Re: [WISPA] Addresses - Lat long?

2007-01-23 Thread Sam Tetherow
I've had good luck with Yahoo's Maps service. You have to signup to get 
an app id. The API is really simple. Here is a modified chunk of code 
from my Dept of Health and Human Services/Google Map mashup for showing 
licensed daycare centers in a town.


#!/usr/bin/perl
use LWP::UserAgent;
use XML::Simple;
use CGI::Simple;

my $location=107 W 2nd Street, Valentine, NE 69201;
my $q=new CGI::Simple;
my $safe_loc=$q-url_encode($location);
my 
$geocode_url=http://api.local.yahoo.com/MapsService/V1/geocode?appid=$APP_IDlocation=$safe;);

my $ua=LWP::UserAgent-new;
my $response=$ua-get($geocode_url);
if ($response-is_error) {
die $response-status_line;
}
my $xml=XMLin($response-content());
print $xml-{'Result'}-{'Latitude'}, $xml-{'Result'}-{'Longitude'}\n;


Rick Smith wrote:

Anyone have a way to convert mass addresses into lat / long numbers ?

I have a spreadsheet of locations for a customer that I'd like to map in
Radio Mobile, and obviously need to do it via Lat/Long.

R

  


--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


[WISPA] Safety radios to get update

2007-01-23 Thread Dawn DiPietro

Safety radios to get update
Changes not expected to cause problems

By GAVIN LESNICK
Courier  Press staff writer 464-7449 or [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Monday, January 22, 2007

A nationwide reshuffling high-frequency radio assignments will 
ultimately require reprogramming and replacing all the radios linked to 
Vanderburgh County's Central Dispatch. But officials warn that the 
changes are still at least a year away from being implemented and the 
shift should be seamless.


The changes harken back to an April 2000 Federal Communications 
Commission report that showed interference to public safety radios in 
the 800 MHZ band from cellular telephone operators.


To eliminate that problem, officials with the FCC and Nextel, which 
operates on the spectrum, agreed to reconfigure the band. The plan calls 
for separating different portions of the spectrum for public safety 
radio systems, which are what emergency responders use, from part of the 
band that Nextel uses for cellular and mobile devices.


For Vanderburgh County, that means shifting a few frequencies on the 
spectrum, said Bill Wright, a computer technician and communications 
specialist with Central Dispatch.


But all of the radios linked to Central Dispatch, more than 1,600 in 
all, will have to be reprogrammed or replaced. Newer models are 
reprogrammable, but hundreds of older models will have to be replaced 
entirely because they are incompatible with the new frequencies.


As part of the plan, however, no local agencies will be responsible for 
the costs.


Nextel is supposed to pay for replacing the radios or pay for 
reprogramming the radios, Wright said. They are to foot the bill on 
that. The FCC has basically mandated this.


Wright said the reprogramming process will take varying amounts of time 
depending on the size of their agency and the number of radios they 
have. Evansville police, for example, will take longer than smaller 
agencies.


For the Police Department it may take a month or two for them to get 
all of their work done, Wright said.


Agencies are still in the process of taking inventory of what radios 
will need to be reprogrammed and what will need to be replaced, Wright said.


JoAnne Smith, the director of Central Dispatch, cautioned that it is a 
long process that still has some time before the changes take place.


Its not anything that's going to happen fast, she said. When anybody 
lays a hand on a new radio will be more than a year from now. And we 
started this a year and a half ago.


This is also just the first of four phases across the country. States 
were divided up into the different phases, with the last one consisting 
of border states where treaties with Canada and Mexico make the process 
even more difficult.


Wright said Nextel initially set aside $2 billion to cover the 
reconfiguration, but the FCC has since decided against a cap for costs.


He said it will achieve the goal of providing Nextel its own space on 
the spectrum and eliminating interference to public safety, but that 
some people question if this was the best option.


