handling the
  insurance demands of owning/operating a lift or bucket truck. Our
  insurance company has refused to insure a bucket truck or lift
because
  of the operating height above ground level. How are other companies
  getting insured or are you outsourcing jobs that require lift work?
 
  Dylan

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[WISPA] Old News -- but can someone patent a mesh network

2006-11-16 Thread Charles Wu
http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/view_press_release.php?rID=9156

Their patent reads as follows

US Patent No 6,249,516 B1

WIRELESS NETWORK GATEAWY AND METHOD FOR PROVIDING SAME

A wireless network system includes a server having a server controller and a
server radio modem, and a number of clients each including a client
controller and a client radio modem.  The server controller implements a
server process that includes the receipt and the transmission of data
packets via the radio modem.  The client controllers of each of the clients
implements a client process that includes the receipt and transmission of
data packets via the client radio modem.  The client process of each of the
clients intiates, selects, and maintains a radio transmission path to the
server that is either a direct path to the server, or is an indirect path or
link to the server through at least one of the remainder of the clients.
A method for providing wireless network communication includes providing a
server imeplementing a server process including receiving data packets via a
radio modem, sending data packets via the server radio modem, communicating
with the network, and performing housekeeping functions, and further
includes providing a number of clients, each implementing a client process
sending and receiving data packets via a client radio modem, maintaining a
send/receive data buffer, and selecting a radio transmission path to the
server.  The radio transmission path or link is either a direct path to
the server, or an indirect path to the server through at least one of the
remainder of the clients.  The process preferably optimizes the link to
minimize the number of hops to the server.

I'm not a lawyer, but this seems a bit ridiculous to me...

Thoughts?

-Charles


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Re: [WISPA] External battery on UPS

2006-11-16 Thread Mark Nash - Lists
I replaced the two internal batteries last night with two external, $100
batteries, and put a load on the UPS that matched the highest load I have
out in the field (80w).  It took 2 Tranzeo APs, an Xpeed SDSL modem, and a
19 TV on the QVC to load it up properly.  Now instead of 1 hour I get 13
hours.  Bigger, better batteries should net me more time than this.  My goal
is bang for buck at this stage in my business...more run time for a sensible
price.

One cool thing about this setup is that I can rig it up to be able to simply
take new batteries out to a site when they are getting low, instead of the
generator.  I can keep some spare batteries charged up and ready to go.
It's a whole lot cheaper and easier than purchasing multiple QUALITY 1000w
generators and putting large custom tanks on them.  That is if your UPS is
not on the top of a water tower or something. ;)

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax

- Original Message - 
From: Brian Rohrbacher [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] External battery on UPS


 I'm pasting Gino's link to the right thread.
 Then I can search me email in a year and find the correct thread

 Connectors:

 http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=263-110

 Batteries:

 http://www.donrowe.com/batteries/8a31dt.html



 Brian Rohrbacher wrote:

  Can we get some links to these batteries that work well?
  Gino,
  Got a link to the DC block connectors you were talking about?
 
  Brian
 
 
  Travis Johnson wrote:
 
  Hi,
 
  We run two 4 gauge power wires out the front of the case, connect the
  positive to a 60A fuse, and then to the batteries.
 
  We are using AGM type (same thing used in UPS systems) big batteries
  (a little bigger than a car battery, but each battery is 110 pounds).
  We wire them in series (to get 24VDC).
 
  This setup has only been installed for 12-18 months at various
  locations, so I don't have an estimate on battery life.
 
  Travis
  Microserv
 
  Brian Rohrbacher wrote:
 
  You got any pics of this or similar Travisanyone?
 
  Travis,
  What APC do you use and what batteries are added?  What do you draw
  and what is th run time?  Do you know how many times the one with
  the most cycles has been drawn down?  How long do the batteries last?
 
  Brian
 
  Travis Johnson wrote:
 
  You can't use just 1 battery. The APC units want to see 24vdc, so
  you need two batteries running in series.
 
  It works perfectly, as I have 20+ remote locations running off two
  gel type batteries. Make sure you install some type of a fuse on
  the positive side of the connection.
 
  Travis
  Microserv
 
  Mark Nash - Lists wrote:
 
  I believe I remember some discussion on this list on connecting an
  external battery to an APC UPS.  I'm in the middle of doing it
  right now and am having problems.  The UPS just beep continuously
  with the 'bad battery' light on.  I'm using a Lifeline deep cycle
  battery.  Any ideas?
 
  Mark Nash
  Network Engineer
  UnwiredOnline.Net
  350 Holly Street
  Junction City, OR 97448
  http://www.uwol.net
  541-998-
  541-998-5599 fax
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] Insurance And Worker's Comp...

2006-11-16 Thread Peter R.

I would suggest hiring through an ASO or PEO organization.
These staff companies provide payroll, benefits and insurance.
Construction companies use them.

Just a thought.

