Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

2007-05-11 Thread Pete Davis
The $10/mo for web access with Sprint ONLY applies to the use on the 
phone. When you plug in the data cable, and use it as a modem, its like 
$0.30/kb. Learning that lesson cost me.

The unlimited phone-as-a-modem or data card rate is around $39/mo.

Does anyone know if there are drivers/capabilities to link a data card 
to a Mikrotik or StarOS box? I guess that there are other Linux drivers 
out there, so my thinking may work.
I have considered for some time the possibilities of making a box to 
mount in my car (car-puter) with a Sprint (or Cingular, or Verizon, or 
whoever) cellular type data connection, with a WIFI client as the 
primary (or secondary) mode of connection. With DDNS, access to the dash 
mounted camera, GPS stream, etc should be easy enough, making it a 
roll-your-own LowJack type system. Also, in the car, an ethernet jack to 
plug a laptop into could be nice, as well as opening the possibilities 
to put in an ATA to make VOIP calls, as well as adding a WIFI AP. $39/mo 
for unlimited data connectivity, especially if it gives the 
speed/latency required to do VOIP, seems like a bargain compared to 
$129/mo for 2000 minutes. I guess a Windows-based system could do all of 
those things, but the RAM/processor/etc/boot time/bluescreens associated 
with Windoze don't seem to make it conducive to this type of project, IMO.


The car-puter installation plan things that I have read about seem to 
focus on GPS and MP3 playing. Since my wreck 6 yrs ago, where I couldn't 
prove to the insurance company (5 eyewitnesses from every direction from 
the intersection and a police report weren't good enough) that I had the 
green light. I have been thinking about a car-mounted DVR with cameras 
in the grill, the dash, and in the back to offer video defense in a car 
accident claim. Showing the judge, the insurance agent, or whoever a DVD 
of the video surveillance of the accident could save a lot of time and 
hassle.


What I wish someone would sell for a car (these things probably all 
exist in one form or another with various systems) is a computer that 
will act as a:
   DVR security cam recorder (cam pointed at the driver seat to 
prosecute the car thief, + cams on bumpers to witness accidents)

   Data port (ethernet + WIFI AP)
   Web server (with DDNS support to access the stored data, even when 
the car is away from the house, like at an impound yard or after being 
stolen)

   MP3 player
   Realtime ODBII scanning/recording/diagnostics of the car.
   VOIP system.
   GPS stream recording. (to show he teenage driver when/how fast she 
was really driving)


I would think that these things could all be incorporated for under $2k, 
mounted in the trunk, and it would be something that would sell like 
crazy for $3k installed.


I guess what I would like is a retail version of this with more features:

http://www.popsci.com/popsci/how20/d04305f2dbbf1110vgnvcm104eecbccdrcrd.html

pd


Rich Comroe wrote:
What a rip!  Sprint told me it's only $300-400 to get out of a Sprint 
contract.  What's it cost to early terminate a Cingular contract?  Why 
doesn't he just terminate?  Getting a $1200 monthly bill is 
ridiculous! UNLIMITED data to a Sprint windows phone is only about 
$10/month, and there's no way to limit it to not operate tethered to a 
computer (other than unreasonably large download usage).  And it's 
EVDO, so it blows away that measley 125 - 175 kbit.  I really think 
those PCMCIA cards are a rip-off for service cost compared to just 
getting unlimited data service to your cellphone.  I love ppc6700 
windows phones ... a lot lighter and smaller than a laptop yet nearly 
as capable.


Rich

- Original Message - From: Mike Hammett 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 8:08 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular



oh, I'm most certainly under $1200, even for a whole year.  :-p

Anyone have experience getting out of a bad Cingular deal?


-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com


- Original Message - From: Scott Reed [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 7:48 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


Even if he can't get out of the Cingular contract, I would think 
paying you your normal rates would cost less than $1200 to 
Cingular.  Suggest that your unlimited service is still less 
expensive than overages.


Mike Hammett wrote:
I have a potential customer that wanted to try out my service.  
He's got money, so I wasn't afraid he was looking to get something 
for nothing.  He has Cingular now and can only get 125 - 175 kbit 
out of it. I clearly can provide a faster less latent service for a 
lower monthly cost (costs him $70/month).


Apparently he wasn't on the unlimited rate plan and got hit with a 
$1200 bill.  He doesn't think he can get out of his Cingular.  *argh*


That said, can anyone think of a way to hookup a 

Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

2007-05-11 Thread Mike Hammett
Last I checked, 3G systems have horrible latency, therefore are not good for 
VoIP.



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com


- Original Message - 
From: Pete Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 7:09 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


The $10/mo for web access with Sprint ONLY applies to the use on the 
phone. When you plug in the data cable, and use it as a modem, its like 
$0.30/kb. Learning that lesson cost me.

The unlimited phone-as-a-modem or data card rate is around $39/mo.

Does anyone know if there are drivers/capabilities to link a data card to 
a Mikrotik or StarOS box? I guess that there are other Linux drivers out 
there, so my thinking may work.
I have considered for some time the possibilities of making a box to mount 
in my car (car-puter) with a Sprint (or Cingular, or Verizon, or whoever) 
cellular type data connection, with a WIFI client as the primary (or 
secondary) mode of connection. With DDNS, access to the dash mounted 
camera, GPS stream, etc should be easy enough, making it a roll-your-own 
LowJack type system. Also, in the car, an ethernet jack to plug a laptop 
into could be nice, as well as opening the possibilities to put in an ATA 
to make VOIP calls, as well as adding a WIFI AP. $39/mo for unlimited data 
connectivity, especially if it gives the speed/latency required to do 
VOIP, seems like a bargain compared to $129/mo for 2000 minutes. I guess a 
Windows-based system could do all of those things, but the 
RAM/processor/etc/boot time/bluescreens associated with Windoze don't seem 
to make it conducive to this type of project, IMO.


