[WISPA] SavetheInternet.com -- sneak peek:

2006-04-21 Thread Sascha Meinrath

Hi everyone,

SaveTheInternet.com is launching Monday (more info below) and I would encourage 
ISPs to sign on to the coalition -- especially since it's our networks that are 
going to be the first folks discriminated against if network neutrality gets 
completely dumped (Brand X being only the beginning).  You can sign up here:


http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?u=675152044966

It takes about 60 seconds.

--Sascha

***

More info on the coalition:

SavetheInternet.com Coalition Statement of Principles

We believe that the Internet is a crucial engine for economic growth and 
democratic discourse. We urge Congress to take steps now to preserve network 
neutrality, a guiding principle of the Internet, and to ensure that the Internet 
remains open to innovation and progress.


Network neutrality is the Internet’s First Amendment. Without it, the Internet 
is at risk of losing the openness and accessibility that has revolutionized 
democratic participation, economic innovation and free speech.


From its beginnings, the Internet was built on a cooperative, democratic ideal. 
It has leveled the playing field for all comers. Everyday people can have their 
voices heard by thousands, even millions of people. Network neutrality has 
prevented gatekeepers from blocking or discriminating against new economic, 
political and social ideas.


The major telecommunications legislation now under consideration in Congress 
must include meaningful and enforceable network neutrality requirements to keep 
the Internet free and open to all.


Here are some of the Web site’s features:

* Statement of Principles:
   http://www.savetheinternet.com/=principles

* The SavetheInternet.com Blog: http://www.savetheinternet.com/blog/
  Featuring regular updates and commentary on the state of the
  campaign. The blog is also a tool for feedback and discussion from
  activists and organizers.

* The Coalition Profile: http://www.savetheinternet.com/=coalition
  Keeping tabs on our growing numbers

* F.A.Q.: http://www.savetheinternet.com/=faq
  Untangling often complex issues of network neutrality

* Press: http://www.savetheinternet.com/=press
  Gallery of Coalition press releases and coverage

* Action: http://action.freepress.net/campaign/savethenet
  Petition to Congress

* Map: http://www.savetheinternet.com/=map
  An interactive guide to tracking House Commerce Committee votes
  and calling Representatives.

* Coalition Sign Up: *Tell other organizations to join the
  Coalition at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?u=675152044966

At the moment we’re more than 40 organizations. We expect this number to
increase in size and scope before we officially “launch” the Coalition
during a Monday press event.

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Sascha Meinrath
Policy Analyst*  Project Coordinator  *  President
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www.freepress.net *  www.cuwireless.net   *  www.acornactivemedia.com
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[WISPA] WISP/Muni Partnerships:

2006-04-24 Thread Sascha Meinrath

Matt Larsen Wrote:
 Every WISPA member should be watching their area diligently for
 muniwireless opportunities in their area, and working hard to get in on
 the ground floor...WISPs should be taking a proactive, positive stance toward 
 muniwireless efforts.   The munis are our most powerful allies right now, and 
 we should be working WITH them, not against them.


Hear, hear!  I'm relatively agnostic about who provides the network 
infrastructure, I just want to see the best services for end-users.  And 
sometimes that means private organizations, and sometimes that means municipal 
owners, and often it means public-private partnerships.  What's really important 
is that we be proactive in getting our foot in the door when municipal networks 
are on the table -- because there's a natural synergy that we could be tapping 
into that would benefit us greatly.


--Sascha

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[WISPA] Durbin Bill Follow-Up.

2006-08-09 Thread Sascha Meinrath

Hi all,

When I met with Durbin's staff at the end of July, we talked a lot about 
provisions 1  3 that are now in the bill.  However, I've also just learned that 
there may be a poison pill in the bill that makes unlicensed use of the TV 
broadcast spectrum illegal (which is also something that me and a lot of other 
folks have been working on for quite some time), which would change my take on 
the bill rather dramatically.


