[WISPA] Strategies For Finding Bandwidth

2011-11-07 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
How do I go about finding a bandwidth provider? I have been tasked to
find 100Megs of Internet and have exhausted all the options I know.
What I have done so far is contact other ISP's in the area and asked
them if they can get me Internet. So far everybody has said no because
they can figure out a way to deliver it.

So what I am asking what are some other avenues that I can explore to
get bandwidth to this location? Generic advise is fine as I may have
to do this once more for another site.

I am purposely not saying the address on a public list but if that
will help I can let you know off list.

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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Re: [WISPA] Strategies For Finding Bandwidth

2011-11-07 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
That seems reasonable I am looking for Bandwith in Billings MT

_
/-\ Andrew
Sent from my phone
On Nov 7, 2011 9:33 AM, Faisal Imtiaz fai...@snappydsl.net wrote:

 I think if you want interested parties to reply to you, you should at
 least disclose the State  City where you are looking for service.

 Regards.

 Faisal Imtiaz
 Snappy Internet  Telecom
 7266 SW 48 Street
 Miami, Fl 33155
 Tel: 305 663 5518 x 232
 Helpdesk: 305 663 5518 option 2 Email: supp...@snappydsl.net


 On 11/7/2011 11:22 AM, Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
  How do I go about finding a bandwidth provider? I have been tasked to
  find 100Megs of Internet and have exhausted all the options I know.
  What I have done so far is contact other ISP's in the area and asked
  them if they can get me Internet. So far everybody has said no because
  they can figure out a way to deliver it.
 
  So what I am asking what are some other avenues that I can explore to
  get bandwidth to this location? Generic advise is fine as I may have
  to do this once more for another site.
 
  I am purposely not saying the address on a public list but if that
  will help I can let you know off list.
 
  Thanks,
_
  /-\ ndrew
 
 
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] OT: Linux Virtualization

2011-07-25 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I am going to throw my 2 cents in.


On Mon, Jul 25, 2011 at 10:04 AM, Nick W lists-wi...@atomsplash.com wrote:
 I've been experimenting with both the last 2 weeks. I've read that VMWare
 will have a 16GB limitation in it's next free version, which is pushing me
 to Xen/XenServer. Just ordered parts for iSCSI SAN.

 On Mon, Jul 25, 2011 at 8:38 AM, Josh Luthman j...@imaginenetworksllc.com
 wrote:

 Xen and Vmware are pretty good.  I would not suggest using a Linux distro
 and would go with a bare metal (vsphere, xen's alternative)


FOSS virt stuff has come a long way since I first started using it 5
years ago. There a couple FOSS projects that I recommend  to try out.

The first and most mature is called Proxmox VE
(http://www.proxmox.com/products/proxmox-ve) it is a bare metal Linux
distribution that can be installed on most any server supporting Intel
or AMD virtualzation instructions (most do). Proxmox is a Debian based
distro so anything you can do with Debian can be done with Proxmox.
This has lead to some cool things in terms of HA and replication that
the community has built. The Proxmox feature set is not to bad, it is
no Vmware enterprise plus but does the job. It is in active
development has a nice easy to use web interface and supports
clustering. Future releases (like the upcoming 2.0 release) will
include things like HA out of the box.

The second project is called OpenNode (http://opennode.activesys.org/)
is similar to Proxmox in a few ways. OpenNode like Proxmox can do both
OpenVZ and KVM. It is a CentOS based hypervisor and can be clustered.
It is younger that Proxmox and the out of the box feature set is less.
I however like how easy it is to customize and script various common
tasks. It follows the standard way of doing things in Linux better
than Proxmox does (IMHO) and is also lighter weight, I install the OS
on flash based disks so space is a premium for me. It also will allow
you to take a generic CentOS install and convert it to a OpenNode
member easily.

Both can use iSCSI or other type of shared storage for VM's, I have
had great success with using iSCSI with both distributions, NFS not as
much but that was do to some implementation stuff.

As with anything I recommend you test stuff out and see what fits your
environment best. That being said either of those projects will get
you up and running fast with a minimal learning curve.


I can answer more questions if you have them.

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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Re: [WISPA] OT: Linux Virtualization

2011-07-25 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Hi,

On Mon, Jul 25, 2011 at 2:35 PM, Matt lm7...@gmail.com wrote:

 I can answer more questions if you have them.

 Good info, thanks.  If I go with Proxmox can I later switch to
 Opennode by simply copying my virtual machines over to Opennode?  Is
 OpenVZ preferred over KVM for linux applications that do not care
 about the shared kernel?

 Initially I am just thinking a dual or quad core socket 1156 processor
 with say 8 to 16G of RAM and a few terrabytes of disk in software
 RAID1.  I am assuming the nice thing about containers is I can easily
 move everything down the road to better/faster hardware?