The car-puter installation plan things that I have read about seem to 
focus on GPS and MP3 playing. Since my wreck 6 yrs ago, where I couldn't 
prove to the insurance company (5 eyewitnesses from every direction from 
the intersection and a police report weren't good enough) that I had the 
green light. I have been thinking about a car-mounted DVR with cameras in 
the grill, the dash, and in the back to offer video defense in a car 
accident claim. Showing the judge, the insurance agent, or whoever a DVD 
of the video surveillance of the accident could save a lot of time and 
hassle.


What I wish someone would sell for a car (these things probably all exist 
in one form or another with various systems) is a computer that will act 
as a:
   DVR security cam recorder (cam pointed at the driver seat to prosecute 
the car thief, + cams on bumpers to witness accidents)

   Data port (ethernet + WIFI AP)
   Web server (with DDNS support to access the stored data, even when the 
car is away from the house, like at an impound yard or after being stolen)

   MP3 player
   Realtime ODBII scanning/recording/diagnostics of the car.
   VOIP system.
   GPS stream recording. (to show he teenage driver when/how fast she was 
really driving)


I would think that these things could all be incorporated for under $2k, 
mounted in the trunk, and it would be something that would sell like crazy 
for $3k installed.


I guess what I would like is a retail version of this with more features:

http://www.popsci.com/popsci/how20/d04305f2dbbf1110vgnvcm104eecbccdrcrd.html

pd


Rich Comroe wrote:
What a rip!  Sprint told me it's only $300-400 to get out of a Sprint 
contract.  What's it cost to early terminate a Cingular contract?  Why 
doesn't he just terminate?  Getting a $1200 monthly bill is ridiculous! 
UNLIMITED data to a Sprint windows phone is only about $10/month, and 
there's no way to limit it to not operate tethered to a computer (other 
than unreasonably large download usage).  And it's EVDO, so it blows away 
that measley 125 - 175 kbit.  I really think those PCMCIA cards are a 
rip-off for service cost compared to just getting unlimited data service 
to your cellphone.  I love ppc6700 windows phones ... a lot lighter and 
smaller than a laptop yet nearly as capable.


Rich

- Original Message - From: Mike Hammett 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 8:08 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular



oh, I'm most certainly under $1200, even for a whole year.  :-p

Anyone have experience getting out of a bad Cingular deal?


-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com


- Original Message - From: Scott Reed [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 7:48 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


Even if he can't get out of the Cingular contract, I would think paying 
you your normal rates would cost less than $1200 to Cingular.  Suggest 
that your unlimited service is still less expensive than overages.


Mike Hammett wrote:
I have a potential customer that wanted to try out my service.  He's 
got money, so I wasn't afraid he was looking to get something for 
nothing.  He has 

Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

2007-05-11 Thread Ryan Langseth


On May 11, 2007, at 7:09 AM, Pete Davis wrote:

The $10/mo for web access with Sprint ONLY applies to the use on  
the phone. When you plug in the data cable, and use it as a modem,  
its like $0.30/kb. Learning that lesson cost me.

The unlimited phone-as-a-modem or data card rate is around $39/mo.

Does anyone know if there are drivers/capabilities to link a data  
card to a Mikrotik or StarOS box? I guess that there are other  
Linux drivers out there, so my thinking may work.
I have considered for some time the possibilities of making a box  
to mount in my car (car-puter) with a Sprint (or Cingular, or  
Verizon, or whoever) cellular type data connection, with a WIFI  
client as the primary (or secondary) mode of connection. With DDNS,  
access to the dash mounted camera, GPS stream, etc should be easy  
enough, making it a roll-your-own LowJack type system. Also, in the  
car, an ethernet jack to plug a laptop into could be nice, as well  
as opening the possibilities to put in an ATA to make VOIP calls,  
as well as adding a WIFI AP. $39/mo for unlimited data  
connectivity, especially if it gives the speed/latency required to  
do VOIP, seems like a bargain compared to $129/mo for 2000 minutes.  
I guess a Windows-based system could do all of those things, but  
the RAM/processor/etc/boot time/bluescreens associated with Windoze  
don't seem to make it conducive to this type of project, IMO.


Its not mikrotik or starOS, but it is linux:
http://www.stompboxnetworks.com/

there are some similar commercial versions of it too.


Ryan

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RE: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless

2007-05-11 Thread Grenier, Craig
I hear ya.  It sounds great.  Don't feed the trolls =D

Craig M. Grenier 
Production TAC Engineer 
Savvis, Inc.
e-mail: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Built to RespondTM 

This message contains information which may be confidential and/or
privileged.  Unless you are the intended recipient (or authorized to
receive for the intended recipient), you may not read, use, copy or
disclose to anyone the message or any information contained in the
message. If you have received the message in error, please advise the
sender by reply e-mail at [EMAIL PROTECTED] and delete the
message and any attachment(s) thereto without retaining any copies.


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of John Scrivner
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 7:01 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless

What do you mean? I have been talking to him for two months about this. 
Where did you get that this is an ad? I asked him to post this message 
to get a feel for how WISPs would respond. He even sent it to me for 
review prior to sending it out here. I guess I am having trouble 
understanding why this would be considered an ad. They are looking for 
support for a declaratory ruling from the FCC on this matter. Mike would

like to see WISPA help him on this and I think we should at least 
consider this.
Scriv


Dawn DiPietro wrote:

 Sounds like an ad too. :-)


 Jory Privett wrote:

 Sounds like a great idea.  I only have one issue from what I read 
 here, $500 per link seems high.  Most ISPs complain about the $250 
 they pay now for CPEs.

 Jory Privett
 WCCS

 - Original Message - From: michael mulcay 
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 4:23 PM
 Subject: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless


 Guys,

 As we wireless operators know, the costs of licensed networks
 (equipment, antennas and licensing) makes providing services to the
 majority of subscribers prohibitively expensive, and the cost at 
 auction
 for spectrum (for WiMax and 4G products) is beyond the reach of most
of
 us.

 To overcome these problems, two years ago Wireless Strategies began
 research into ways to use new technologies -- WiMAX and smart
antennas
 -- to reuse side lobe radiation around sites of point-to-point 4GHz
and
 6GHz microwave links under the present FCC rules and without causing
 additional interference.

 Our finding is that networks can be designed to operate with smart
 antennas with distributed radiators and that the new paths can be
 concurrently coordinated, under existing FCC rules and without
causing
 additional interference.