I'm following up with Durbin's folks this week, so if there's any message/info I 
should pass along, just let me know,


--Sascha

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[WISPA] CUWiN Releases CUWiNware 0.7.0

2006-09-21 Thread Sascha Meinrath

From Team CUWiN: (more info at www.cuwin.net)

CUWiN Releases CUWiNware 0.7.0 -- BETA.

September 19, 2006

CUWiN announces a new version of its flagship software, CUWiNware 0.7.0.
CUWiNware enables neighbors and communities to create a mesh wireless network
that can share Internet connections, establish local VoIP services, and utilize
peer-to-peer connections to improve their broadband experience. CUWiNware 0.7.0
makes community networking easier to use than ever before. CUWiNware is free
open source software, which makes network deployment as much as 75% cheaper than 
proprietary systems.


CUWiNware version 0.7.0 makes great strides forward in usability and
reliability. Dual radio support is the most visible addition to CUWiNware,
allowing a single node to provide a public access point in addition to providing
network infrastructure. Network traffic is handled more reliably. It also makes
gateway configuration more robust. Logging synchronization simplifies network
administration, in addition to a test version of a web-based configuration tool.
CUWiNware 0.7.0 also supports more diverse hardware.

“The effect of version 0.7.0 will soon be felt in the local Champaign-Urbana
community, as the City of Urbana converts their current nodes into dual-radio
nodes, providing free wireless Internet hotspots in places like Crane Alley, the
Market on the Square, and Lincoln Square Mall,” said CUWiN Outreach Coordinator
Ross Musselman. “This release brings us another step closer to the kind of
networks we envision: user owned and operated broadband networks.”

For the technical community, CUWiNware 0.7.0 marks a major step forward in
community wireless networking:

   * Dual radio allows a single node to act both as backhaul for the
 network and as an access point for public use.

   * Improved routing fidelity and routing daemon reliability,
 implements a more robust DHCPselect feature for gateway
 auto-configuration,

   * Syncing of HSLS daemon logs with Zebra logs for better debugging,

   * Non-i386 architectures support, including nascent support for the
 Atheros AR5312.

   * NodeConfig, a web-based graphical user interface that allows the
 user to change the node's settings through a web browser. Version
 0.7.0 contains a beta version of this feature, which can be
 accessed by typing the IP of the node into one's browser.

Release Notes:

CUWiNware Version 0.7.0 was released on September 19, 2006.

CUWiN’s three-part mission is to:
 - Connect more people to Internet and broadband services;
 - Develop open-source software for use by wireless projects world-wide;
 - Build  support community not-for-profit broadband networks worldwide.

For more information, contact:

Ross Musselman, CUWiN Outreach Coordinator
Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Tel: +1 217 278-3933 x.30



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Sascha Meinrath
Executive Director  *  Principal  *  President
CUWiN  *** The Ethos Group   *** Acorn Active Media
CUWireless.Net  *  EthosWireless.com  *  AcornActiveMedia.com

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[WISPA] [Fwd: Re: Wireless industry slams NAB's white space 'misinformation']

2008-01-18 Thread Sascha Meinrath
Hi everyone,

 Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2008 22:26:54 -0800
 From: Marlon K. Schafer [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Wireless industry slams NAB's white space
 'misinformation'
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Cc: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 I've sent a note to WIA and asked if they'd be interested in a discussion
 focused on finding common ground between them and us.

 It's my belief that WISPA needs to fight tooth and nail to keep personal
 portable devices out of the whitespaces band.  At least at first (really
 forever as far as I'm concerned).

 Anyone have a problem with that as a firm stance?
 marlon

I'm all for firm stands, but not for self-destructive ones.  Having been working
on white space devices since 2004 and been here in DC working daily on the issue
since last August, I can tell you that what Marlon is proposing would play
directly into the hands of the same telcos that would love to eliminate
competition from folks like independent WISPs.