Yes, you can easily switch between the two distros, the back end tech
(KVM and OpenVZ) is the same for them both. So moving can be a simple
rysnc and some minor tweaks.

Proxmox will not support software RAID, the community as a whole seems
to frown upon it. That does not mean that it will not work but it will
take some manual tweaking. OpenNode does not really care what hardware
you use and so are forgiving to things like software raid, at least
more so than Proxmox.

If you make a clustered environment, which is possible with either
distro you can migrate the box to another host without any downtime.
The host that you move it to can be bigger faster hardware. You can
also make a backup of the machine and restore it to newer hardware if
a little bit of down time is acceptable.

I hope this helps,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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Re: [WISPA] OpenSource Email Server platform

2011-03-28 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
The two that I would look at would be qmailtoaster.com or zimbra.com

They are both open source and run on Linux and both work really well
without much headache.

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew

On Mon, Mar 28, 2011 at 1:53 PM, Patrick D. Nix, Jr
pni...@cnetworksolutions.com wrote:
 Since we began in '98 we've been using the same windows based email server 
 MailMax.  Because of some support/productivity issues we are investigating 
 integrating a new box.  The requirements are: webmail, web management of 
 individuals mail accounts (with password reset), pop3/smtp/imap, can run on 
 Windows or Linux.  We would also like a calendar and address book module in 
 webmail as well.

 Anyone have suggestions?

 Thanks,
 Patrick Nix, Jr.,
 Computer Network Solutions
 CSWEB.NET Internet Services
 IT Manager
 http://www.cnetworksolutions.com
 http://www.csweb.net
 (918) 235-0414


 Attention: This e-mail and any attachments may contain confidential and 
 privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify 
 the sender immediately by return e-mail, delete this e-mail and destroy any 
 copies. Any dissemination or use of this information by a person other than 
 the intended recipient is unauthorized and may be illegal.


 
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Re: [WISPA] IPTV -- Anyone doing it?

2009-11-25 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Can you describe your setup a little more. Like what you are using for
software and stuff? I too have a project where this may be useful.

On Wed, Nov 25, 2009 at 1:29 AM, Jayson Baker jay...@spectrasurf.com wrote:
 Tonight we spent a few more hours on this project.

 We're now streaming live satellite TV programming via multicast over our
 network.
 Unencrypted, and only MPEG 2 for now.

 The stream is about 6Mbps.  It's going over a wireless backhaul, and into a
 UBNT AirMax system.
 It's being received over the AirMax system, but not being decoded properly.

 Not sure if it's the AirMax, or this laptop that's the issue.  Leaning
 towards the laptop.
 When on the same network as the streambox the feed looks great, time-shift
 works perfect.

 We're using a PIII 933MHz machine with 1GB of RAM.  It was laying around

 I will investigate more soon as to why it's not working via the AirMax.
 I'll also try to get the MPEG 4 codec situated on the encoder.

 I did find out from Amino that their STB's should work without 3rd party
 middleware.
 Basically, they have embedded browsers--point to your HTML server, which has
 pages to streams.

 You could fashion up your own guide and program info, etc.
 This would work especially well if you're not broadcasting networks with
 requirements, but just OTA.

 On Fri, Nov 20, 2009 at 11:52 AM, Mike Hammett 
 wispawirel...@ics-il.netwrote:

 So we're looking at $25k for the hardware to do an MPEG-4 H.264 IPTV system
 for up to 100 channels?

 Remaining items needed (or desired):

 1)  Middleware (Minerva)
 2)  Licensing (only your past seems to indicate that this can be done)
 3)  VoD
 4)  Content stream from Avail or Echostar

 Missing anything?

 Costs for the others?


 -
 Mike Hammett
 Intelligent Computing Solutions
 http://www.ics-il.com



 --
 From: Jayson Baker jay...@spectrasurf.com
 Sent: Monday, November 16, 2009 12:20 PM
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] IPTV -- Anyone doing it?

  Interestingly enough, I've had a project lying on my desk for a couple
  weeks
  now which requires streaming live content to a large group of people in a
  neighborhood (think of it as a neighborhood association wanting to
  broadcast
  their meetings to their residents).  I don't know why I didn't see the
  similarity between this post and that project.
 
  I just spent the last couple hours working on this, and now have a Linux
  server streaming the content out over the wireless network multicast
  without
  any issues.
 
  Taking a deeper look...
  We have ASI-input cards from Linear Systems.  They take 4 ASI streams...
  maybe 32 each?  I can't remember.
 
  A quick look on eBay found some Moto C-Band receivers that output 32 ASI
  streams for under $1000.
 
  An entire receiving, encoding, streaming headend for under 100 channels
  could be built for probably under $25,000.
 