 We believe that concurrent coordination will be The Next Big Thing
in
 Wireless, leveling the playing field by making it possible for 
 WISPs to
 obtain multipurpose licensed spectrum at pennies on the dollar
compared
 to obtaining it at auction. By making use of the formerly wasted
side
 lobe radiation of 4GHz and 6GHz paths, WISPs will be able to use
IEEE
 802.16-based (WiMAX) equipment with small antennas to provide
licensed
 broadband services to hundreds of additional subscribers at a
 provisioning cost of only about $500 per link. We appreciate that
some
 members of the industry may initially perceive any change to the
status
 quo as a threat, but we believe that concurrent coordination will
 provide extraordinary benefits to the entire industry, especially 
 WISPs.

 Due to the potential for unprecedented industry-wide changes from
the
 use of antennas with distributed radiators to provide multiple-path
 low-cost broadband services under the existing FCC rules, Wireless
 Strategies decided to remove any uncertainty for investors and
service
 providers by, on February 23, 2007, filing with the Federal
 Communications Commission, a Request for a Declaratory Ruling on
 Compliance of Fixed Microwave Antennas Having Distributed Radiating
 Elements.

 However, to date, the FCC has taken no action. We believe that 
 emails of
 support from the WISP community can help speed up the process, by
 encouraging the FCC to either issue the requested declaratory ruling
or
 to issue a Public Notice for industry comment.

 Therefore, if you would like a copy of our FCC filing and/or 
 information
 about the new concept of concurrent coordination, please contact me
at
 Wireless Strategies 831-659-5618 or [EMAIL PROTECTED] For
 additional information you can also visit our web site at
 www.wirelessstrategies.net.

 Thanks,

 Mike

 Michael Mulcay, CEO
 Wireless Strategies, Inc.

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Re: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless

2007-05-11 Thread Dawn DiPietro
After rereading Mike's post I realized I was mistaken and apologized to 
the list.


Grenier, Craig wrote:

I hear ya.  It sounds great.  Don't feed the trolls =D

Craig M. Grenier 
Production TAC Engineer 
Savvis, Inc.
e-mail: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Built to RespondTM 


This message contains information which may be confidential and/or
privileged.  Unless you are the intended recipient (or authorized to
receive for the intended recipient), you may not read, use, copy or
disclose to anyone the message or any information contained in the
message. If you have received the message in error, please advise the
sender by reply e-mail at [EMAIL PROTECTED] and delete the
message and any attachment(s) thereto without retaining any copies.


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of John Scrivner
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 7:01 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless

What do you mean? I have been talking to him for two months about this. 
Where did you get that this is an ad? I asked him to post this message 
to get a feel for how WISPs would respond. He even sent it to me for 
review prior to sending it out here. I guess I am having trouble 
understanding why this would be considered an ad. They are looking for 
support for a declaratory ruling from the FCC on this matter. Mike would


like to see WISPA help him on this and I think we should at least 
consider this.

Scriv


Dawn DiPietro wrote:

  

Sounds like an ad too. :-)


Jory Privett wrote:


Sounds like a great idea.  I only have one issue from what I read 
here, $500 per link seems high.  Most ISPs complain about the $250 
they pay now for CPEs.


Jory Privett
WCCS

- Original Message - From: michael mulcay 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 4:23 PM
Subject: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless


  

Guys,

As we wireless operators know, the costs of licensed networks
(equipment, antennas and licensing) makes providing services to the
majority of subscribers prohibitively expensive, and the cost at 
auction

for spectrum (for WiMax and 4G products) is beyond the reach of most


of
  

us.

To overcome these problems, two years ago Wireless Strategies began
research into ways to use new technologies -- WiMAX and smart


antennas
  

-- to reuse side lobe radiation around sites of point-to-point 4GHz


and
  

6GHz microwave links under the present FCC rules and without causing
additional interference.

Our finding is that networks can be designed to operate with smart
antennas with distributed radiators and that the new paths can be
concurrently coordinated, under existing FCC rules and without


causing
  

additional interference.

We believe that concurrent coordination will be The Next Big Thing


in
  
Wireless, leveling the playing field by making it possible for 
WISPs to

obtain multipurpose licensed spectrum at pennies on the dollar


compared
  

to obtaining it at auction. By making use of the formerly wasted


side
  

lobe radiation of 4GHz and 6GHz paths, WISPs will be able to use


IEEE
  

802.16-based (WiMAX) equipment with small antennas to provide


licensed
  

broadband services to hundreds of additional subscribers at a
provisioning cost of only about $500 per link. We appreciate that


some
  

members of the industry may initially perceive any change to the


status
  

quo as a threat, but we believe that concurrent coordination will
provide extraordinary benefits to the entire industry, especially 
WISPs.


Due to the potential for unprecedented industry-wide changes from


the
  

use of antennas with distributed radiators to provide multiple-path
low-cost broadband services under the existing FCC rules, Wireless
Strategies decided to remove any uncertainty for investors and


service
  

providers by, on February 23, 2007, filing with the Federal
Communications Commission, a Request for a Declaratory Ruling on
Compliance of Fixed Microwave Antennas Having Distributed Radiating
Elements.

However, to date, the FCC has taken no action. We believe that 
emails of

support from the WISP community can help speed up the process, by
encouraging the FCC to either issue the requested declaratory ruling


or
  

to issue a Public Notice for industry comment.

Therefore, if you would like a copy of our FCC filing and/or 
information

about the new concept of concurrent coordination, please contact me


at
  

Wireless Strategies 831-659-5618 or [EMAIL PROTECTED] For
additional information you can also visit our web site at
www.wirelessstrategies.net.

Thanks,

Mike

Michael Mulcay, CEO
Wireless Strategies, Inc.

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RE: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

2007-05-11 Thread Grenier, Craig
Verizon charges $45 USD a month for unlimited web access, using the
phone.  I told them where to stick it. :D

Craig M. Grenier 
Production TAC Engineer 
Savvis, Inc.
e-mail: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Built to RespondTM 

This message contains information which may be confidential and/or
privileged.  Unless you are the intended recipient (or authorized to
receive for the intended recipient), you may not read, use, copy or
disclose to anyone the message or any information contained in the
message. If you have received the message in error, please advise the
sender by reply e-mail at [EMAIL PROTECTED] and delete the
message and any attachment(s) thereto without retaining any copies.