I think everybody has a lot of questions about whether it makes sense 
or not, Wright said. It makes sense as far as the interference goes. 
It moves them out of the bandwidth and it definitely solves the problem. 
But only Nextel knows if it is going to be profitable for them or not.


http://www.courierpress.com/news/2007/jan/22/safety-radios-to-get-update/
--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


[WISPA] Riverside, CA Wifi

2007-01-23 Thread Dawn DiPietro

All,

Yes I know posted below is yet another press release on a MuniWiFi 
popping up. Since the RFP's are being issued fast and furious recently 
you cannot read the news without running across another MuniWifi press 
release. I do feel there is too much emphasis placed on the Wifi access 
provided to the public. According to a recent study just under 50% of 
these networks actually provide access to the public. There are way more 
uses for these networks but those services do not get as much publicity 
as they deserve. In my opinion that is part of the reason for resistance 
among some providers. Fortunately though Public Safety is getting more 
recognition than it used to. Maybe there is hope after all.


On a side note I do wish they would not compare the speed of the network 
to dial up. To me it's like saying this car goes 100X faster then walking.


Well, that is enough rambling from me for now. ;-)

Regards,
Dawn DiPietro


Monday, January 22, 2007
Riverside, California: Rides Wi-Fi Wave to Future Growth
Multi-Layer Wireless Access Network Extends border-to-border over City's 
86 square miles


Riverside, Calif. (January 22, 2007) -- Riverside, California wants to 
be known as a city in the digital age and the leader in technology 
deployment.


Call it a municipal status symbol, but when Phase I of a three-phase 
rollout becomes available in early February 2007, the City of Riverside 
will blanket its entire 86 square miles with free wireless Internet 
network, giving the City an entirely new identity as one of the most 
wired - or unwired - municipalities in the state of California.


The robust network, built by ATT, is also the largest planned to date 
for public use by residents (2.4 GHz) and businesses as well as for City 
municipal use and public-safety communications (4.9 GHz). Riverside 
officials hope that making high-speed Internet as accessible as water or 
electricity across its borders will attract more technology and biotech 
companies - and the young, upwardly mobile employees they bring.


We are willing to take the necessary steps so that companies, investors 
and workers identify us as a progressive municipality that fully 
supports the growth and success of firms that do business here, said 
Steve Reneker, Chief Information Officer, City of Riverside. Access 
points will be placed at the rate of 30-35 per square mile with each 
having a range of approximately 1,000 feet depending on topography. The 
City will transform all of its 86 square miles into WI-FI hot spots by 
installing more than 1,000 cell points on street lights, traffic 
signals, and City facilities (so areas further than 1,000 feet from any 
of these may have limited to no access).


Speeds will vary based on the location of access (outside versus inside 
and proximity to an access point). Average speeds are expected to be 
512Kbps, which is 10 times faster that a 56Kbps dial up connection many 
of our households still use. Currently, the City runs a free wireless 
network, but it is limited to 35 blocks in the downtown district.


Riverside's WI-FI project is designed to benefit local merchants looking 
to attract residents who eat or shop anywhere in the City and still want 
access to e-mail, work projects or the Internet. Additionally, it will 
also enable companies and residents looking for more cost-effective 
Internet service providers to consider this free wireless network. A 
range of ad-free, paid subscription options, including day passes and 
monthly subscriptions will also be available with speeds of up to 1 
Megabit per second (Mbps). Final details on the service packages and 
pricing will be announced at the launch of the service.


According to the report, California Cybercities 2006, published by the 
American Electronics Association, the Riverside-San Bernardino County 
area was recognized as the second fastest growing high-technology center 
in California. It also ranked seventh in highest concentration of 
high-tech jobs in the state, with nearly 21,400 high-tech jobs in the 
Region.


As more cities strive to be cutting edge and use the Internet as an 
economic development tool, few have been unable to execute, added 
Reneker. Making strategic investments in programs that create a more 
business- and tech-friendly environment definitely demonstrate the 
City's commitment to nurturing and growing the technology sector.


Reneker also noted that technology will play an important role in the 
City's future prosperity and renaissance, particularly as it relates to 
the Wi-Fi popularity as a way to experience the momentum of the 
downtown Riverside area.