  I don't know what you're after, but if there is some serious interest in
  putting effort into something like this, we might be on board.
 
  Jayson
 
  On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 9:31 AM, Jack Unger jun...@ask-wi.com wrote:
 
  Blake,
 
  In general the IPTV principles being discussed would apply to any
  broadband wireless system either license-free, licensed, or
  licensed-lite.
 
  jack
 
 
  Blake Covarrubias wrote:
   I've read the responses from others who are running IPTV over
 wireless.
  
   My question is when you all are saying wireless, do you mean
 unlicensed
  2.4ghz or 5.8ghz, or do you mean wireless technology in general?
  
   My company utilizes 2.5 and 3.65ghz, which are the same frequencies
   we'd
  be looking to use to deploy IPTV.
  
   --
   Blake Covarrubias
  
   On Nov 15, 2009, at 4:03 PM, Mike Hammett wrote:
  
  
   Every time this comes up, I say the same thing.  You can't over
  wireless.
   The content owners WILL NOT license it for wireless use.  I've tried
   numerous times
 
  --
  Jack Unger - President, Ask-Wi.Com, Inc.
  Author - Deploying License-Free Wireless WANs
  Serving the Broadband Wireless Industry Since 1993
  www.ask-wi.com  818-227-4220  jun...@ask-wi.com
 
  Sent from my Pizzicato PluckString...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] Router suggestions

2009-09-20 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Why not just by a switch? Switches have no NAT and are cheap. Slap up
a cheap AP an you have your solution however it is not all in one.



On Sun, Sep 20, 2009 at 4:11 PM, Mike Hammett wispawirel...@ics-il.net wrote:
 Something like 80% of the time I've been to a network had Linksys, it's been
 broken.


 -
 Mike Hammett
 Intelligent Computing Solutions
 http://www.ics-il.com



 --
 From: Robert West robert.w...@just-micro.com
 Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 5:08 PM
 To: 'WISPA General List' wireless@wispa.org
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Router suggestions

 Not with multiple lan and at 50 bucks.

 Why not Linksys?  You can always put third party firmware on it if you
 want.
 I use DD-WRT on them when I have use one.  I've even taken a few of them
 out
 of the factory case and put them in other boxes with the CPE.  At 55
 bucks,
 they are certainly cheap and with the DD-WRT, they are much more
 configurable.

 Robert West
 Just Micro digital Services Inc.









 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Gino Villarini
 Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 5:58 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Router suggestions

 Mikrotik?

 Gino A. Villarini
 g...@aeronetpr.com
 Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
 tel  787.273.4143   fax   787.273.4145
 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Mike Hammett
 Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2009 5:36 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Router suggestions

 I'm looking for suggestions on an 802.11 router with multiple LAN ports
 where I can disable the NAT capability...  making it a bridge.  I used
 to use the TrendNet TEW-452BRP, but it's EOL and the TEW-633GR is too
 expensive ($100).  I'm looking for something in the $30 - $45 area.

 No Linksys, I don't want to tarnish my name.  :-p


 -
 Mike Hammett
 Intelligent Computing Solutions
 http://www.ics-il.com



 
 
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[WISPA] Routerboard Cases

2009-05-26 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I have the need for an outdoor router. It needs to have two Ethernet
ports. I am looking at the RB433 as the router but I need a suggestion
for an outdoor case that will work having never used a RB433 before.
Any suggestions?

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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[WISPA] Ubiquiti Pico Station 2

2009-03-02 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Where can I buy these? I have seen some stuff from Ubiquiti that they
are shipping but I can't seem to find anybody that carries them.
Anybody have any info?

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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[WISPA] Need 18ghz link

2009-02-10 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I am looking for a good place to get an 18ghz link, where do you guys
suggest. Ideally the company would also procure the licence for us. I
am thinking I want the Trango APEX because of it cost / performance.
So if anybody has suggestions on a good company to use I am all ears!

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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Re: [WISPA] Google's email services for ISPs

2009-01-06 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I don't know if it is because we use the premier edition but POP3 or
IMAP is turned on automatically by checking POP3 or IMAP twice in a
row. The first time if fails but the second time it succeeds, no
logging into the account manually.

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew

On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 9:35 AM, David E. Smith d...@mvn.net wrote:
 Patrick Nix Jr. wrote:
 For those who may be using Google's branded services for ISPs can
 someone tell me where to go to find more information and how is it
 working for you.

 If I were starting a new outfit today, I'd probably just let them do all
 the hard work, and host all my users' email. Domain names and Web
 hosting are dirt-cheap, and if you want to be just an Internet access
 provider, not doing any hosting and having relatively little
 server-room-type infrastructure, it's a good way to save a few bucks.