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Pete Davis
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 7:09 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

The $10/mo for web access with Sprint ONLY applies to the use on the 
phone. When you plug in the data cable, and use it as a modem, its like 
$0.30/kb. Learning that lesson cost me.
The unlimited phone-as-a-modem or data card rate is around $39/mo.

Does anyone know if there are drivers/capabilities to link a data card 
to a Mikrotik or StarOS box? I guess that there are other Linux drivers 
out there, so my thinking may work.
I have considered for some time the possibilities of making a box to 
mount in my car (car-puter) with a Sprint (or Cingular, or Verizon, or 
whoever) cellular type data connection, with a WIFI client as the 
primary (or secondary) mode of connection. With DDNS, access to the dash

mounted camera, GPS stream, etc should be easy enough, making it a 
roll-your-own LowJack type system. Also, in the car, an ethernet jack to

plug a laptop into could be nice, as well as opening the possibilities 
to put in an ATA to make VOIP calls, as well as adding a WIFI AP. $39/mo

for unlimited data connectivity, especially if it gives the 
speed/latency required to do VOIP, seems like a bargain compared to 
$129/mo for 2000 minutes. I guess a Windows-based system could do all of

those things, but the RAM/processor/etc/boot time/bluescreens associated

with Windoze don't seem to make it conducive to this type of project,
IMO.

The car-puter installation plan things that I have read about seem to 
focus on GPS and MP3 playing. Since my wreck 6 yrs ago, where I couldn't

prove to the insurance company (5 eyewitnesses from every direction from

the intersection and a police report weren't good enough) that I had the

green light. I have been thinking about a car-mounted DVR with cameras 
in the grill, the dash, and in the back to offer video defense in a car 
accident claim. Showing the judge, the insurance agent, or whoever a DVD

of the video surveillance of the accident could save a lot of time and 
hassle.

What I wish someone would sell for a car (these things probably all 
exist in one form or another with various systems) is a computer that 
will act as a:
DVR security cam recorder (cam pointed at the driver seat to 
prosecute the car thief, + cams on bumpers to witness accidents)
Data port (ethernet + WIFI AP)
Web server (with DDNS support to access the stored data, even when 
the car is away from the house, like at an impound yard or after being 
stolen)
MP3 player
Realtime ODBII scanning/recording/diagnostics of the car.
VOIP system.
GPS stream recording. (to show he teenage driver when/how fast she 
was really driving)

I would think that these things could all be incorporated for under $2k,

mounted in the trunk, and it would be something that would sell like 
crazy for $3k installed.

I guess what I would like is a retail version of this with more
features:

http://www.popsci.com/popsci/how20/d04305f2dbbf1110vgnvcm104eecbccdr
crd.html

pd


Rich Comroe wrote:
 What a rip!  Sprint told me it's only $300-400 to get out of a Sprint 
 contract.  What's it cost to early terminate a Cingular contract?  Why

 doesn't he just terminate?  Getting a $1200 monthly bill is 
 ridiculous! UNLIMITED data to a Sprint windows phone is only about 
 $10/month, and there's no way to limit it to not operate tethered to a

 computer (other than unreasonably large download usage).  And it's 
 EVDO, so it blows away that measley 125 - 175 kbit.  I really think 
 those PCMCIA cards are a rip-off for service cost compared to just 
 getting unlimited data service to your cellphone.  I love ppc6700 
 windows phones ... a lot lighter and smaller than a laptop yet nearly 
 as capable.

 Rich

 - Original Message - From: Mike Hammett 
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 8:08 AM
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


 oh, I'm most certainly under $1200, even for a whole year.  :-p

 Anyone have experience getting out of a bad Cingular deal?


 -
 Mike Hammett
 Intelligent Computing Solutions
 http://www.ics-il.com


 - Original Message 

[WISPA] Re: Mirrored Switch

2007-05-11 Thread John Valenti

(reply to an older posting, I'm trying to catch up)

Matt,

I bought some Dell PowerConnect 2708 switches last fall. That is a  
smaller 8 port gig switch, it was the cheapest one I could find that  
did port mirroring.  About $82 now, go onto Dell's website as small  
business or the price might go up drastically (under the EDU section,  
it was about $100 more).


The 2708 is smaller, I wanted to mount it inside a box up a grain  
leg, so that was what I wanted. They have 16 and 24 port versions.  
All them come with ears for rack mounting. The 24 port one has two  
fiber ports.


I've had one installed at 140' for about two months now with no  
issues.  The other one is in my basement NOC, guess I'll need to move  
that to my other POP before CALEA kicks in.  (ugggh, this weekend!   
time flies...)


-
One concern I had with these is the temperature rating. Only goes  
down to 32 F. But the switches that were rated for colder were much  
more expensive and didn't do port mirroring until $300+.  But I've  
had Allied Telesys cheap switches that are also rated to 32 last thru  
the winter with no problems. (think we hit -20 in February)


That SMCGS24C-SMART that Ty Carter mentions also sounds interesting.
-John


On May 1, at 1:00 PM May 1, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




The basic parts you'll need are:
Linux based router or tap capabilities on the on you have.
OR a managed switch that will allow you to mirror a port.


Does anyone reccommend a good switch that supports this and is rack
mount?  Hopefully available at newegg.com.  Putting together a Linux
server is easy but my luck a good switch might be backordered when I
need it.


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Re: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless

2007-05-11 Thread Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181

I talked to Mike for quite a while the other day.

I think this idea warrants some discussion.

On the one hand, the idea that we can use the cheap, arguably underutilized 
6 gig band for licensed ptmp links has some draw for me.  It's also an idea 
that the FCC has already hinted at a year or three ago (SPTF maybe???).


On the other hand, any licensed bands seem to almost always wind up in the 
hands of people that don't deploy with it.  At least not broadband.