Regards,

Peter Radizeski
RAD-INFO, Inc.
MarketingIDEAguy.com
(813) (63-5884
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Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Tim Wolfe
Tom, I do share some of same views that You have. I just thought it 
would be a good idea to present the pros and cons of omitting 
information. There are 2 types of insurance customers it seems?. The 
first one is like Yourself. You buy the insurance because You have to, 
and the thought of using it doesn't really cross Your mind for all the 
reasons You mentioned below. If it were possible, I am sure that 
insurance CO's would love to find a way to discern the quality customers 
from the irresponsible ones, and charge lower rates based on this fact, 
and the fact that the bucket is only used once a month?. That sad part 
is there is no real way to do this, as insurance is based on the law of 
large #'s, and in order for it to work, everyone must be lumped together 
in one big pool(for lack of other words?). Your customer profile is 
fairly common though. I respect the fact that when the truck is in the 
field, only responsible operators like Yourself will be operating the 
bucket, being extra cautious as to whats going on around You and whats 
happening when the boom is moving etc. This is the way it should be at 
all times. Now lets move on to the second type of customer(The most 
uncommon, believe it or not?). This person usually does everything they 
can to cut corners, not only with work ethics and install qualities but 
also with their level of responsibilties in the day to day operation of 
their business. This customer will hire the cheapest employee that will 
work for them, skimp on safety and vehicle maintainence,  owe $$ to most 
of the vendors he or she does business with and they will usually try 
and call their employees Sub-contractors, trying to avoid paying taxes 
and workmans compensation to make more $$(This is really an entirely 
different topic, but I am just using this as an example?). This risk 
taking carries over to things such as the safe use of a bucket truck. If 
You remember, I mentioned that the people that work for this person are 
really only there because they can not find a job anywhere else, and our 
business owner in question hires them because it is cheap labor. The day 
comes when the bucket truck is needed for an install, and our employee 
gets behind the wheel to do the job(Keep in mind that our employee was 
up half the night boozing with his/her friends, and just found it their 
spouse is messing with the neighbor). When at the job site, this 
employee will not have very good safety principles, and will do 
something really dumb like tear the service head for the electric off 
the wall of the house and tear down the cable CO's fiber line, along 
with the local Telco's phone systems. The reason I am mentioning all 
this is because for the most part, 10% of all insurance customers file 
90% of the claims for reasons mentioned above. This same customer will 
also use their insurance policy as a maintainence contract, and try to 
get the insurance CO to pay for things that You or I would simply say, 
OK, this happened, but I will just fix it myself, as it was my fault in 
the first place.  I dropped a 4ft piece of pipe off of the roof last 
year and it hit the only car parked on the entire street. It was an 
older car that already had 4000 dents and peeling paint, but the damage 
to the fender was $430. I just paid it, because it was stupidity in the 
first place, and I didn't want my rates to go up?. Now, the other side 
of this: We have an incidence where an individual needed new tires for 
inspection, so using their really smart brain, they drove it home from 
the mechanic that failed it, and slashed all the tires themselves. The 
insurance CO only paid the prorated amount, as the tires were worn out 
in the first place, so this enterprising individual got pissed, and went 
and got a set of tires(That didn't match) from the local junk yard that 
had been slashed in a previous crime, had them mounted on the rims for 
the van, and then tried to claim a 2nd time that his tires had been 
vandalized again. I guess You all figured out that this moron is now in 
jail for insurance fraud?(For every one that is caught, 10 get away with it)
The reason I am mentioning all of this is that I am trying to show all 
of You why and how Your insurance rates have been steadily rising over 
the last few years. The bad thing is that even though I am an agent, I 
still pay the same rates that everyone else pays. I also do not have a 
bucket truck, as I find them useless for over 99% of all the installs I 
do(I am sure there are some of us who would be lost without one?), and I 
can not justify the costs for a device that will sit around most of the 
time. Keep in mind that no matter who operates that bucket truck, and 
how careful they are, it only takes a split second for something bad to 
happen, and if that claim is not insured (Or the CO denys it) and it is 
a large loss, The person without the needed coverage will be the one 
getting screwed. It really could mean the difference 

Re: [WISPA] Old News -- but can someone patent a mesh network

2006-11-16 Thread Rich Comroe
The patent you cite was filed Jan 27, 2000.  In general, to challenge a 
patent you'd have to find publicly available description (publication), 
prior patent, or public offer of the technology for sale pre-dating the 
patent's filing date.  The patent office has already searched prior patents 
and found none prior to Jan 27 2000.If you can, there's some attorney's 
that'd very much like to know what you know.  But just being familiar with 
Mesh for the last-almost-7-years doesn't count.  Not knowing that some 
technology may be subject to Intellectual Property Right does not make it 
free.  The most well known case of this is GIF image encoding.  This was 
used freely on the web, literally for years, before the IPR holder chose to 
begin asserting their claim (it was apparently years before the IPR holder 
even knew that they actually held IPR!! ... typical big company syndrome 
IIRC).