 For a pre-existing outfit, though, migrating to Google Apps could be
 tricky. For us, the one really big stumbling block was the fact that
 most of our users use POP3 and something like Outlook Express or
 Thunderbird. When last I looked into this, the Google Apps API wouldn't
 let you enable POP3 and IMAP automatically. We'd have been forced to
 have someone manually log into every mailbox and turn that on.

 (They said it was to force users to accept their TOS, but I can't escape
 the feeling that Google wants people to use the Web interface because
 that's where the ads are; forcing that initial login gives them a free
 shot at showing you the Gmail interface, which admittedly is awfully
 attractive.)

 David Smith
 MVN.net


 
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Re: [WISPA] Preventing backwards router problems

2008-09-05 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I am using a Linux box as the router, I am going to add a couple more
interfaces to that box and call the problem solved for now. Going
forward I will be looking at a topology change to prevent these
issues. PPPoE looks like the ticket.

On Thu, Sep 4, 2008 at 11:07 PM, Butch Evans [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 On Thu, 4 Sep 2008, Charles Wyble wrote:

- Many APs have client isolation, which keeps traffic from one
client going to another.  Some switches have this as well.

Wouldn't all switches have this by design and during normal
operation (various exploits to sniff traffic non withstanding of
course).

 Charles,
 All switches do not, unfortunately, have this capability.  The
 switches (low end) will stop SOME traffic, but broadcast traffic
 (like DHCP DISCOVER) will NOT be stopped by the switch.  In fact, if
 the switch DID stop this traffic, you'd not be able to do DHCP on a
 switched network, which is, of course, possible.

- PPPoE or similar between the customer premise and your network
core

 Clint,
 I agree that this is probably a best solution, but given the network
 he described, I'd approach it in a slightly different way.  I can't
 recall who initially asked the question that started this thread,
 but my initial reaction, given the information you've provided
 regarding the network design.

 First, as Clint suggested, you should consider some design changes
 that would make the network more reliable AND easier to
 troubleshoot.  With the network gear you've described, there is no
 easy way to create the separation between the APs.  His suggestion
 to ensure you have client to client comms turned off is the first
 step.  In order to create separation between the APs, you have one
 of 2 quick/easy choices.  First, you can configure your switch to
 put each of the APs on a unique VLAN, then configure the router on
 the trunk port and separate/manage the traffic at the router.  This
 is going to be the cheapest option IF your switch already supports
 VLANs with a trunk port option.

 The second option would be to physically separate the APs by putting
 them into different ports on your router (instead of on a switch).
 This option, of course, assumes you either already have the spare
 ethernet ports, or could add them easier/cheaper than you could do
 so with a switch.  You never did mention what type of router you
 have.  Please fill in this detail and we can provide a better/more
 complete answer.

 --
 
 *Butch Evans*Professional Network Consultation *
 *Network Engineering*MikroTik RouterOS *
 *573-276-2879   *ImageStream   *
 *http://www.butchevans.com/ *StarOS and MORE   *
 *http://blog.butchevans.com/*Wired or wireless Networks*
 *Mikrotik Certified Consultant  *Professional Technical Trainer*
 


 
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Re: [WISPA] Preventing backwards router problems

2008-09-04 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 4:42 PM, Charles Wyble [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
 How to I prevent SOHO routers from handing out bogus DHCP information
 when they are plugged in backwards?


 Filter them upstream?


How would I filter upstream? All clients go into a switch so I would
have to filter at the switch level, what switches provide this?

 Also on a seperate note; long ago on this list there was a Linux
 distro that was basically a WISP management you put it on the gateway
 router and it only allowed MAC authorized clients to the internet
 everybody else was pointed to a captive portal. Does anybody remember
 this or could give me a link to it again?


 Chillispot? Wifi-DOG? There are a few of them.


This was more of a WISP dashboard program. The captive portal stuff
was secondary the main part of the program was more of an access
controller. It allowed the admin to control IP's maintain MAC ACL's

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew


 --
 Charles Wyble (818) 280 - 7059
 http://charlesnw.blogspot.com
 CTO Known Element Enterprises / SoCal WiFI project



 
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Re: [WISPA] Preventing backwards router problems

2008-09-04 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
On Thu, Sep 4, 2008 at 8:49 AM, Charles Wyble [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
 On Wed, Sep 3, 2008 at 4:42 PM, Charles Wyble [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:

 How to I prevent SOHO routers from handing out bogus DHCP information
 when they are plugged in backwards?


 Filter them upstream?



 How would I filter upstream? All clients go into a switch so I would
 have to filter at the switch level, what switches provide this?


 So what exactly did you mean by plugged in backwards? The WAN port
 instead of the LAN port?
 Can you explain your architecture  a bit?