And, as our tower sites get ever more loaded with the access points needed 
to service customers, many of us will likely eventually move to licensed 
bands for backhaul.  It would be a shame to not have licensed ptp only 
spectrum available.  Well, it could easily become a shame


laters,
Marlon
(509) 982-2181
(408) 907-6910 (Vonage)Consulting services
42846865 (icq)WISP Operator since 1999!
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam



- Original Message - 
From: michael mulcay [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 2:23 PM
Subject: [WISPA] The Next Big Thing in Wireless



Guys,

As we wireless operators know, the costs of licensed networks
(equipment, antennas and licensing) makes providing services to the
majority of subscribers prohibitively expensive, and the cost at auction
for spectrum (for WiMax and 4G products) is beyond the reach of most of
us.

To overcome these problems, two years ago Wireless Strategies began
research into ways to use new technologies -- WiMAX and smart antennas
-- to reuse side lobe radiation around sites of point-to-point 4GHz and
6GHz microwave links under the present FCC rules and without causing
additional interference.

Our finding is that networks can be designed to operate with smart
antennas with distributed radiators and that the new paths can be
concurrently coordinated, under existing FCC rules and without causing
additional interference.

We believe that concurrent coordination will be The Next Big Thing in
Wireless, leveling the playing field by making it possible for WISPs to
obtain multipurpose licensed spectrum at pennies on the dollar compared
to obtaining it at auction. By making use of the formerly wasted side
lobe radiation of 4GHz and 6GHz paths, WISPs will be able to use IEEE
802.16-based (WiMAX) equipment with small antennas to provide licensed
broadband services to hundreds of additional subscribers at a
provisioning cost of only about $500 per link. We appreciate that some
members of the industry may initially perceive any change to the status
quo as a threat, but we believe that concurrent coordination will
provide extraordinary benefits to the entire industry, especially WISPs.

Due to the potential for unprecedented industry-wide changes from the
use of antennas with distributed radiators to provide multiple-path
low-cost broadband services under the existing FCC rules, Wireless
Strategies decided to remove any uncertainty for investors and service
providers by, on February 23, 2007, filing with the Federal
Communications Commission, a Request for a Declaratory Ruling on
Compliance of Fixed Microwave Antennas Having Distributed Radiating
Elements.

However, to date, the FCC has taken no action. We believe that emails of
support from the WISP community can help speed up the process, by
encouraging the FCC to either issue the requested declaratory ruling or
to issue a Public Notice for industry comment.

Therefore, if you would like a copy of our FCC filing and/or information
about the new concept of concurrent coordination, please contact me at
Wireless Strategies 831-659-5618 or [EMAIL PROTECTED] For
additional information you can also visit our web site at
www.wirelessstrategies.net.

Thanks,

Mike

Michael Mulcay, CEO
Wireless Strategies, Inc.

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Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

2007-05-11 Thread Rich Comroe
We ran Skype from our windows phones.  Why?  Just to see if it'd work as an 
internet app!   :-)  Worked fine.


Rich

- Original Message - 
From: Mike Hammett [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 7:38 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


Last I checked, 3G systems have horrible latency, therefore are not good 
for VoIP.



-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com


- Original Message - 
From: Pete Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 7:09 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


The $10/mo for web access with Sprint ONLY applies to the use on the 
phone. When you plug in the data cable, and use it as a modem, its like 
$0.30/kb. Learning that lesson cost me.

The unlimited phone-as-a-modem or data card rate is around $39/mo.

Does anyone know if there are drivers/capabilities to link a data card to 
a Mikrotik or StarOS box? I guess that there are other Linux drivers out 
there, so my thinking may work.
I have considered for some time the possibilities of making a box to 
mount in my car (car-puter) with a Sprint (or Cingular, or Verizon, or 
whoever) cellular type data connection, with a WIFI client as the primary 
(or secondary) mode of connection. With DDNS, access to the dash mounted 
camera, GPS stream, etc should be easy enough, making it a roll-your-own 
LowJack type system. Also, in the car, an ethernet jack to plug a laptop 
into could be nice, as well as opening the possibilities to put in an ATA 
to make VOIP calls, as well as adding a WIFI AP. $39/mo for unlimited 
data connectivity, especially if it gives the speed/latency required to 
do VOIP, seems like a bargain compared to $129/mo for 2000 minutes. I 
guess a Windows-based system could do all of those things, but the 
RAM/processor/etc/boot time/bluescreens associated with Windoze don't 
seem to make it conducive to this type of project, IMO.


The car-puter installation plan things that I have read about seem to 
focus on GPS and MP3 playing. Since my wreck 6 yrs ago, where I couldn't 
prove to the insurance company (5 eyewitnesses from every direction from 
the intersection and a police report weren't good enough) that I had the 
green light. I have been thinking about a car-mounted DVR with cameras in 
the grill, the dash, and in the back to offer video defense in a car 
accident claim. Showing the judge, the insurance agent, or whoever a DVD 
of the video surveillance of the accident could save a lot of time and 
hassle.


What I wish someone would sell for a car (these things probably all exist 
in one form or another with various systems) is a computer that will act 
as a:
   DVR security cam recorder (cam pointed at the driver seat to prosecute 
the car thief, + cams on bumpers to witness accidents)

   Data port (ethernet + WIFI AP)
   Web server (with DDNS support to access the stored data, even when the 
car is away from the house, like at an impound yard or after being 
stolen)

   MP3 player
   Realtime ODBII scanning/recording/diagnostics of the car.
   VOIP system.
   GPS stream recording. (to show he teenage driver when/how fast she was 
really driving)


I would think that these things could all be incorporated for under $2k, 
mounted in the trunk, and it would be something that would sell like 
crazy for $3k installed.