NAB doesn't want _any_ unlicensed devices -- whether portable or fixed --
they're interested solely in a) no access to this spectrum and b) licensed
access if the first notion fails.  If you jettison unlicensed portable devices
you will lose the political support of both the industry players as well as the
public interest community working to open this spectrum.  At which point you'll
have WISPA fighting against NAB (who'll then go to the telcos and say Hey, you
can have regional and/or national spectrum access if you join our side).
Unlicensed portable WSDs might not be the optimal solution for WISPA (though I
think that's debatable), but access to this spectrum would be a huge boon to
WISPs across the country.  What's being proposed would put WISPA on the wrong
side of this battle, hurt our chances to get _any_ access to the spectrum, and
may inadvertently end up harming WISPA members.

This is an incredibly complex political issue; more importantly, WSDs are built
to be spectrum-aware, which means that a lot of the messiness we've seen in
802.11 will be alleviated -- keep in mind we're also talking about a huge swath
a spectrum with propagation characteristics that are quite different from 2.4
and 5GHz.  I'm just worried that WISPA is about to weigh in on something without
doing the necessary due diligence to know the ramifications of these actions.
In the meantime, I would encourage folks who are interested in learning about
WSDs to read New America Foundation's policy backgrounder:

http://www.newamerica.net/files/WhiteSpaceDevicesBackgrounder120607.pdf

In solidarity,

--Sascha






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Re: [WISPA] Philadelphia's municipal WiFi network to go dark

2008-05-14 Thread Sascha Meinrath
  Date: Wed, 14 May 2008 09:43:28 -0500
  From: Brad Belton [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  Subject: Re: [WISPA] Philadelphia's municipal WiFi network to go dark
  To: 'WISPA General List' wireless@wispa.org
 
  Damn, there goes any hope for free water service too...
 
  grin
 
  Brad

Don't forget, Philly was a for-fee service -- so the correct retort would be, 
Damn, there goes any hope for paid water service too...  ;)

--Sascha



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[WISPA] International Summit for Community Wireless Networks (May 18-20, 2007, Washington, DC): CALL FOR PANELS.

2007-04-06 Thread Sascha Meinrath
We're finishing up the program -- so please get panel ideas in quick!

--Sascha

*** PLEASE FORWARD ***

CALL FOR PANELS -- Due May 1, 2007
International Summit for Community Wireless Networks
May 18-20, 2007, Washington, DC
Send panel proposals and questions to: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Register now online: http://www.cuwin.net/summit/registration

Since the first National Summit for Community Wireless Networks in 2004,
hundreds of community Internet and municipal broadband projects have sprung up
in the United States and around the globe.  Broadband access is increasingly
important to all facets of civil society, but many communities are being left
out of this communications revolution. High-speed broadband access is the
electricity of the 21st century, yet many rural and poorer urban communities are
being left off the grid, says Ben Scott, policy director of Free Press, a
DC-based policy think-tank. The innovators and organizers at the International
Summit for Community Wireless Networks are blazing the trail to make broadband
affordable and available to everyone.

The Community Wireless Networking (CWN) movement has evolved since its
beginnings in the 1990s.  Although it has made impressive strides in the area of
developing autonomous mesh networks, the larger success of the CWN movement has
been the encouragement of citizens, small businesses, and local governments to
get involved in local telecom infrastructure as important stakeholders.  More
than ever we are taking hands-on approaches to ensure that our communities have
the telecommunications infrastructure necessary for an inclusive, dynamic and
socially just future.  Although there is still a focus on the wireless, CWN's
have served as rallying points for local movements for advocacy of the local
public interest of telecom infrastructure.  Wireless networking is about far
more than Internet connectivity, states Sascha Meinrath, Summit Director.
It's about building next-generation multi-media services for communities,
fostering economic justice, and facilitating a vibrant arts and cultural scene.

This year, Summit organizers are focused on the social and economic justice
aspects of wireless technologies and the impacts of community broadband on civil
societies worldwide.  With this in mind, the Champaign-Urbana Community Wireless
Network (CUWiN) and the Center for Community Informatics (CCI) are hosting the
International Summit for Community Wireless Networks from May 18-20, 2007 at
Loyola College in Columbia, Maryland and are looking for panel ideas from
throughout the wireless community to flesh out the Summit program.