Yes, when I say plugged in backwards I mean that a LAN port is plugged
into the WAN cable broadcasting bogus DHCP infomation. Currently the
architecture is bridged. There are three access points (Ubquity NS2)
that all come down to a switch the switch is then connected the
gateway router that is running DHCP.


 This was more of a WISP dashboard program. The captive portal stuff
 was secondary the main part of the program was more of an access
 controller. It allowed the admin to control IP's maintain MAC ACL's


 Ah. Well check out ZeroShell for this. Its a very cool distro. Also
 check out Untangle.

These are closer to what I want however not the original program that
I am thinking of. The main feature that I am wanting is something that
will allow authorized clients direct access to the internet no
clicking ok to continue or anything like that. Un-authorized clients
should be directed to a captive portal type deal.

Thanks
 _
/-\ ndrew



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[WISPA] Preventing backwards router problems

2008-09-03 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
How to I prevent SOHO routers from handing out bogus DHCP information
when they are plugged in backwards?

Also on a seperate note; long ago on this list there was a Linux
distro that was basically a WISP management you put it on the gateway
router and it only allowed MAC authorized clients to the internet
everybody else was pointed to a captive portal. Does anybody remember
this or could give me a link to it again?



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Re: [WISPA] PHP Speed test

2008-04-01 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Try this one out. Seems to work well for me.

http://www.brandonchecketts.com/open-source-speedtest/

On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 1:49 PM, Eric Merkel [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Does anyone know of a good free/opensource php-based speed test? I
  would like something graphical which shows both upload and download
  speeds.

  Thanks,
  Eric


  
 
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Re: [WISPA] Private vs Public addresses for end-users

2008-01-29 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
On Jan 29, 2008 11:52 AM, Bryan Scott [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Tom DeReggi wrote:
  Yes but there are some security concerns with DHCP when sharing wireless
  sectors. To prevent requires tracking MAC addressess, which is one more
  headache to track. Sure if you are doing true 802.11 CPE, no problem, the
  link uses the MAC of the CPE that you already know, but when supporting true
  bridging, it means discovering teh MAC of the customer provided Home Router.

 Any radio worth its salt that does true bridging would also have a
 bridging table that is accessible via SNMP or HTML screen scraping.  One
 of our in-house programs polls all the AP's (we're a Canopy outfit, but
 same principles apply to most Ethernet-based gear) and saves the MAC
 addresses to a database, where I match the MACs to the subscriber's
 radio and back to their account.

 It's usefulness is most apparent when a customer wonders why their
 connection is lousy and we can see that they've either got 1) their
 radio plugged into a switch instead of a router and we can see all their
 computers, or 2) their computer is doing one of those
 change-my-mac-every-10-seconds network attack things.

 Our central DHCP server logs which router the requests come from as
 well, helping us to narrow down which section of the network to search
 in the case that the MAC doesn't show up in any of the radios.

So what happens when the customer plugs the radio into the switch and
is broadcasting his local DHCP info to everybody? That would really
mess up the network.



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[WISPA] For those using IPTrack

2008-01-09 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I am trying a new install of IPTrack. I have my router all set up and
sending NetFlow data (verified by tcpdump and NTOP) however when I try
to start IPTrack I get these errors:
Use of uninitialized value in pattern match (m//) at
/usr/src/iptrack/iptrack_capture.pl line 198.
Use of uninitialized value in pattern match (m//) at
/usr/src/iptrack/iptrack_capture.pl line 205.

They flood my terminal, I am guessing they happen every time flow data
is received. Has anybody else experienced such problems? What did you
do to get around them? I tried contacting the developer but have been
unsuccessful. The IPTrack host is a CentOS 5 box. I am wondering if
the Perl version is causing conflicts.

Any help? Or ideas on where to get help?

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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Re: [WISPA] OT......Question

2007-12-10 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Kismet works better than I could ever get network stumbler to work.
More details too...

On Dec 10, 2007 1:05 PM, CHUCK  PROFITO [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Please add network stumbler to the list

 Chuck Profito
 209-988-7388
 CV-ACCESS, INC
 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Providing High Speed Broadband
 to Rural Central California


 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
 Behalf Of Travis Johnson
 Sent: Monday, December 10, 2007 9:57 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] OT..Question



 Adobe Photoshop
 Scansoft Paperport
 Quickbooks
 iTunes (for my iPhone)
 Streets and Trips 2008
 Radio Mobile
 Quark Xpress
 Visio

 thanks,

 Travis
 Microserv

 Butch Evans wrote:
  On Sun, 9 Dec 2007, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 
  Maybe if apple or linux had hundreds of thousands of programs written
  for it, they would be of benefit or offer a little competition to
  MicroSoft But when it is barely into the hundreds, it is easy to
  have it work so easily.
 