I guess what I would like is a retail version of this with more features:

http://www.popsci.com/popsci/how20/d04305f2dbbf1110vgnvcm104eecbccdrcrd.html

pd


Rich Comroe wrote:
What a rip!  Sprint told me it's only $300-400 to get out of a Sprint 
contract.  What's it cost to early terminate a Cingular contract?  Why 
doesn't he just terminate?  Getting a $1200 monthly bill is ridiculous! 
UNLIMITED data to a Sprint windows phone is only about $10/month, and 
there's no way to limit it to not operate tethered to a computer (other 
than unreasonably large download usage).  And it's EVDO, so it blows 
away that measley 125 - 175 kbit.  I really think those PCMCIA cards are 
a rip-off for service cost compared to just getting unlimited data 
service to your cellphone.  I love ppc6700 windows phones ... a lot 
lighter and smaller than a laptop yet nearly as capable.


Rich

- Original Message - From: Mike Hammett 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 8:08 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular



oh, I'm most certainly under $1200, even for a whole year.  :-p

Anyone have experience getting out of a bad Cingular deal?


-
Mike Hammett
Intelligent Computing Solutions
http://www.ics-il.com


- Original Message - From: Scott Reed [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2007 7:48 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


Even if he can't get out of the Cingular contract, I would think 
paying you your 

Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular

2007-05-11 Thread Rich Comroe


- Original Message - 
From: Pete Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 7:09 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Try it out vs. Cingular


The $10/mo for web access with Sprint ONLY applies to the use on the 
phone. When you plug in the data cable, and use it as a modem, its like 
$0.30/kb. Learning that lesson cost me.

The unlimited phone-as-a-modem or data card rate is around $39/mo.

On a windows phone, an operator shouldn't be able to tell if a byte of data 
sent to the phone is passed onto a tethered PC.  Sprint tries to control the 
software on their phones so that they can (if you obtain windows from Sprint 
they pre-install a set of their own Sprint patches [and remove key windows 
networking components]  they only offer a several versions old version of 
windows).  On every computer I own the first thing I do is dump the 
distributor supplied pre-installed OS and put on a clean installation 
(distributors pre-install so much crap software).  But you're free to run 
any version of Microsoft Windows Mobile you want.  It's impossible for an 
operator to control the version of windows that a user may run.  There's 
open source bootloaders to install any version of windows mobile that's 
compatible with your phone.


On non-windows phones, there's an embedded phone feature that uses a 
different NIC value when a tethered PC establishes a data-session from a 
tethered device.  I've seen instructions on the internet for turning off 
this phone feature in phones (that changes the NIC value), making any byte 
of data fetched for an external data session indistinguishable from data 
sessions from the phone.  Sprint keeps a BW tally for all data sessions, but 
the trigger that someone without an unlimited external data subscription is 
based on extreme download quantities.  I used to occasionally use my 
previous java phone tethered to my laptop without issue.  But with a windows 
phone I now seldom lug a laptop around anymore as the phone is so 
full-featured.


Does anyone know if there are drivers/capabilities to link a data card to 
a Mikrotik or StarOS box? I guess that there are other Linux drivers out 
there, so my thinking may work.
I have considered for some time the possibilities of making a box to mount 
in my car (car-puter) with a Sprint (or Cingular, or Verizon, or whoever) 
cellular type data connection, with a WIFI client as the primary (or 
secondary) mode of connection. With DDNS, access to the dash mounted 
camera, GPS stream, etc should be easy enough, making it a roll-your-own 
LowJack type system. Also, in the car, an ethernet jack to plug a laptop 
into could be nice, as well as opening the possibilities to put in an ATA 
to make VOIP calls, as well as adding a WIFI AP. $39/mo for unlimited data 
connectivity, especially if it gives the speed/latency required to do 
VOIP, seems like a bargain compared to $129/mo for 2000 minutes. I guess a 
Windows-based system could do all of those things, but the 
RAM/processor/etc/boot time/bluescreens associated with Windoze don't seem 
to make it conducive to this type of project, IMO.





I've seen some home-built's on the Internet (there's a public project kit). 
They're pretty cool.  But the latest windows mobile running on any standard 
bluetooth or wifi capable windows phone can do this.  My phone can do this 
... no extra cost ... no extra hardware.  I wouldn't leave it in the car, 
but it certainly can make a hot-spot in my bluetooth or wifi radius for 
other computers using windows ICS.  If one wanted a permenant installation, 
by all means build the public project.  While writing this I don't recall 
the URL, but if you're interested it wasn't hard to find.  I suspect you've 
already seen the public projects.  All someone needs to form a business is 
to build  sell these (if someone isn't doing it already!).


The car-puter installation plan things that I have read about seem to 
focus on GPS and MP3 playing.


Maybe you haven't seen the public project I saw.  The one I've seen focuses 
on a car wi-fi hotspot.  Look for stompbox.  Try 
http://www.stompboxnetworks.com/index.html


Since my wreck 6 yrs ago, where I couldn't prove to the insurance company 
(5 eyewitnesses from every direction from the intersection and a police 
report weren't good enough) that I had the green light. I have been 
thinking about a car-mounted DVR with cameras in the grill, the dash, and 
in the back to offer video defense in a car accident claim. Showing the 
judge, the insurance agent, or whoever a DVD of the video surveillance of 
the accident could save a lot of time and hassle.


What I wish someone would sell for a car (these things probably all exist 
in one form or another with various systems) is a computer that will act 
as a:
   DVR security cam recorder (cam pointed at the driver seat to prosecute 
the car thief, + cams on bumpers to witness accidents)

   Data port (ethernet + WIFI AP)
   Web 

Re: [WISPA] Re: Mirrored Switch

2007-05-11 Thread David E. Smith
John Valenti wrote:

 One concern I had with these is the temperature rating. Only goes down
 to 32 F. But the switches that were rated for colder were much more
 expensive and didn't do port mirroring until $300+.  But I've had Allied
 Telesys cheap switches that are also rated to 32 last thru the winter
 with no problems. (think we hit -20 in February)

You usually get a big of flexibility with temperature, in outdoor
enclosures. In ours, we usually have a router or two, the access point
we're using, a switch, and a UPS, and the power bricks for all of the
above. Every one of those widgets will put out a bit of heat, which
combined will keep the ambient temperature in your nice snug sealed box
a bit warmer than the outside.

You could go really overboard and put a bit of insulation in there, as
long as you remember to take it back out in the spring (so your gear
doesn't cook itself in the hot summer).