Riverside is leading the effort in the Inland Empire to provide its 
residents and businesses with full access, said Reneker. This network 
will definitely make our City more attractive for high-tech businesses.


The mesh network of Internet access points covering the City of 
Riverside border-to-border is part of the ongoing effort to promote 

RE: [WISPA] SmartPhone Happiness...

2007-01-23 Thread Gino Villarini
I personally use the Motorola A1200 or Ming, its not available in the US
, but you can get it through Ebay.  Its Linux based, so lots of goodies
for it around.  It GSM/GPRS Quad band, Bluetooth and all touchscreen
based like the Iphone...

Gino A. Villarini
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145
-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Rich Comroe
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 11:01 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] SmartPhone Happiness...

Absolutely amazing how many windows phones have come out in the last few
months.  Just 12 months ago there were only 3 ... and now there's got'ta
be dozens.  I love my PPC6700 so much I bought a 2nd one ... EVDO /
RTT1X / IS95 tri-mode, bluetooth, wifi, camera, added a couple GB on
mini-SD, slide-out full keyboard, huge screen.  Got Microsoft VC++
enterprise ... it comes with windows mobile 5 development environment.
But I was disappointed at how stripped down the windows mobile version
of MFC was.

If you can get one without the neutered OS you'll be happier.  The
carriers have stripped key networking components of the OS to keep you
from using your phone as a wifi access point for nearby laptops.  I've
got the original fully capable OS and it's amazing what you can do.  If
you see a pop-up that says a newer version of OS is available, click
here ... DON'T!!!  It's a neutered version from your carrier (not from
Microsoft) which removes specific dial-up networking components to limit
your abilities.

You mention Linux as the preferred platform.  My old Moto buddies tell
me Moto offered a Linux based phone platform for 2 whole years and
NOBODY stepped up for developing applications ... so Moto abandonned it
switching to Windows to launch the Q phone.  I think it casts doubt
whether the market really wanted a Linux platform phone.  I mean, when
you offer a supported Linux product and nobody gives a hoot ... what
would you conclude?

Rich
  - Original Message - 
  From: Steve Stroh 
  To: WISPA General List 
  Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 7:10 PM
  Subject: Re: [WISPA] SmartPhone Happiness...



  Apparently Nokia is now out with the N800, the successor to the 770.  
  I don't have techno-lust details yet - look for yourself at http:// 
  www.nseries.com/products/n800/#l=products,n800, but friends tell me  
  it fixes the weaknesses of the 770, and is the preferred Linux  
  hacking platform (cool open source stuff coming out for it) for  
  portable Internet-connected devices.

  One of the funnier... cooler... things I've seen of late is Bluetooth

  GPS devices. One I saw REALLY impressed me - it was deep inside a  
  restaurant, but was still able to get a fix from the windows more  
  than 20' away.


  Thanks,

  Steve


  On Jan 22, 2007, at Jan 22  10:49 AM, Travis Johnson wrote:

   Matt,
  
   It's funny you posted this message today I just picked up a new

   test phone I am trying to replace my Treo 650. I grabbed an HP  
   iPaq 6945 from Cingular for $189 (with two year contract) and have  
   been playing with it on an off for the last couple of days.
  
   The biggest advantage to this phone is the built-in GPS, along with

   WiFi and Bluetooth. There are some neat functions that are already  
   built-in to the main OS... such as the camera showing GPS  
   coordinates on the picture when you take it (if you enable that  
   option). Also, many commercial map programs (TomTom 6, etc.) work  
   on this phone with the GPS. With a simple car mount and car  
   adapter, you have a full-fledged GPS device built into your phone.  
   There are also programs that will connect to WiFi and update GPS  
   coordinates to a website... so you could have real-time locations  
   for your installers with no monthly fee. ;)
  
   It's running Windows Mobile 5, which is better than any other  
   Windows phone OS I have used, but still not as easy to navigate as  
   the Palm OS. The biggest feature on the Treo 650 for me is the SMS  
   messaging. It's easy to access (single button) and it keeps a chat  
   dialog going with each person you have talked to. I send and  
   receive over 100 messages per day, sometimes 200-300. It's quick,  
   easy, and can be done with one hand. If there was just a simple  
   program that would function the same, the iPaq could be a great  
   phone for me.
  