  What?  There are THOUSANDS of programs for Linux.  Do you use
  thousands of programs?  Give me a list of the must have programs you
  use, I can almost certainly give you a list of programs for Linux that
  will accomplish what you are looking for.
 


 
 
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Re: [WISPA] PowerStation2 Problem

2007-11-17 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Happens to frequently for it to be the watch dog, but the watchdog is off.

On Nov 16, 2007 5:26 PM, Mark Nash [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 watchdog rebooting the device?

 Mark Nash
 UnwiredOnline.Net
 350 Holly Street
 Junction City, OR 97448
 http://www.uwol.net
 541-998-
 541-998-5599 fax


 - Original Message -
 From: Andrew Niemantsverdriet [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Friday, November 16, 2007 4:22 PM
 Subject: [WISPA] PowerStation2 Problem


  I have a Ubiquiti PowerStaion2 that is having some weird issues. It
  has a -68 signal and good LOS to the AP however there is packet loss
  on the link but only from the Ethernet side of it. From the radio side
  (pinging from the gateway) I see no such loss. The Ethernet drops from
  10-30 seconds and then continues on like normal, when this happens I
  can still ping from the gateway to the radio IP. This is running as a
  bridge and has ver. 2.9 firmware on it, I upgraded from 2.8 to try to
  fix the problem in a last ditch effort. Any ideas as to what is going
  on? The AP is custom linux box and no other problems like this exist
  on any of the other clients.
 
  Thanks,
   _
  /-\ ndrew
 
 
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[WISPA] PowerStation2 Problem

2007-11-16 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet
I have a Ubiquiti PowerStaion2 that is having some weird issues. It
has a -68 signal and good LOS to the AP however there is packet loss
on the link but only from the Ethernet side of it. From the radio side
(pinging from the gateway) I see no such loss. The Ethernet drops from
10-30 seconds and then continues on like normal, when this happens I
can still ping from the gateway to the radio IP. This is running as a
bridge and has ver. 2.9 firmware on it, I upgraded from 2.8 to try to
fix the problem in a last ditch effort. Any ideas as to what is going
on? The AP is custom linux box and no other problems like this exist
on any of the other clients.

Thanks,
 _
/-\ ndrew



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[WISPA] FM Radio and Ethernet

2007-05-22 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I am co located on a tower with an FM transmitter. The FM station runs
at 105Mhz. We were running one AP at 10 half duplex to overcome the
havoc that the FM station created on our ethernet feed. We now need to
run that link at 100 full duplex to be able to handle the traffic
coming through it. What are some hints tips tricks to make it work.

The cable run itself is 150' of shielded CAT5. It works fine at 10 H/D
and it works at 100 F/D most of the time but it will occasionally go
down and there is some intermittent packet loss on that link. The run
itself terminates into a managed switch.

If CAT5 won't work, is fiber my next option? How does that work? I
assume that I need power up the tower as well? Any tips to make that
happen assuming keeping the existing CAT5 won't work.
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Re: [WISPA] FM Radio and Ethernet

2007-05-22 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I did run on the other leg opsite of the transmistion line. We are
above the FM radio antenna so our CAT5 run passes the back side of at
25,000 watt transmitter.

Why the 110v in that conduit?

On 5/22/07, Dennis Burgess [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

We are located at 400 foot on a FM tower, 100,000 watts at the top of 1400
foot.

The total length of CAT 5 is 440 foot or so, and plug directly into a RB532
at the top of the tower (power at the top as well)

We ran a felexable conduit up the tower, inside, 16awg solid copper, one
black, one white, (for the 110), NO GROUND, and also in that same conduit,
we ran good outdoor, sheilded CAT5, UV Resistant (even though it is fully
enclosed), and we get a 100meg link without issues for the most part!

One thing we did do, is ensure that we were on the other side of all the
transmission lines running up the tower.

Dennis



On 5/22/07, Andrew Niemantsverdriet [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I am co located on a tower with an FM transmitter. The FM station runs
 at 105Mhz. We were running one AP at 10 half duplex to overcome the
 havoc that the FM station created on our ethernet feed. We now need to
 run that link at 100 full duplex to be able to handle the traffic
 coming through it. What are some hints tips tricks to make it work.

 The cable run itself is 150' of shielded CAT5. It works fine at 10 H/D
 and it works at 100 F/D most of the time but it will occasionally go
 down and there is some intermittent packet loss on that link. The run
 itself terminates into a managed switch.

 If CAT5 won't work, is fiber my next option? How does that work? I
 assume that I need power up the tower as well? Any tips to make that
 happen assuming keeping the existing CAT5 won't work.
 --
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--
Dennis Burgess, MCP, CCNA, A+, N+, Mikrotik Certified Consultant
www.mikrotikconsulting.com
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
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Re: [WISPA] FM Radio and Ethernet

2007-05-22 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

So how do you secure the conduit to the tower legs? Zip ties?