Most of our switches are cheap unmanaged twenty-dollar ones, only rated
for indoor use, and they've survived our last couple winters (we've had
temperatures below zero a couple times) and summers (we regularly break
100 F) just fine.

The only thing I can recall, in my network, ever having problems with
temperature is an old Orinoco PCMCIA card that froze up (har har) when
we had wind chills of about 30 below.

David Smith
MVN.net
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[WISPA] Mea Culpa

2007-05-11 Thread Michael Erskine (804) 436-9428
I owe everyone on this list a clarification and an apology because I 
provoked Peter to anger.


There are those who believe that getting the person you are debating 
with to become angry somehow makes a point.  I am not one of those 
people and the only way to prove that is to apologize to him in the same 
forum where I offended him.


Peter, I did not intend to provoke you and I am sorry that I did. 
Personally I was not offended by your language and never even noticed it 
until I made a similar mistake on another list and started reviewing posts.


To those of you on this list, I am sorry that I disrupted the list and 
I'll be more careful in the future.


Special thanks to Rick who does such an excellent and thankless job of 
moderating the lists.


Michael Erskine
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[WISPA] Radio / antenna combo

2007-05-11 Thread Mark McElvy
I am trying to understand if it is better to high gain antenna / lower
power radio or low gain antenna / higher power radio.

Either combo can get you to max EIRP but it seems the lower gain antenna
give you better coverage through greater vertical beam width. Am I
thinking right?

 

Mark McElvy



 

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RE: [WISPA] Radio / antenna combo

2007-05-11 Thread Mac Dearman
The lower the gain antenna (less narrow - or wider beam width) the more
broad the path it makes. The tighter (higher gain) the beam width of the
antenna the more condensed it is or less area it will cover as it is more
focused to achieve the extra gain in dbi.

 This is one of those things that you will have to figure out for each new
POP you install - as to what coverage you want for the selected area. 

You are correct in stating that each of the examples you gave will lead you
to max EIRP allowed by the FCC, but they are two totally different critters
when you get them built out.

Mac Dearman
Maximum Access, LLC.
Rayville, La.
www.inetsouth.com
www.radioresponse.org (Katrina relief)
www.mac-tel.us (VoIP sales)
318.728.8600
318.728.9600
318.303.4182



 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
 Behalf Of Mark McElvy
 Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 12:28 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Radio / antenna combo
 
 I am trying to understand if it is better to high gain antenna / lower
 power radio or low gain antenna / higher power radio.
 
 Either combo can get you to max EIRP but it seems the lower gain antenna
 give you better coverage through greater vertical beam width. Am I
 thinking right?
 
 
 
 Mark McElvy
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] Radio / antenna combo

2007-05-11 Thread Lonnie Nunweiler

It depends what you wish to accomplish.  They both seem to provide the
same result but it is the side effects that are most important.

The ultimate in high power radios low gain antenna is the omni combo.
This combo sprays power in all directions and gathers signal from all
directions.  This means that you are sending your signal in areas that
you might not want and thus creating reuse problems.  It also means
your receiver is seeing your other AP signals thus you have a lower
receive level (due to low gain omni) and you have more noise from
other directions.  Reducing the 360 beamwidth to 180 gives a 3 dB drop
in noise.  Moving to a 90 degree sector gives you 6 dB better noise
levels, and will usually have about 5 dB or more better signal.  This
translates to a SNR gain of about 11 dB over an omni, assuming normal
noise situations.  As anybody knows. wireless quality is ALL about
SNR.

The really big thing is the high power levels you spray with the low
gain antenna high power radios. Also, as anybody knows, wireless is
all about interference and if you spray signals where you do not need
them, then you are creating interference.

P2P is something you should use a large antenna for and turn down your
power to keep signals in the -60 dB range. We use 2 foot solid dishes
for shots to 15 miles and 3 foot for shots to 50 miles.

We use 60 degree 16 dB sectors for our 2.4 GHz AP units.  I am totally
pleased with the results and we have great -70 dB signals to 5 miles
using 14 dB Rootennas, and a few customers at 12 miles with 24 dB
grids with -72 dB readings.

For Non LOS we use 900 MHZ and 9 dB yagis for both ends.  They make a
great AP unit and for customers they are nice and small and do not get
in your face.  If we need more power we get the 13 dB yagi but they
become a 5 foot monster and you definitely see them.  They work great
and when presented with dialup or 5 foot yagi they make the right
choice.

To obtain LOS you need to remove the problem or go over or around it.
The only thing I have ever seen a tree hugger dig out the chainsaw for
is wireless.  They are so tired of dialup that you hear trees crashing
15 minutes after you point out the ones that are causing trouble.

Lonnie

On 5/11/07, Mark McElvy [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

I am trying to understand if it is better to high gain antenna / lower
power radio or low gain antenna / higher power radio.

Either combo can get you to max EIRP but it seems the lower gain antenna
give you better coverage through greater vertical beam width. Am I
thinking right?



Mark McElvy





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Lonnie Nunweiler
Valemount Networks Corporation
http://www.star-os.com/
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[WISPA] Qwest as Upstream

2007-05-11 Thread Jason

Gang,

   Anyone using Qwest as an upstream?  Care to share the in/outs and 
your experiences?  Off-list is OK.


Jason
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[WISPA] Re: [isp-wireless] A call for open spectrum

2007-05-11 Thread Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181

Hmm

Do we have a real, honest to goodness push to get more unlicensed out there?

I know that there will be TV whitespaces, but what about all of the other 
bands?


Marlon
(509) 982-2181
(408) 907-6910 (Vonage)Consulting services
42846865 (icq)WISP Operator since 1999!
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam



- Original Message - 
From: Alex Goldman [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2007 8:12 AM
Subject: [isp-wireless] A call for open spectrum


For company reasons, you will almost never see me post a link to ZDNet. 
But

Dana Blankenhorn has been covering this industry for as long as anyone I
know and he's taking a strong stand, one that might be professionally 
risky

too, for him:



http://blogs.zdnet.com/open-source/?p=1041

This plan will be fought tooth-and-nail by Verizon and ATT, and they 
fight

dirty.