Rich


- Original Message - 
From: Charles Wu [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: 'WISPA General List' wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 9:06 AM
Subject: [WISPA] Old News -- but can someone patent a mesh network


http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/view_press_release.php?rID=9156

Their patent reads as follows

US Patent No 6,249,516 B1

WIRELESS NETWORK GATEAWY AND METHOD FOR PROVIDING SAME

A wireless network system includes a server having a server controller and a
server radio modem, and a number of clients each including a client
controller and a client radio modem.  The server controller implements a
server process that includes the receipt and the transmission of data
packets via the radio modem.  The client controllers of each of the clients
implements a client process that includes the receipt and transmission of
data packets via the client radio modem.  The client process of each of the
clients intiates, selects, and maintains a radio transmission path to the
server that is either a direct path to the server, or is an indirect path or
link to the server through at least one of the remainder of the clients.
A method for providing wireless network communication includes providing a
server imeplementing a server process including receiving data packets via a
radio modem, sending data packets via the server radio modem, communicating
with the network, and performing housekeeping functions, and further
includes providing a number of clients, each implementing a client process
sending and receiving data packets via a client radio modem, maintaining a
send/receive data buffer, and selecting a radio transmission path to the
server.  The radio transmission path or link is either a direct path to
the server, or an indirect path to the server through at least one of the
remainder of the clients.  The process preferably optimizes the link to
minimize the number of hops to the server.

I'm not a lawyer, but this seems a bit ridiculous to me...

Thoughts?

-Charles


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[WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread Mark Nash - Lists
Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will they
physically fit?  How do you like them?

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax


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RE: [WISPA] Re: Anyone using Exalt radios????

2006-11-16 Thread Charles Wu
So is it safe to say that one could get one of those $9k Dragon Wave links
licensed and ready to go for $12.5 - $15k?

It really depends on dish size and licensing situation

For example, licensing for a government entity (county, school, etc) is on a
different schedule (costs about $1k) vs. licensing for a common carrier
(WISP, Telco, etc)

Also, w/ multiple links, things can change

It gets complicated, but I can explain further if you want

-Charles

---
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Coming to a City Near You
http://www.winog.com 

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[WISPA] wifi with sync

2006-11-16 Thread Gino A. Villarini
Just got a confirmation from Jeff Beasley @ Wireless Interactive, that the
Apollo series of wifi radios support sync via a 3 cable serial interface...

Interesting...
 
Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145


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Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread Leon D. Zetekoff, NCE

Mark Nash - Lists wrote:

Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will they
physically fit?  How do you like them?
  
We're using them and they seem to work ok. Having the right antenna is a 
key too.


leon

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax


  
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RE: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread Dennis Burgess - 2K Wireless
I have two SR9s on 112s, you can use them for customer radios.  There is
some 900mhz rootenna's out now too.



Dennis Burgess, MCP, CCNA, A+, N+, Mikrotik Certified
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.2kwireless.com
 
2K Wireless provides high-speed internet access, along with network
consulting for WISPs, and business's with a focus on TCP/IP networking,
security, and Mikrotik routers.
-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Mark Nash - Lists
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 12:01 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will they
physically fit?  How do you like them?

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax


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Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread Mark Nash - Lists
What antenna are you using?

Anyone used the 900MHz Rootenna?

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax

- Original Message - 
From: Leon D. Zetekoff, NCE [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9


 Mark Nash - Lists wrote:
  Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will
they
  physically fit?  How do you like them?
 
 We're using them and they seem to work ok. Having the right antenna is a
 key too.

 leon
  Mark Nash
  Network Engineer
  UnwiredOnline.Net
  350 Holly Street
  Junction City, OR 97448
  http://www.uwol.net
  541-998-
  541-998-5599 fax
 
 
 







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[WISPA] Shopping for the 18-19 dbi rootenna

2006-11-16 Thread Forbes Mercy
I need dependable suppliers of Rotennas that I can get every week, we order 
about 40-50 a month our average price paid is $40 and the best ones for us are 
where they have a cat 5 connector and pre-designed for the entire Engenius CB3 
bridges with case not removed.

We buy them now but the supplier is not dependable on a weekly basis.

Thank you,
Forbes Mercy
President - Washington Broadband, Inc.
 

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[WISPA] ATT Muni Wireless

2006-11-16 Thread Peter R.

http://radinfo.blogspot.com/2006/11/att-ma-hypocrisy.html

--


Regards,

Peter Radizeski
RAD-INFO, Inc. - NSP Strategist
We Help ISPs Connect  Communicate
813.963.5884 
http://4isps.com/newsletter.htm



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RE: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread Dennis Burgess - 2K Wireless
We have some pac antennas and another one, ca'nt think of what they were, we
have not deployed 900mhz rootennas.

Dennis Burgess, MCP, CCNA, A+, N+, Mikrotik Certified
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.2kwireless.com
 
2K Wireless provides high-speed internet access, along with network
consulting for WISPs, and business's with a focus on TCP/IP networking,
security, and Mikrotik routers.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Mark Nash - Lists
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 2:07 PM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

What antenna are you using?

Anyone used the 900MHz Rootenna?

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax

- Original Message - 
From: Leon D. Zetekoff, NCE [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9


 Mark Nash - Lists wrote:
  Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will
they
  physically fit?  How do you like them?
 
 We're using them and they seem to work ok. Having the right antenna is a
 key too.

 leon
  Mark Nash
  Network Engineer
  UnwiredOnline.Net
  350 Holly Street
  Junction City, OR 97448
  http://www.uwol.net
  541-998-
  541-998-5599 fax
 
 
 







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Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Tom DeReggi
When you put it that way... It does bring a new perpective to think 
about. Well said.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Tim Wolfe [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:54 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.