On 5/22/07, Scott Reed [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Again,
Check your local code before you copy this.  No ground is not allowed
here, unless somehow you can prove it is a temporary extension cord.
Neither is low voltage in same conduit at 120VAC.

That said, small changes to Dennis' configuration will make good
installation.

Run the cat5 in a separate (metallic) pipe (rigid, EMT, Sealtite,
whatever you like).  Ground the bottom of the pipe.  I would leave the
top ungrounded, but that is:
1) personal preference (eliminates ground loops).
2) determined by which way gives you the best performance, least
interference from the FM.
You may want to use cat5e or cat6 as the twist is tighter, thus
accepting less interference as well.

Run a ground wire with the power.  Even for the low current required at
the top, I would probably run 14AWG or 12AWG. Lowers the inductance, may
allow less noise to be induced on the power leads.   Besides, 14AWG is
the smallest wire you can run with a 15amp breaker.  Same thing with
ground loops; I would probably use a plastic box and thus isolate the
power ground from the enclosure, tower, etc.

One good way to do it is consult a local commercial/industrial
electrician.  They will know the code for your area.  But they don't
always understand radio and induced voltages.


Dennis Burgess wrote:
 We are located at 400 foot on a FM tower, 100,000 watts at the top of
 1400
 foot.

 The total length of CAT 5 is 440 foot or so, and plug directly into a
 RB532
 at the top of the tower (power at the top as well)

 We ran a felexable conduit up the tower, inside, 16awg solid copper, one
 black, one white, (for the 110), NO GROUND, and also in that same
 conduit,
 we ran good outdoor, sheilded CAT5, UV Resistant (even though it is fully
 enclosed), and we get a 100meg link without issues for the most part!

 One thing we did do, is ensure that we were on the other side of all the
 transmission lines running up the tower.

 Dennis



 On 5/22/07, Andrew Niemantsverdriet [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I am co located on a tower with an FM transmitter. The FM station runs
 at 105Mhz. We were running one AP at 10 half duplex to overcome the
 havoc that the FM station created on our ethernet feed. We now need to
 run that link at 100 full duplex to be able to handle the traffic
 coming through it. What are some hints tips tricks to make it work.

 The cable run itself is 150' of shielded CAT5. It works fine at 10 H/D
 and it works at 100 F/D most of the time but it will occasionally go
 down and there is some intermittent packet loss on that link. The run
 itself terminates into a managed switch.

 If CAT5 won't work, is fiber my next option? How does that work? I
 assume that I need power up the tower as well? Any tips to make that
 happen assuming keeping the existing CAT5 won't work.
 --
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--
Scott Reed
Owner
NewWays
Wireless Networking
Network Design, Installation and Administration
www.nwwnet.net

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Re: [WISPA] Radio choices

2007-04-30 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I too would like to see the wilibox interface.

On 4/30/07, Mark McElvy [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Do you happen to have a way to look at the Wilibox interface?

Mark McElvy
AccuBak Data Systems, Inc.


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Harold Bledsoe
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 1:56 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Radio choices

We have a new unit out this week that is based on Wilibox software.  It
can do everything you want except PPPoE.  Can you do PPPoE concentration
further upstream or put a wired box at the site for this function?

Virtual AP, Hotspot, WPA/2 PSK and Radius, etc. are all options for the
AP platform otherwise.

-Hal

Harold Bledsoe
Deliberant LLC

800.742.9865 x205 (office)
404.693.0660 (cell)
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
http://www.deliberant.com


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Mark McElvy
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 1:15 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Radio choices

I am getting ready to expand my network by adding a couple of new
towers. The decision I am trying to make is what equipment to buy. My
plan was to use Mikrotik for a BH/AP, but with all the certification
talk, I am looking in different directions. I am looking for the
following features.



PPPoE at the AP

Virtual AP

Hotspot



These are the basics. I run my clients with PPPoe and have a virtualAP
setup as a hotspot to catch people passing through. Any one know of
certified equipment that is as flexible as Mikrotik? Have looked at
Deliberant but don't know if it can do the VAP and hotspot.



Mark McElvy
AccuBak Data Systems, Inc.





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[WISPA] Switch that will surrive outdoors

2007-04-23 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I am in need of a switch that can live outdoors in an enclosure. It
needs to be small (5 ports) and cheap as the customer dose not want to
any more that he has to. It also needs to surrive the hot and cold
temps that it will experiance. Any reccomendations?
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Re: [WISPA] Switch that will surrive outdoors

2007-04-23 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

Model Number??