   I should also mention I purchased a Nokia 770 Internet Tablet. This

   is a pretty cool device as well built in WiFi and Bluetooth,  
   running Linux with a nice GUI. Nice wide, bright screen too. It  
   just doesn't have a phone or GPS, just WiFi. Still pretty cool for  
   that type of a device.
  
   Travis
   Microserv


  ---

  Steve Stroh
  425-939-0076 | [EMAIL PROTECTED] | www.stevestroh.com




  -- 
  WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

  Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
  http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

  Archives: 

Re: [WISPA] SmartPhone Happiness...

2007-01-23 Thread Tim Wolfe
OK, Since we are on this topic?. I picked up a Samsung BlackJack about a 
week ago, and to this point, I have some very mixed emotions?. I used to 
have an old Palm PDA and I carried my cell phone, so You can understand 
that trying to go to one device was a no brainer?. I love the look and 
feel of the phone, as it is a LOT slimmer than a Treo or Blackberry and 
the bluetooth headset and built in speaker phone makes it a breeze to 
talk and work, drive etc. while on the phone. The screen is nice and 
bright, and since it runs Windows mobile 5, it is fairly familiar when 
You look at the screen and the way it interacts with the user. The on 
board camera works great and takes wonderful photos after You get the 
settings right(1.4 MegaPixel). Now for the bad stuff!. It EATS 
batteries. Samsung must be aware of this?, as they shipped it out with 2 
batt. in the box. If You leave the house with a fresh batt. installed, 
You can bet that it will almost be out of juice by the time You walk in 
the door at night?, so if You are a true road warrior?, You may be 
screwed without a spot to plug in the charger during the day?.. It also 
comes with a data/modem  cable that allows You to sync. the phone with 
Outlook on Your desktop. It even ships with a registered copy of Outlook 
and the key so You can do a fresh install. All of that would be great if 
I could just get the [EMAIL PROTECTED] phone to sync with the Outlook program!.To 
this point?, it is a no-go!. Another negative is that You can only edit 
Your appointment settings on the desk top computer. If You are on the 
road and want to edit or add a new event or appointment?, FORGET IT!. 
You will have to write it on a piece of paper and enter it when You get 
back to the PC. THAT IS STUPID! Even though it touts being an MP3 
player, You still need to install a microSD card for storage(extra 
expense) AND there is no 1/8 phone jack for head phones???. If You want 
head phones?, You have to buy a proprietary setup from Samsung and it 
plugs into the same port as the data cable. What this means is that if 
You are on the plane and You want to listen to music, thats great?, but 
don't forget, You will also need to charge the batt. at some point, and 
You CAN NOT do both, unless You pack the spare batt. along to every 
place You go AND the portable charger that uses a 110AC outlet and a 
small black charger box.



Patrick Leary wrote:

Nice OT thread guys; I am learning and hope others chime in.

Patrick Leary

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Travis Johnson
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 10:50 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] SmartPhone Happiness...

Matt,

It's funny you posted this message today I just picked up a new 
test phone I am trying to replace my Treo 650. I grabbed an HP iPaq 
6945 from Cingular for $189 (with two year contract) and have been 
playing with it on an off for the last couple of days.


The biggest advantage to this phone is the built-in GPS, along with WiFi

and Bluetooth. There are some neat functions that are already built-in 
to the main OS... such as the camera showing GPS coordinates on the 
picture when you take it (if you enable that option). Also, many 
commercial map programs (TomTom 6, etc.) work on this phone with the 
GPS. With a simple car mount and car adapter, you have a full-fledged 
GPS device built into your phone. There are also programs that will 
connect to WiFi and update GPS coordinates to a website... so you could 
have real-time locations for your installers with no monthly fee. ;)


It's running Windows Mobile 5, which is better than any other Windows 
phone OS I have used, but still not as easy to navigate as the Palm OS. 
The biggest feature on the Treo 650 for me is the SMS messaging. It's 
easy to access (single button) and it keeps a chat dialog going with 
each person you have talked to. I send and receive over 100 messages per


day, sometimes 200-300. It's quick, easy, and can be done with one hand.