Tom, I do share some of same views that You have. I just thought it would 
be a good idea to present the pros and cons of omitting information. 
There are 2 types of insurance customers it seems?. The first one is like 
Yourself. You buy the insurance because You have to, and the thought of 
using it doesn't really cross Your mind for all the reasons You mentioned 
below. If it were possible, I am sure that insurance CO's would love to 
find a way to discern the quality customers from the irresponsible ones, 
and charge lower rates based on this fact, and the fact that the bucket is 
only used once a month?. That sad part is there is no real way to do this, 
as insurance is based on the law of large #'s, and in order for it to 
work, everyone must be lumped together in one big pool(for lack of other 
words?). Your customer profile is fairly common though. I respect the fact 
that when the truck is in the field, only responsible operators like 
Yourself will be operating the bucket, being extra cautious as to whats 
going on around You and whats happening when the boom is moving etc. This 
is the way it should be at all times. Now lets move on to the second type 
of customer(The most uncommon, believe it or not?). This person usually 
does everything they can to cut corners, not only with work ethics and 
install qualities but also with their level of responsibilties in the day 
to day operation of their business. This customer will hire the cheapest 
employee that will work for them, skimp on safety and vehicle 
maintainence,  owe $$ to most of the vendors he or she does business with 
and they will usually try and call their employees Sub-contractors, 
trying to avoid paying taxes and workmans compensation to make more 
$$(This is really an entirely different topic, but I am just using this as 
an example?). This risk taking carries over to things such as the safe use 
of a bucket truck. If You remember, I mentioned that the people that work 
for this person are really only there because they can not find a job 
anywhere else, and our business owner in question hires them because it is 
cheap labor. The day comes when the bucket truck is needed for an install, 
and our employee gets behind the wheel to do the job(Keep in mind that our 
employee was up half the night boozing with his/her friends, and just 
found it their spouse is messing with the neighbor). When at the job site, 
this employee will not have very good safety principles, and will do 
something really dumb like tear the service head for the electric off the 
wall of the house and tear down the cable CO's fiber line, along with the 
local Telco's phone systems. The reason I am mentioning all this is 
because for the most part, 10% of all insurance customers file 90% of the 
claims for reasons mentioned above. This same customer will also use their 
insurance policy as a maintainence contract, and try to get the insurance 
CO to pay for things that You or I would simply say, OK, this happened, 
but I will just fix it myself, as it was my fault in the first place.  I 
dropped a 4ft piece of pipe off of the roof last year and it hit the only 
car parked on the entire street. It was an older car that already had 4000 
dents and peeling paint, but the damage to the fender was $430. I just 
paid it, because it was stupidity in the first place, and I didn't want my 
rates to go up?. Now, the other side of this: We have an incidence where 
an individual needed new tires for inspection, so using their really smart 
brain, they drove it home from the mechanic that failed it, and slashed 
all the tires themselves. The insurance CO only paid the prorated amount, 
as the tires were worn out in the first place, so this enterprising 
individual got pissed, and went and got a set of tires(That didn't match) 
from the local junk yard that had been slashed in a previous crime, had 
them mounted on the rims for the van, and then tried to claim a 2nd time 
that his tires had been vandalized again. I guess You all figured out that 
this moron is now in jail for insurance fraud?(For every one that is 
caught, 10 get away with it)
The reason I am mentioning all of this is that I am trying to show all of 
You why and how Your insurance rates have been steadily rising over the 
last few years. The bad thing is that even though I am an agent, I still 
pay the same rates that everyone else pays. I also do not have a bucket 
truck, as I find them useless for over 99% of all the installs I do(I am 
sure there are some of us who would be lost without one?), and I can not 
justify 

Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Travis Johnson

Hi,

There are several other factors to consider here insurance on the 
vehicle itself is to cover if you damage someone else's property 
(vehicle) by getting into an accident on the road. You may also have 
full-coverage insurance to pay to fix the bucket truck itself.


However, the other issue is general liability insurance... if you have 
someone in the bucket and they go thru someone's roof because they 
aren't paying attention, wouldn't that be covered by your general 
liability policy, rather than the auto insurance policy?


Travis
Microserv

P.S. In almost 10 years in the wireless business, and well over 
1,000,000 miles logged on over 20 wireless vehicles during that time 
(including several bucket trucks), we have never had an insurance 
claim...  yet my rates continue to go up every year... :(


Tom DeReggi wrote:
When you put it that way... It does bring a new perpective to 
think about. Well said.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - From: Tim Wolfe [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:54 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for 
installs.