The Summit focuses on how wireless networks can better serve their target
populations, the policies needed to support broader deployment of community
wireless systems, and the latest technological and software innovations in the
field.  We invite your submission and participation in this year's International
Summit for Community Wireless Networks to discuss and exchange ideas on how to
make universal broadband access a reality.  More information is available at:
http://www.wirelesssummit.org

The Summit serves as a space were citizens, creators of technologies,
businesspeople, policy advocates can gather to learn from one another and
develop new ideas on how to support telecommunications infrastructures that
serve the needs of communities.  Please join us in Washington, DC, May 18-20,
2007.  Register now at: http://www.cuwin.net/summit/registration

CALL FOR PANELS:

Interested presenters are encouraged to propose innovative panels focusing on
the three themes for the Summit: technology, policy, and implementation.  The
International Summit for Community Wireless Networks distinguishes itself from
typical technical and academic conferences by engaging all participants in an
ongoing dialog that encourages a strategic approach to community wireless
network development and telecommunications policy reform. Panelists will not
simply present their own work and opinions -- they will also serve as
facilitators of a process that records lessons learned and help produce a
comprehensive to-do list of action items for the coming months and years.
While three days is not long enough to develop a truly comprehensive strategic
plan, panels at the Summit represent a significant opportunity for thinkers,
developers, and stakeholders to produce substantial recommendations to support
the development of community wireless networks. The Summit is, in essence, a
gathering of leaders in the field and an opportunity to shape the future of this
movement.  Past panels can be reviewed at:
http://www.cuwin.net/2006summit/2006schedule

Panel ideas will be accepted on a rolling basis and must be received no later
than May 1, 2007.  Please send panel proposals and questions to: [EMAIL 
PROTECTED]

Travel stipends are available for speakers with financial need.

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[WISPA] Community Wireless Summit May 18-20, 2007 -- Washington, DC.

2007-04-23 Thread Sascha Meinrath
FYI:

Contact:
Sascha Meinrath
Executive Director
CUWiN Foundation
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
217-278-3933 x31

INTERNATIONAL SUMMIT TO ADDRESS FUTURE OF BROADBAND
-- Community Technology Leaders from Six Continents to Participate --

Champaign-Urbana, I.L., April 18 -- The CUWiN Foundation and the Center for
Community Informatics (CCI) will host the International Summit for Community
Wireless Networks (http://WirelessSummit.org) from May 18-20, 2007 at Loyola
College in Columbia, Maryland.

The summit is the largest gathering of wireless network developers, technology
and policy experts, and community organizers working to build universal,
low-cost broadband networks around the world. We are proud to host an event
that brings together technologists and activists committed to universal access
to informatics, said Marco Figueiredo, CCI Director.

The International Summit for Community Wireless Networks explores the
opportunities and challenges facing the growing movement to build community and
municipal broadband networks, said Sascha Meinrath, co-founder and Executive
Director of CUWiN. This event showcases cutting-edge technologies and develops
political strategies to increase digital inclusion.

Since the first National Summit for Community Wireless Networks in 2004, over
300 Community Internet and municipal broadband projects have sprung up in the
United States alone. The Summit will focus on how these networks can better
serve their target populations, the policies needed to support broader
deployment of community wireless systems, and the latest technological and
software innovations.

Presenters at previous summits have included FCC Commissioner Jonathan
Adelstein, Jim Baller of the Baller Herbst Law Group, Annie Collins of Fiber for
Our Future, Mark Cooper of the Consumer Federation of America, Harold Feld of
Media Access Project, Robert W. McChesney of Free Press, Matt Rantanen of Tribal
Digital Village, Greg Richardson of Civitium LLC, Paul Smith of the Center for
Neighborhood Technologies, Jim Snider of the New America Foundation, Dana
Spiegel of NYCwireless, Esme Vos of Muniwireless.com and many other luminaries.

High-speed broadband access is the electricity of the 21st century, yet many
rural and poorer urban communities are being left off the grid, said Ben Scott,
policy director of Free Press, the DC-based policy think-tank. The innovators
and organizers at the International Summit for Community Wireless Networks are
blazing the trail to make broadband affordable and available to everyone.