If there was just a simple program that would function the same, the 
iPaq could be a great phone for me.


I should also mention I purchased a Nokia 770 Internet Tablet. This is a

pretty cool device as well built in WiFi and Bluetooth, running 
Linux with a nice GUI. Nice wide, bright screen too. It just doesn't 
have a phone or GPS, just WiFi. Still pretty cool for that type of a

device.

Travis
Microserv

Matt Larsen - Lists wrote:
  
It was finally time to replace my Nokia 6800 with 600 hours and a 
broken screen from being dropped too many times, so I decided to get a



  

Nokia E70 phone.

It has been a little bit of a challenge, but it is pretty close to 
cell phone nirvana.  It has been able to do I have wanted to 
accomplish with a PDA or cell phone combined.


The first main issue was getting the phone contacts/calendar/notes 
synchronized with my PC.  My previous phone was extremely flaky when 
used with 

[WISPA] Att explained

2007-01-23 Thread Dawn DiPietro

All,

Finally a clear understanding of the telecommunications industry.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bj1Mtv9cD0I

Regards,
Dawn DiPietro




--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] Public safety wants interoperability funds tied to DHS guidelines

2007-01-23 Thread Dawn DiPietro

Scriv,

To be honest with you this article only mentions 700MHz as a way to 
generate revenue from the auction to pay for public safety interoperability.
There are some public safety officials that feel that DHS should fund 
public safety interoperability instead of waiting for the auction since 
there is

a deadline of Sept 30 as to when funding needs to be distributed by.

As I understand it WISP's should not expect to get a piece of this 
spectrum unless they open their wallets and bid for it. Even then it 
would be
unusable to the average WISP because the equipment would be 
prohibitively expensive. The main reason the average WISP can deploy their
network is because the equipment costs are reasonably priced, relatively 
speaking.


Regards,
Dawn DiPietro


John Scrivner wrote:


Dawn,
700 MHz availability is a big deal for us. Can you please take the 
points in this article apart and let us know what you know about what 
is going on here? If funds are available which could help us gain 
licensed spectrum then knowing the inside scoop on this process is a 
big deal and could yield us spectrum. Your thoughts are appreciated. I 
have to admit I am out of the loop on the status of 700 MHz currently. 
There have been so many changes in direction and policy regarding this 
band that I do not know where we stand with access to this spectrum. I 
heard at the WCA show last week that there will be an auction of some 
of that band in about 6 months. That is all I know currently.


On a side note, unless you own 2.3 or 2.5 GHz spectrum there was 
little for you to see at the WCA show this time around. I was there to 
look for direction in the AWS spectrum I own now. There was very 
little talk of AWS at this show.

Scriv



Dawn DiPietro wrote:


All,

As quoted from the article;

Under a law passed in December, the Department of Commerce is 
required to award $1 billion in interoperability grants by Sept. 30.
While public-safety officials have applauded the decision by Congress 
to make the $1 billion in funding available immediately�instead
of waiting for the completion of the 700 MHz auction, which will 
provide the revenue source for the money�they have expressed

concern about the disbursement process.

I found this very interesting and may shed some light on what the 
motive behind the 700MHz space.


Full article here;
http://mrtmag.com/news/publicsafety/interoperability-dhs-guidelines-011706/ 




Regards,
Dawn DiPietro





--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


RE: [WISPA] Att explained

2007-01-23 Thread Dennis Burgess - 2K Wireless
That was worth watching.  The sad part is.  ITS ALMOST ALL TRUE!

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Dawn DiPietro
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 10:07 AM
To: isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com; WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Att explained

All,

Finally a clear understanding of the telecommunications industry.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bj1Mtv9cD0I

Regards,
Dawn DiPietro




-- 
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


-- 
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] SmartPhone Happiness...