Tom, I do share some of same views that You have. I just thought it 
would be a good idea to present the pros and cons of omitting 
information. There are 2 types of insurance customers it seems?. The 
first one is like Yourself. You buy the insurance because You have 
to, and the thought of using it doesn't really cross Your mind for 
all the reasons You mentioned below. If it were possible, I am sure 
that insurance CO's would love to find a way to discern the quality 
customers from the irresponsible ones, and charge lower rates based 
on this fact, and the fact that the bucket is only used once a 
month?. That sad part is there is no real way to do this, as 
insurance is based on the law of large #'s, and in order for it to 
work, everyone must be lumped together in one big pool(for lack of 
other words?). Your customer profile is fairly common though. I 
respect the fact that when the truck is in the field, only 
responsible operators like Yourself will be operating the bucket, 
being extra cautious as to whats going on around You and whats 
happening when the boom is moving etc. This is the way it should be 
at all times. Now lets move on to the second type of customer(The 
most uncommon, believe it or not?). This person usually does 
everything they can to cut corners, not only with work ethics and 
install qualities but also with their level of responsibilties in the 
day to day operation of their business. This customer will hire the 
cheapest employee that will work for them, skimp on safety and 
vehicle maintainence,  owe $$ to most of the vendors he or she does 
business with and they will usually try and call their employees 
Sub-contractors, trying to avoid paying taxes and workmans 
compensation to make more $$(This is really an entirely different 
topic, but I am just using this as an example?). This risk taking 
carries over to things such as the safe use of a bucket truck. If You 
remember, I mentioned that the people that work for this person are 
really only there because they can not find a job anywhere else, and 
our business owner in question hires them because it is cheap labor. 
The day comes when the bucket truck is needed for an install, and our 
employee gets behind the wheel to do the job(Keep in mind that our 
employee was up half the night boozing with his/her friends, and just 
found it their spouse is messing with the neighbor). When at the job 
site, this employee will not have very good safety principles, and 
will do something really dumb like tear the service head for the 
electric off the wall of the house and tear down the cable CO's fiber 
line, along with the local Telco's phone systems. The reason I am 
mentioning all this is because for the most part, 10% of all 
insurance customers file 90% of the claims for reasons mentioned 
above. This same customer will also use their insurance policy as a 
maintainence contract, and try to get the insurance CO to pay for 
things that You or I would simply say, OK, this happened, but I will 
just fix it myself, as it was my fault in the first place.  I 
dropped a 4ft piece of pipe off of the roof last year and it hit the 
only car parked on the entire street. It was an older car that 
already had 4000 dents and peeling paint, but the damage to the 
fender was $430. I just paid it, because it was stupidity in the 
first place, and I didn't want my rates to go up?. Now, the other 
side of this: We have an incidence where an individual needed new 
tires for inspection, so using their really smart brain, they drove 
it home from the mechanic that failed it, and slashed all the tires 
themselves. The insurance CO only paid the prorated amount, as the 
tires were worn out in the first place, so this enterprising 

Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread J. Vogel
Travis brings up a good point I think. When I purchased insurance on my
bucket truck,
I specifically asked the agent about possible problems with it being a
bucket truck, and
he assured me that as far as the automotive liability insurance was
concerned, the bucket
had no effect, as any mis-haps involving the use of the bucket itself
would not fall
under automotive insurance policies. It would effect comprehensive
insurance as the
value of the truck would be increased, but my truck is old enough I just
took liability
on it.

I too think issues with the use of the bucket would more likely be
covered under
my general liability policy, unless it was a case of employee injury
(falling out of the
bucket) which would fall under workman's comp. Meanwhile, I use the
truck because
it is so much safer for me (and any employee's I might hire) than
working from a ladder.

The holder of my general business liability may well disclaim any
responsibility because
they think it should be the automotive insurer's. :)

I hope I never have to find out.

John


Travis Johnson wrote:

 Hi,

 There are several other factors to consider here insurance on the
 vehicle itself is to cover if you damage someone else's property
 (vehicle) by getting into an accident on the road. You may also have
 full-coverage insurance to pay to fix the bucket truck itself.

 However, the other issue is general liability insurance... if you have
 someone in the bucket and they go thru someone's roof because they
 aren't paying attention, wouldn't that be covered by your general
 liability policy, rather than the auto insurance policy?

 Travis
 Microserv

 P.S. In almost 10 years in the wireless business, and well over
 1,000,000 miles logged on over 20 wireless vehicles during that time
 (including several bucket trucks), we have never had an insurance
 claim...  yet my rates continue to go up every year... :(

 Tom DeReggi wrote:
 When you put it that way... It does bring a new perpective to
 think about. Well said.

 Tom DeReggi
 RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
 IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


 - Original Message - From: Tim Wolfe [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:54 AM
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for
 installs.