About CUWiN (http://www.cuwin.net)
The CUWiN Foundation is a world-renowned coalition of wireless developers and
community volunteers committed to providing low-cost, do-it-yourself,
community-controlled alternatives to contemporary broadband models. CUWiN is
fiscally sponsored by Grassroots.org, a non-profit 501c3.  CUWiN's mission is to
develop decentralized, community-owned networks that foster democratic cultures
and local content. Through advocacy and through our commitment to open source
technology, CUWiN supports organic networks that grow to meet the needs of their
communities.

About CCI (http://cci.cs.loyola.edu)
The Center for Community Informatics engages Loyola College’s students, faculty
and staff in supporting the creation and deployment of informatics tools for
community empowerment.  CCI develops the Community Telecenter Free Software
Toolset; promotes awareness events for the Loyola College community; offer
courses in Community Informatics; promotes Digital Inclusion Conferences;
researches and develops human-friendly technologies to facilitate inclusion in
the New Society of Knowledge; and, evaluates, documents and develops sustainable
models for Universal Access to Informatics.

# # #


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[WISPA] Unlicensed Devices in the TV Bands (was: FCC Says White-Space Spectrum Device Doesn't Work)

2007-08-09 Thread Sascha Meinrath
Hi all,

If one reads through the actual FCC report findings, you'll see that unlicensed
devices in the TV bands are not just workable, but that the data the FCC itself
collected supports the view that they're a viable technology.  Keep in mind that
these devices are 1st generation prototypes.  Meanwhile, here's some food for
thought:

First, let me just say that the Microsoft prototype sucked -- there's no other
way around that one -- it doesn't perform even close to spec and fails miserably
on just about every single benchmark that was tested.  I find it hard to believe
that the device was performing as engineered, but then again, Microsoft has been
known to lay an egg from time to time.  That said, as it turns out, the Phillips
prototype performed exceptionally well.

One _major_ measurement decision directly affecting the results of the study
needs to get drawn out -- there is no standard for the sensing threshold for
these devices.  The White Spaces Coalition created a standard of -114 dBm as the
necessary level of measure.  However, the 802.22 committee has also been working
on a standard (which is not yet set) of -116 dBm.  The prototypes were
ngineered to the -114 dBm standard; however, the FCC researchers tested them
based on the IEEE proposal of -116 dBm.  In essence, they were tested outside of
spec to begin with (you can read the FCC's statement to the effect in the second
paragraph of section 3.1 of the report).

Several figures included in the report include the gradients from -119 dBm to
-113 dBm -- so one can find out how the Phillips prototype did at the -114 dBm
that it was manufactured to -- and the results are _stunning_:

Figure 3-4. Baseline Detection Threshold Results for Prototype B (page 14 of the
report) -- measures how well the prototype detects a DTV signal on the same
channel.  At -114 dBm this prototype detected a signal 100% of the time (not a
lot, majority, most, or almost all, but 100%). At -115 dBm is also detects TV
signal 100% of the time (i.e., the prototype performs even better than it was
manufactured to do).  It's only at the -116 dBm mark (which is out of spec) that
it only detects things about 97% of the time on two of the channels and less
than 40% of the time on a third channel.  Of course, only the out-of-spec -116
dBm results were widely disseminating while the in-spec -114 dBm home run wasn't
mentioned at all.

Figure 3-9. Two-Channel Detection Threshold Test Results for WSD Prototype B
(page 18 of the report) -- measures how well the prototype detects DTV signal on
adjacent channels.  Once again, at -114 dBm the Phillips prototype detects
adjacent channel signals 100% of the time.  It does poorly at the -116 dBm mark,
but it was never manufactured to measure at that sensitivity.

The Phillips prototype was never used in field tests (at the request of the
manufacturer).  But taken together, it appears that unlicensed devices can work
_extremely well_ within the TV-Band at the level of sensitivity they are
manufactured to see.  The problem is that they were tested completely
out-of-spec (I suspect that the manufacturers did not know that the FCC would
use a different testing metric than they were using).  When tested in-spec, the
Phillips Prototype scored a whopping 100% on both bench tests -- which is both
remarkable and quite promising for the technology.