** ISPCON SPRING 2007 - May 23-25 - Orlando, FL  www.ispcon.com **

** THE INTERNET INDUSTRY EVENT **

** Get strategic about your wireless network. ISPCON will show you how. **

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[WISPA] InterOp/Broadband Wireless World Forum?

2007-05-11 Thread Patrick Leary
I will be attending (though Alvarion is not exhibiting). If you would
like to meet up with me to discuss anything or just to catch up, please
send me an offlist invitation. I will be there from the early afternoon
of the 22nd to the early morning of the 24th, staying at the Planet
Hollywood Hotel  Casino.

I look forward to catching up with folks if time and schedules allow.

Kind regards,

Patrick Leary
AVP WISP Markets
Alvarion, Inc.
o: 650.314.2628
c: 760.580.0080
Vonage: 650.641.1243
[EMAIL PROTECTED]





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Mail-SeCure for the presence of malicious code, vandals  computer viruses(84). 









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[WISPA] Mikrotik or StarOS 5gig AP Pix

2007-05-11 Thread Smith, Rick
I wish I had taken more pictures through my career as a WISP.
 
Does anyone have a picture of a Mikrotik setup on a rooftop with a
sector, or even omni ?
 
I need a clean install pic of a small setup like that, for a potential
landlord deal here on 5 buildings...
 
We'll be installing a wireless backbone for this company, and using 5 of
their rooftops.
 
No more than 1/4 mile between each of them, and signal level shouldn't
be much of a problem, so I was planning on using a sector to cover two
of the locations and an omni to cover the others.
 
If anyone has any pix of such setups, let me know.
 
R
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Re: [WISPA] Qwest as Upstream

2007-05-11 Thread Scott Reed

Qwest T-1 from Bandwidth.com.
No complaints.  Bandwidth is responsive and easy to work with.  They 
handle all the Qwest and Verizon (last mile) issues.


Jason wrote:

Gang,

   Anyone using Qwest as an upstream?  Care to share the in/outs and 
your experiences?  Off-list is OK.


Jason


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Owner
NewWays
Wireless Networking
Network Design, Installation and Administration
www.nwwnet.net

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[WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email

2007-05-11 Thread Doug Ratcliffe
Currently we do in-house email.  We always have one problem or another with
our old IMail server ,plus dealing with a spam server and antivirus... We
have about 15 domains we currently host, about 150 users.  Is it cost
effective to outsource something this small?  Also on a similar note, does
anyone know of a free Exchange host out there that will download pop3 mail
and Direct Push to my mobile phone?

Thanks

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Re: [WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email

2007-05-11 Thread W.D.McKinney
We don't use Exchane even though it's powerful, way to many holes for the wrong 
folks. But run a better verion of MTA that has all the bells and whistles. 
Lot's of users around the globe.

Hit me up off-list if you want more info.
-Dee

Alaska Wireless Systems
1(907)240-2183 Cell
1(907)349-2226 Fax
1(907)349-4308 Office
www.akwireless.net



- Original Message -
From: Doug Ratcliffe
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Fri, 11 May 2007 14:12:41 -0800
Subject:
[WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email


 Currently we do in-house email.  We always have one problem or another with
 our old IMail server ,plus dealing with a spam server and antivirus... We
 have about 15 domains we currently host, about 150 users.  Is it cost
 effective to outsource something this small?  Also on a similar note, does
 anyone know of a free Exchange host out there that will download pop3 mail
 and Direct Push to my mobile phone?
 
 Thanks
 
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Re: [WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email

2007-05-11 Thread Frank Muto
You may want to look into IMAP for mobile communications. We have a 3-way 
bundle we are officially launching at ISPCON that provides IMAP, POP3 and 
Web Mail. You can use one or all of the services for one price. If you are 
there, check us out or give me a shout directly.




Frank Muto
President
FSM Marketing Group, Inc
Postini Partner
www.SecureEmailPlus.com

ISPCON Spring 2007
May 23-25 in Orlando, FL.
LaunchPad Pavilion J

WISPA Sponsoring Vendor








- Original Message - 
From: Doug Ratcliffe [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 6:12 PM
Subject: [WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email


Currently we do in-house email.  We always have one problem or another 
with

our old IMail server ,plus dealing with a spam server and antivirus... We
have about 15 domains we currently host, about 150 users.  Is it cost
effective to outsource something this small?  Also on a similar note, does
anyone know of a free Exchange host out there that will download pop3 mail
and Direct Push to my mobile phone?



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Re: [WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email

2007-05-11 Thread JohnnyO
www.datapipe.com - you'll pay about $79.99/mo for unlimited domains and 
email addresses.


I will more then likely offend a few people here but I've asked several 
people here that have their own Barracuda's for quotes and noone can seem to 
touch the price I have been paying for 7+ yrs. I suppose their costs are 
much higher and are trying to recoup it on a low volume as opposed to the 
larger mail / hosting outfits.


Datapipe uses the Iron Port appliance and they also ANSWER their phone 
24/7/365... You get a live person, not some automated system and I actually 
called them this past year on Christmas with an issue I had with a domain.


Hit me up off-list if you want more information or input concerning this.

Regards,

JohnnyO
- Original Message - 
From: Doug Ratcliffe [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, May 11, 2007 5:12 PM
Subject: [WISPA] Outsourced vs in-house email


Currently we do in-house email.  We always have one problem or another 
with

our old IMail server ,plus dealing with a spam server and antivirus... We
have about 15 domains we currently host, about 150 users.  Is it cost
effective to outsource something this small?  Also on a similar note, does
anyone know of a free Exchange host out there that will download pop3 mail
and Direct Push to my mobile phone?

Thanks

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Re: [WISPA] Qwest as Upstream

2007-05-11 Thread Sam Tetherow

Dittos, but a DS3 via Bandwidth.com

Scott Reed wrote:

Qwest T-1 from Bandwidth.com.
No complaints.  Bandwidth is responsive and easy to work with.  They 
handle all the Qwest and Verizon (last mile) issues.


Jason wrote:

Gang,

   Anyone using Qwest as an upstream?  Care to share the in/outs and 
your experiences?  Off-list is OK.


Jason




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