 Tom, I do share some of same views that You have. I just thought it
 would be a good idea to present the pros and cons of omitting
 information. There are 2 types of insurance customers it seems?. The
 first one is like Yourself. You buy the insurance because You have
 to, and the thought of using it doesn't really cross Your mind for
 all the reasons You mentioned below. If it were possible, I am sure
 that insurance CO's would love to find a way to discern the quality
 customers from the irresponsible ones, and charge lower rates based
 on this fact, and the fact that the bucket is only used once a
 month?. That sad part is there is no real way to do this, as
 insurance is based on the law of large #'s, and in order for it to
 work, everyone must be lumped together in one big pool(for lack of
 other words?). Your customer profile is fairly common though. I
 respect the fact that when the truck is in the field, only
 responsible operators like Yourself will be operating the bucket,
 being extra cautious as to whats going on around You and whats
 happening when the boom is moving etc. This is the way it should be
 at all times. Now lets move on to the second type of customer(The
 most uncommon, believe it or not?). This person usually does
 everything they can to cut corners, not only with work ethics and
 install qualities but also with their level of responsibilties in
 the day to day operation of their business. This customer will hire
 the cheapest employee that will work for them, skimp on safety and
 vehicle maintainence,  owe $$ to most of the vendors he or she does
 business with and they will usually try and call their employees
 Sub-contractors, trying to avoid paying taxes and workmans
 compensation to make more $$(This is really an entirely different
 topic, but I am just using this as an example?). This risk taking
 carries over to things such as the safe use of a bucket truck. If
 You remember, I mentioned that the people that work for this person
 are really only there because they can not find a job anywhere else,
 and our business owner in question hires them because it is cheap
 labor. The day comes when the bucket truck is needed for an install,
 and our employee gets behind the wheel to do the job(Keep in mind
 that our employee was up half the night boozing with his/her
 friends, and just found it their spouse is messing with the
 neighbor). When at the job site, this employee will not have very
 good safety principles, and will do something really dumb like tear
 the service head for the electric off the wall of the house and tear
 down the cable CO's fiber line, along with the local Telco's phone
 

Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread Leon D. Zetekoff, NCE

Mark Nash - Lists wrote:

What antenna are you using?
  

900 yagis and roos...ldz

Anyone used the 900MHz Rootenna?

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax

- Original Message - 
From: Leon D. Zetekoff, NCE [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9


  

Mark Nash - Lists wrote:


Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will
  

they
  

physically fit?  How do you like them?

  

We're using them and they seem to work ok. Having the right antenna is a
key too.

leon


Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax



  







  

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Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Tom DeReggi
I disagree with that.  Something isn't fraud, if no concious effort was made 
to hide something or deceive someone. Not being asked, is not being the same 
thing as hiding something.  If you installed a new stereo system in your 
vehichle or a new ladder rack, would you call your insurance company and 
say, PLEASE RAISE MY RATES I JUST ADDED SOME MORE EXPENSIVE ACCESSORIES TO 
MY VEHICHLE. No of course not, and not doing that does not exclude coverage 
for those items added that are newly attached to the vehichle.  If you ask 
to have a VAN covered, you are covering the VAN. If you didn't ask to have a 
bucket covered you aren't covering the bucket.  There is no fraud because 
there was never an agreement or intent from either party to cover the 
bucket.  Their was a mutual agreement to jsut cover the VAN.  Therefore if 
the VAN was in a driving colission non-related to the bucket, the fact that 
a bucket was on it is irrelevent.  Plus, the insurance company has an 
obligation to protect the other party that was hit. If not, uninsured 
motorists kicks in. The uninsured motorists covering that will then legally 
fight your insurance company to make them pay it instead, and only cover it 
themselves if lost battle.  I'd never advise someone to lie on an insurance 
application. If you are asked if it has a bucket or accessories of 
releveance, then it should be disclosed. Many agents don't ask, and not even 
sure all applications have a check box for a bucket on a VAN.  I know when I 
ask a bank to finance a VAN with a Bucket, they only appraise the vehichle 
as a VAN because Bucket isn't an accessory listed on their accessories 
to include on the VAN for acessing the value. One of the reasons I don;t 
have a VAN, because I can only get financing on Half the cost I'd pay for 
the VAN, and Blue book only considers the VAN itself.  When a CLAIM is made 
to the insurance company, asking to cover the value of the VAN, they will go 
to the Blue Book and use it to define the VAN. Do you think the insurance 
comapny will add on the value of the Bucket? No way.  You can use the 
insurance company's own standard policy of how they assess the value of the 
VAN when it would be covered, as the method to define what the VAN is.  What 
makes a Bank's definition of what a VAN is any different than what an 
insurance company defines a VAN as?


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Brad Belton [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: 'WISPA General List' wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 8:45 PM
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.


God forbid the van kills someone in a traffic accident unrelated to the
bucket all together.  The Insurance Company could and probably would deny
the claim due to a falsified application.  If an insurance company can find
a way out of a claim (especially a costly one) they will.

Best,


Brad




-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Tim Wolfe
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 7:14 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

Tom DeReggi wrote:

If its a standard VAN / Truck body, Don't tell them about the bucket!
Call it a VAN, not a Bucket truck!