It's rare that I find something so completely different from what has been
reported.  But in this case, the news has all been that the idea is a complete
failure; yet it appears that the Phillips Prototype has demonstrated quite
conclusively that unlicensed devices in unused bands are quite possible.

--Sascha Meinrath
Research Director
Wireless Futures Program
New America Foundation


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Re: [WISPA] BellSouth rescinds N.O. donation

2005-12-06 Thread Sascha Meinrath

Hi all,

 Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 10:33:00 -0600
 From: Joe Laura [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] BellSouth rescinds N.O. donation
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org

 And with bell having to rebuild their whole infrastructure here in New
 Orleans its a bigger slap in the face IMO. The hotel owners are pretty upset
 with this as well. Ya, the City has really ruffled some feathers over this
 move.

Regardless of whether or not the City of New Orleans government needs a spanking 
;) -- I have a fairly different take on this matter, one less focused on the 
specifics of the New Orleans/BellSouth fiasco and more oriented toward 
BellSouth's general business strategy.  BellSouth is clearly attempting to 
leverage it's market dominance in one area (wireline communications) to prevent 
competition in a different realm (in this case, wireless networking).  This is 
exactly the type of dynamic that anti-trust laws were intended to keep in check.


BellSouth's actions in New Orleans are just the most recent manifestation of a 
strategy that _will_ be utilized against folks like us (e.g., independent ISPs). 
   BellSouth has systematically attempted to prevent any sort of competition 
within their service areas -- their New Orleans tantrum is only the latest 
example.  I wrote up a brief piece about some of their most recent actions here:


http://www.saschameinrath.com/2005dec04bellsouths_shame

I'm sure there are numerous ways in which the City of New Orleans needs 
reforming -- but BellSouth's actions are targeted against any and all 
competitive entities -- they will certainly focus on WISPA members down the 
road.  Instead of blaming New Orleans for what is obviously a widespread 
business strategy, I'd recommend focusing on BellSouth, who clearly isn't 
interested in playing well with others and has a well-documented history of 
using its market power to bully others.


--Sascha

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[WISPA] CUWiN Release 0.6.0

2006-01-19 Thread Sascha Meinrath

Hi all,

With all the talk of various pros and cons of proprietary and non- networking 
solutions, I thought I'd mention that the CUWiN project has just released (as of 
yesterday) version 0.6.0 of our software.  Yes, it's open source; yes, it's free 
(and always will be); and yes, it's mesh.  This is _not_ v1.0 (i.e., it's not 
ready for use on your mission-critical infrastructure) -- but it is a 
non-proprietary solution that developers from around the globe are working on 
and that has the potential to significantly lower the cost of wireless broadband 
service provision.  We're always interested in working with folks that want to 
help out with development and we're also very interested in getting feedback 
from anyone that wants to play around with the technology.


Over the next year we're planning to port the software to a consumer-grade 
device -- think (indoor) CPE of $30-50.  And we're talking with folks about what 
the best device might be for this.


Intrigued? More info at:  www.cuwireless.net

--Sascha

P.S.  The Second National Summit for Community Wireless Networks will be 
happening March 31-April 2nd in St. Louis.  We haven't gotten the website fully 
updated yet, but you can catch a peek at:  www.cuwireless.net/summit  I'll be 
sending out an official invite soon, but if you want to register and reserve 
your spot, you can do there.


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Policy Analyst*  Project Coordinator  *  President
Free Press   *** CUWiN   *** Acorn Active Media
www.freepress.net *  www.cuwireless.net   *  www.acornactivemedia.com
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Re: [WISPA] Speed test volunteers anyone?

2012-08-31 Thread Sascha Meinrath
Hi all,

I'd be curious if folks have tried using the measurementlab.net speed test and
what you're getting from this platform.

Let me know,

--Sascha
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