2007-01-23 Thread Chad Halsted

Matt,

Have you had a chance to play with SSH utilities.  I'm looking for the
same phone and have heard others using it to SSH into their Star-OS
boxes with good success.

Mobile SSH has a free trial and should work with the E70.



On 1/22/07, Matt Larsen - Lists [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

It was finally time to replace my Nokia 6800 with 600 hours and a broken
screen from being dropped too many times, so I decided to get a Nokia
E70 phone.

It has been a little bit of a challenge, but it is pretty close to cell
phone nirvana.  It has been able to do I have wanted to accomplish with
a PDA or cell phone combined.

The first main issue was getting the phone contacts/calendar/notes
synchronized with my PC.  My previous phone was extremely flaky when
used with the Nokia PC Suite software, and only connected about one in
every 10 times.   I had to install, reinstall, run a registry cleaner
and then reinstall the software but I was finally able to get a reliable
connection between my PC and phone.  Once accomplished, I was able to
get all of my items synced up in a repeatable, reliable fashion.   With
all their available resources, I am amazed that Nokia was not able to
this process worked out better.

The second item was seeing how Internet access worked on the phone.
GPRS seems to work fine, but I was more interested in the wifi
connectivity feature of the phone.  The E70 will browse for an available
access point and the process for connecting is pretty straightforward.
I have to pass on huge props for the Internet browser on the E70.  I
would prefer using the smaller screen E70 browser than the browser on
all of the PocketPCs that I have used.  It is that good.  It was
reliable, viewable, easy to navigate and there have been no weird format
surprises.   All told - the Internet access components work very well.
I have not gotten the instant messaging to work yet, but it looks like
other have, so I will still have that to work on.

The last and most interesting piece was the struggle to get VOIP working
on a cell phone.  My cell coverage at my house and many other places in
my service area is very spotty, so I have been looking forward to having
a phone that could roam to wifi and keep my roaming minutes down to a
minimum.  I was able to find a couple of links to guides on how to set
the phone up with an asterisk voip server and was finally able to get it
to connect to my office voip phone system.  After all the hassles and
reported problems on user forums, I was very pleasantly surprised by the
performance of the voip part of the E70.  It is actually clearer than
regular cell calls, with just a little bit of breakup when the wifi
signal gets low.  Best of all, my outgoing calls all go through my
office system when I am in range of a wifi access point, meaning less
minutes on my cell phone plan.  I should also be able to use the voip
when I go to remote tower sites that used to not work at all on the
regular cell network or incurred roaming charges.

All in all, I am very impressed with the E70.  I am going to officially
retire my iPaqs to other tasks and use this as my primary PIM/phone/voip
phone.

Matt Larsen
vistabeam.com

PS - I purchased my E70 from Tiger Direct for about $435, but they are
also available at voip-supply.com for $385.



--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/




--
Chad Halsted
The Computer Works
Conway, AR
www.tcworks.net
--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


[WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread Dawn DiPietro

 CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

1/22/2007 1:46:18 PM, by Nate Anderson

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) wants to find out exactly how 
competitive the US broadband market is. To do that, it needs access to 
the raw data collected by the FCC, but the agency has refused to turn it 
over on the grounds that it could give a competitive advantage to other 
companies. CPI now finds itself in a District Court battle against the 
agency, which is being supported by ATT, Verizon, and the three major 
industry trade groups: NCTA (cable), CTIA (wireless), and USTA (telephone).


CPI wants the FCC database of Form 477 filings. These documents are 
filed with the FCC by every telecom company in the US, and they give the 
agency data on each company's line deployments, broken down by ZIP code 
(and generally unaudited by the FCC). The FCC then uses this data to 
generate reports about the state of broadband competition, usually 
arguing that nothing radical needs to be done.


But the agency's methods for generating these reports have come under 
scrutiny, and CPI wants to take a look for itself. When talking about 
broadband deployment, for instance, the FCC says that any particular ZIP 
code has broadband access if even a single cable or DSL connection 
exists there. It also classes broadband as anything above 200kbps—a 
woefully low standard for any true broadband connection.