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband



As an insurance agent for the last 16 years in the state of PA(Besides
running a WISP too for the last 5 years), I can tell You that there are
some negatives to just Not mentioning the fact that it has a bucket on
it. The first one is that when You sign the insurance application(This
info. only applies to the state of PA where I am licensed, keep in mind
the every state has different insurance laws, but almost ALL of them
adopted the laws from the state of NY, as they were one of the first to
actually clamp down and adopt them, and this is what PA uses), there is
a paragraph that says all of the information You have submitted to the
insurance CO is correct and You then sign underneath it. It is a great
possibility that by omitting the fact that Your van had a bucket on
it, the CO could deny Your claim based on the fact that You chose to
omit the information about the bucket on purpose, as You knew this would
stop You from securing coverage?. While I do understand that securing
the proper insurance is becoming expensive, maybe even out of hand?, I
do not want to see You or any other small CO lose everything buy trying
to cut corners and get around something by being dishonest?. Almost all
insurance have something called Good faith agreements in them. This
Good Faith agreement is based on upon the fact that both You and the
insurance CO have been up front and honest with each other about what
coverages You are receiving from the CO and what type of risk the CO is
actually insuring. They fulfill their half by giving You a policy that
specificly states what 

Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Tom DeReggi
Excellent point Travis.  It would be covered under business liabilty 
insurance and/or workman's comp.
Auto insurance is meant to cover the driver or other guy that got hurt in a 
driving accident.
Never once heard of a bucket contributing to a driving accident with another 
vehichle.


Unless of course you were driving down the road and forgot to lower the boom 
before driving away :-)


Your business liabilty insurance is also more appropriate for this, as you 
classify what type of business you are in. Using it as a lineman, home 
construction, or Computer Networking can be considered and has required 
provisions for defining that in the agreement.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Travis Johnson [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 6:03 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.



Hi,

There are several other factors to consider here insurance on the 
vehicle itself is to cover if you damage someone else's property (vehicle) 
by getting into an accident on the road. You may also have full-coverage 
insurance to pay to fix the bucket truck itself.


However, the other issue is general liability insurance... if you have 
someone in the bucket and they go thru someone's roof because they aren't 
paying attention, wouldn't that be covered by your general liability 
policy, rather than the auto insurance policy?


Travis
Microserv

P.S. In almost 10 years in the wireless business, and well over 1,000,000 
miles logged on over 20 wireless vehicles during that time (including 
several bucket trucks), we have never had an insurance claim...  yet my 
rates continue to go up every year... :(


Tom DeReggi wrote:
When you put it that way... It does bring a new perpective to think 
about. Well said.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - From: Tim Wolfe [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:54 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for 
installs.



Tom, I do share some of same views that You have. I just thought it 
would be a good idea to present the pros and cons of omitting 
information. There are 2 types of insurance customers it seems?. The 
first one is like Yourself. You buy the insurance because You have to, 
and the thought of using it doesn't really cross Your mind for all the 
reasons You mentioned below. If it were possible, I am sure that 
insurance CO's would love to find a way to discern the quality customers 
from the irresponsible ones, and charge lower rates based on this fact, 
and the fact that the bucket is only used once a month?. That sad part 
is there is no real way to do this, as insurance is based on the law of 
large #'s, and in order for it to work, everyone must be lumped together 
in one big pool(for lack of other words?). Your customer profile is 
fairly common though. I respect the fact that when the truck is in the 
field, only responsible operators like Yourself will be operating the 
bucket, being extra cautious as to whats going on around You and whats 
happening when the boom is moving etc. This is the way it should be at 
all times. Now lets move on to the second type of customer(The most 
uncommon, believe it or not?). This person usually does everything they 
can to cut corners, not only with work ethics and install qualities but 
also with their level of responsibilties in the day to day operation of 
their business. This customer will hire the cheapest employee that will 
work for them, skimp on safety and vehicle maintainence,  owe $$ to most 
of the vendors he or she does business with and they will usually try 
and call their employees Sub-contractors, trying to avoid paying taxes 
and workmans compensation to make more $$(This is really an entirely 
different topic, but I am just using this as an example?). This risk 
taking carries over to things such as the safe use of a bucket truck. If 
You remember, I mentioned that the people that work for this person are 
really only there because they can not find a job anywhere else, and our 
business owner in question hires them because it is cheap labor. The day 
comes when the bucket truck is needed for an install, and our employee 
gets behind the wheel to do the job(Keep in mind that our employee was 
up half the night boozing with his/her friends, and just found it their 
spouse is messing with the neighbor). When at the job site, this 
employee will not have very good safety principles, and will do 
something really dumb like tear the service head for the electric off 
the wall of the house and tear down the cable CO's fiber line, along 
with the local Telco's phone systems. The reason I am mentioning all 
this is because for the most part, 10% of all insurance customers file 
90% of the 

Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9

2006-11-16 Thread George Rogato

I'm just deploying Pacs 900 rootennas with sr9's.

Nice and clean.

George

Mark Nash - Lists wrote:

What antenna are you using?

Anyone used the 900MHz Rootenna?

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax

- Original Message - 
From: Leon D. Zetekoff, NCE [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Mikrotik/RB112/SR9



Mark Nash - Lists wrote:

Has anyone used the SR9's in a RB112?  They are a little bigger so will

they

physically fit?  How do you like them?


We're using them and they seem to work ok. Having the right antenna is a
key too.

leon

Mark Nash
Network Engineer
UnwiredOnline.Net
350 Holly Street
Junction City, OR 97448
http://www.uwol.net
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax











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Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for installs.

2006-11-16 Thread Tim Wolfe

Tom DeReggi wrote:
Excellent point Travis.  It would be covered under business liabilty 
insurance and/or workman's comp.
Auto insurance is meant to cover the driver or other guy that got hurt 
in a driving accident.
Never once heard of a bucket contributing to a driving accident with 
another vehichle.