The General Accounting Office, the federal government's internal 
watchdog agency, took the FCC to task (PDF) last May for the way it 
prepared these reports. The GAO's own examination of Form 477 data found 
that the median number of broadband options in a particular ZIP code was 
two, not eight as the FCC claimed.


CPI filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the FCC on 
August 24. After the statutory 20 business days had passed without any 
word from the agency, CPI filed suit on September 25, 2006. That 
apparently got the FCC's attention; the FOIA request was officially 
denied the next day.


The matter is now in the hands of a federal judge, and the FCC is trying 
to have the case dismissed. The agency argues that the material in the 
reports is confidential business information and that the release of it 
could damage the companies involved. In a court filing, Alan Feldman of 
the FCC tells the court how this might work. For example, he says, 
information about how a company's number of lines has increased or 
decreased in a particular area over time provides competitors with 
insights into how that company is focusing its investment and marketing 
efforts. He also notes that most filers requested confidentiality for 
their data.


CPI hopes to add the Form 477 data to its Media Tracker, a web site that 
shows consumers the available broadband providers, cable operators, 
television and radio stations, and newspapers in the area.


http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070122-8674.html
--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread Peter R.
You know that if they don't want to give up the raw data that they have 
fudged the heck out of it!
It has been suggested by many folks, including Peter Huber, that it 
might be time to put the FCC out to pasture.


- Peter

--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] Climbing Harness

2007-01-23 Thread David Sovereen
www.midwestunlimited.com.  The Elk River Eagle LE or LX harnesses are good 
and comfortable at a good price-point.  I would highly recommend NOT buying 
a used harness.  Your harness is to keep you from falling to your death and 
you don't want to rely on a used harness that you don't know the complete 
history/condition of.


Dave

- Original Message - 
From: Forbes Mercy [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 3:44 PM
Subject: [WISPA] Climbing Harness


Hello Fellow WISP's

I need to purchase a tower climbing harness.  If you have one to sell, 
great, if you know of a company that sells them that would be great too.


Thanks,
Forbes Mercy
President - Washington Broadband, Inc.

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.410 / Virus Database: 268.17.5/645 - Release Date: 1/22/2007

--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/

--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread Marlon K. Schafer
yeah, this has been going on for quite a while now (this is the second 
round).  So far the FCC has held up.


I think we should contact the CTIA and see what we can do to lend support to 
them (and the FCC) on this issue.  Anyone have any thoughts on the issue 
and/or know anyone?


laters,
marlon

- Original Message - 
From: Dawn DiPietro [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 4:57 PM
Subject: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition 
in the US




 CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

1/22/2007 1:46:18 PM, by Nate Anderson

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) wants to find out exactly how 
competitive the US broadband market is. To do that, it needs access to the 
raw data collected by the FCC, but the agency has refused to turn it over 
on the grounds that it could give a competitive advantage to other 
companies. CPI now finds itself in a District Court battle against the 
agency, which is being supported by ATT, Verizon, and the three major 
industry trade groups: NCTA (cable), CTIA (wireless), and USTA 
(telephone).


CPI wants the FCC database of Form 477 filings. These documents are filed 
with the FCC by every telecom company in the US, and they give the agency 
data on each company's line deployments, broken down by ZIP code (and 
generally unaudited by the FCC). The FCC then uses this data to generate 
reports about the state of broadband competition, usually arguing that 
nothing radical needs to be done.


But the agency's methods for generating these reports have come under 
scrutiny, and CPI wants to take a look for itself. When talking about 
broadband deployment, for instance, the FCC says that any particular ZIP 
code has broadband access if even a single cable or DSL connection exists 
there. It also classes broadband as anything above 200kbps—a woefully 
low standard for any true broadband connection.


The General Accounting Office, the federal government's internal watchdog 
agency, took the FCC to task (PDF) last May for the way it prepared these 
reports. The GAO's own examination of Form 477 data found that the median 
number of broadband options in a particular ZIP code was two, not eight as 
the FCC claimed.