Unless of course you were driving down the road and forgot to lower 
the boom before driving away :-)


Your business liabilty insurance is also more appropriate for this, as 
you classify what type of business you are in. Using it as a 
lineman, home construction, or Computer Networking can be 
considered and has required provisions for defining that in the 
agreement.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - From: Travis Johnson [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 6:03 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance for use of bucket truck or lift for 
installs.


Tom, Wrong answer about the business liability insurance :-) . In most 
states, the insurance covers ANYTHING that arises due to the vehicle or 
its use. For instance, in PA, if You close the van door on Your 
hand(even if the vehicle is parked and not moving) and break it, Your 
auto insurance has to pay the medical bills. If the operator of the 
bucket truck sends it through the roof of the house they are working on, 
then the property damage coverage of Your auto policy(primary) kicks in 
and pays for the roof. There is a chance that Your business insurance(GL 
or general liability) policy would cover You on a secondary basis if the 
coverage on the auto policy was not enough and You were sued for the 
difference?(Varies by state). The legal term for this is called the 
proximate cause of the accident or problem, and since the bucket was 
attached to the van, the auto policy will cover it. This is why Your 
insurance CO is pitching a fit about the bucket. Here is some more 
insurance trivia that all of You should be aware of, as I for one hate 
surprises. Did You know that if at the end of Your employees shift, You 
ask that person to drop off a check, contract, pick up a part at radio 
shack etc. and they are involved in an accident, You are going to be 
sued right along with Your employee and their (employee's)private auto 
insurer will more than likely deny the claim, as most personal lines 
policies do not cover any type of business use, period. The idea here is 
that the accident in question would have never occured if You had not 
asked the employee to run an errand for You. We also have some of us 
business owners that do not own any private vehicles. If everything You 
own is insured commercially?, Do Not EVER rent a vehicle unless Your 
Business auto policy has drive other car coverage, because if it 
doesn't?, You will be paying the bill for the accident, as most 
commercial auto policies only cover the vehicles listed on it, and if it 
'aint there?, It 'aint covered. :-(

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RE: [WISPA] Insurance And Worker's Comp...

2006-11-16 Thread Jonathan Schmidt
Hmmm...I don't know either but GOOGLE does a great job with
ASO and PEO
as the search parameter.
. . . j o n a t h a n

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Behalf Of Jack Unger
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2006 9:27 PM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Insurance And Worker's Comp...


I hate to admit my ignorance here but my curiosity got the best of me...

what does ASO and PEO stand for?



Peter R. wrote:

 I would suggest hiring through an ASO or PEO organization.
 These staff companies provide payroll, benefits and insurance.
 Construction companies use them.
 
 Just a thought.
 
 Regards,
 
 Peter Radizeski
 RAD-INFO, Inc.
 MarketingIDEAguy.com
 (813) (63-5884

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Author of the WISP Handbook - Deploying License-Free Wireless WANs
True Vendor-Neutral WISP Consulting-Training-Troubleshooting
Newsletters Downloadable from http://ask-wi.com/newsletters.html
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Re: [WISPA] star os/sr2----mikrotik/cm9

2006-11-16 Thread John Scrivner



I heard Eje telling folks at ISPCON that the chip that selects the 
antenna port for diversity on that module (I believe) was VERY sensitive 
to static discharge. Someone mentioned seeing about 20 db of attenuation 
when it fries. It sounds like you may have seen this first hand? Eje, if 
you are here can you confirm that this is the same module you said was 
quite susceptible to this damage? How did you say you have protected 
against this damage? I am sure it is surge / lightning protection but I 
think you mentioned a particular product that had given you good 
protection from this failure issue with these modules and was very cost 
effective. I assume Eje is on here?

Scriv


Have you tried replacing the SR2,
we had just replaced two, we were getting -80s on a small backhaul, MT to
MT, and after we swapped the radio, we were back at -60 .. Why, got me! 


Dennis Burgess, MCP, CCNA, A+, N+, Mikrotik Certified
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.2kwireless.com

2K Wireless provides high-speed internet access, along with network
consulting for WISPs, and business's with a focus on TCP/IP networking,
security, and Mikrotik routers.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Brian Rohrbacher
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 10:05 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] star os/sr2mikrotik/cm9

When I use sr2 my ack timing is all over the place, like 300 and the 
links are crap.  I drop in a cm9 and all the ack's fall to 30's where 
they should be.  This is all on MT.


Brian

Blair Davis wrote:

 


The cm9 is rated for 17db

The sr2 is rated for about 26db

we are happy with the sr2, sr5 and sr9.   all deployed and work well

Brian Rohrbacher wrote:

   

I replaced a star os/sr2 with a mikrotik/cm9 setup on an omni.  I 
thought it would help my noise issues to get rid of the amped up 
sr2.  It may have helped a little but now I have signal that I think 
it quite a bit less at the clients.  What level of power is the cm9 
at by default in a mikrotik and if I switch it to manual what could I 
push it to?


Brian
 



   


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