CPI filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the FCC on 
August 24. After the statutory 20 business days had passed without any 
word from the agency, CPI filed suit on September 25, 2006. That 
apparently got the FCC's attention; the FOIA request was officially denied 
the next day.


The matter is now in the hands of a federal judge, and the FCC is trying 
to have the case dismissed. The agency argues that the material in the 
reports is confidential business information and that the release of it 
could damage the companies involved. In a court filing, Alan Feldman of 
the FCC tells the court how this might work. For example, he says, 
information about how a company's number of lines has increased or 
decreased in a particular area over time provides competitors with 
insights into how that company is focusing its investment and marketing 
efforts. He also notes that most filers requested confidentiality for 
their data.


CPI hopes to add the Form 477 data to its Media Tracker, a web site that 
shows consumers the available broadband providers, cable operators, 
television and radio stations, and newspapers in the area.


http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070122-8674.html
--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/ 


--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadbandcompetition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread Marlon K. Schafer

Not true at all Peter.

When filling out the form there's an option to keep the info private.  They 
are only honoring their word.


laters,
marlon

- Original Message - 
From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 6:55 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of 
broadbandcompetition in the US



You know that if they don't want to give up the raw data that they have 
fudged the heck out of it!
It has been suggested by many folks, including Peter Huber, that it might 
be time to put the FCC out to pasture.


- Peter

--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/ 


--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread John Scrivner
Killing the FCC would simply place the responsibility for the regulatory 
control of the spectrum in the US to another federal agency. Not sure I 
buy into the idea that one fed agency (even if created from scratch) can 
do things better than what we have now.

Scriv



Peter R. wrote:

You know that if they don't want to give up the raw data that they 
have fudged the heck out of it!
It has been suggested by many folks, including Peter Huber, that it 
might be time to put the FCC out to pasture.


- Peter


--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread John Scrivner
Sorry to answer my own post but some clarifications are in order. I am 
not trying to state that I am satisfied, in any way, with the FCC by my 
desire to keep them  intact. I am only stating that I do not think it is 
within the power of our own government to produce a different regulatory 
framework that would do the job any better. In fact it could be even 
worse than it is now if built from scratch again by our own elected 
officials. I am guessing that a more negative result could be just as 
plausible if not more so.


Better to keep the snake we know visible in the light with a firm grasp 
on his head than to wander around him in the dark wondering from where 
and how he may strike.

Scriv



John Scrivner wrote:

Killing the FCC would simply place the responsibility for the 
regulatory control of the spectrum in the US to another federal 
agency. Not sure I buy into the idea that one fed agency (even if 
created from scratch) can do things better than what we have now.

Scriv



Peter R. wrote:

You know that if they don't want to give up the raw data that they 
have fudged the heck out of it!
It has been suggested by many folks, including Peter Huber, that it 
might be time to put the FCC out to pasture.


- Peter


--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


Re: [WISPA] CPI suing FCC to get at real state of broadband competition in the US

2007-01-23 Thread Jack Unger
Yes, there has been an Abolish the FCC movement alive for at least 10 
and probably 20 years. FOMHR (For Our Many Happy Readers) here are two 
(of the many) points of view:


http://news.com.com/2010-1028-5226979.html

http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2005/05/b677863.html


jack



Peter R. wrote:
You know that if they don't want to give up the raw data that they have 
fudged the heck out of it!
It has been suggested by many folks, including Peter Huber, that it 
might be time to put the FCC out to pasture.


- Peter



--
Jack Unger ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) - President, Ask-Wi.Com, Inc.
Serving the License-Free Wireless Industry Since 1993
Author of the WISP Handbook - Deploying License-Free Wireless WANs
True Vendor-Neutral WISP Consulting-Training-Troubleshooting
Newsletters Downloadable from http://ask-wi.com/newsletters.html
Phone (VoIP Over Broadband Wireless) 818-227-4220  www.ask-wi.com



--
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/