On 4/23/07, Travis Johnson [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Netgear 5 port. I've had several in boxes for 2-3 years with temps from
-30F to 100F.

Travis
Microserv

Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
 I am in need of a switch that can live outdoors in an enclosure. It
 needs to be small (5 ports) and cheap as the customer dose not want to
 any more that he has to. It also needs to surrive the hot and cold
 temps that it will experiance. Any reccomendations?
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Re: [WISPA] Switch that will surrive outdoors

2007-04-23 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

Thanks Travis and David,

Those look like they will do the trick and at $13 +shipping can't beat
the price!


On 4/23/07, Travis Johnson [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

FS105

Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
 Model Number??

 On 4/23/07, Travis Johnson [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Netgear 5 port. I've had several in boxes for 2-3 years with temps from
 -30F to 100F.

 Travis
 Microserv

 Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
  I am in need of a switch that can live outdoors in an enclosure. It
  needs to be small (5 ports) and cheap as the customer dose not want to
  any more that he has to. It also needs to surrive the hot and cold
  temps that it will experiance. Any reccomendations?
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Re: [WISPA] Trango 900

2007-04-16 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I have gotten a 2.9Megs out of mine, the signal level was -61 and I am
in a moderately quiet noise floor.

On 4/13/07, Don Annas [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

We are seeing 2.2mb of actual throughput.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of chris cooper
Sent: Friday, April 13, 2007 11:21 AM
To: 'WISPA General List'
Subject: [WISPA] Trango 900


What is the non-vendor speak, actual production max throughput on a Trango
900 Mhz AP?

Thanks
Chris

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[WISPA] LiteStation5

2007-03-17 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

Has anybody used these? Do they work well? Are they stable?

Can they do 5.3GHz or just 5.8GHz?

Just wondering how they work.

Thanks
Andrew
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Re: [WISPA] External battery on UPS

2007-03-17 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I would be insterested as well

On 3/17/07, Anthony Will [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

I would be interested in learning more about it.

Anthony
Broadband Corp.

Russ Kreigh wrote:
 Yeah, it's completely possible, and will work well, at least once, until
 the batteries are gone and need to be recharged.

 The issue is the duty-cycle of the charger, your going from a 14ah to 100ah
 charge load, the charger has to run 7-times as long to fully charge the
 batteries, this may work fine with some higher end UPS, and some it might
 burn up the charger.

 Another thing to make note of, is that most UPS systems run an internal 24V
 system, and not a 12V system, so be SURE which one you're dealing with
 before you start any modifications.

 We're in process of developing our own remote-site power solution.
 Everything we've found is either too big physically, requiring expensive
 outdoor enclosures, or doesn't have the run-time we desire, or is too
 expensive.

 I think we've got the basic design down, we're adding things like a local
 power input option, so that in a long extended outage we can drop the
 generator off to charge the batteries and run the system, and when the
 utility power is restored, it will switch back automatically.

 We're also looking into a direct 12v input from a vehicle cigarette lighter
 output, or additional external batteries.

 Would anyone have any interest in this when we get it complete?

 Thanks,

 Russ Kreigh
 Network Engineer
 OnlyInternet.Net
 Supernova Technologies



 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
 Behalf Of paul hendry
 Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2007 12:09 PM
 To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; wireless@wispa.org
 Subject: RE: [WISPA] External battery on UPS

 Scott,

 Surely it should be possible to replace 2 12v 7ah batteries run in
 parallel (not series) with 1 12v 100ah battery as the voltage isn't
 changing? With regards runtime I can just increase the external battery
 count.

 Mac, don't worry I have no intention of putting my tongue on these
 things to see if they charged ;)

 Cheers,

 P.

 -Original Message-
 From: Scott Reed [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Sent: 02 March 2007 12:22
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] External battery on UPS

 The charger is designed for the size and number of batteries in the
 original configuration.  Changing the quantity and/or type of battery
 risks damaging either the charger or the batteries.

 Also, runtime is determined by the batteries, so changing them changes
 the runtime.

 paul hendry wrote:

 Is anyone using external batteries on the larger APC UPS's? I've got

 an

 old Smart-UPS 3000 RM that has 8 x 12v batteries in it. The thing is
 they are wired in a bit of a strange config. It looks to me like they
 are split into 4 sets of 2 batteries running in series then 2 of those



 sets are cabled to the same connector inside the UPS and so there are

 2

 connectors with 4 batteries hanging of each.

 Is there any reason I can't run 2 x 2 (in series) 12v 100ah batteries
 instead of the original 8? I don't seem to be able to and don't really



 want to get another 4 batteries just to discover I can do it with 4.

 Cheers,

 P.

 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]

 On

 Behalf Of Mark Nash - Lists
 Sent: 16 November 2006 16:45
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] External battery on UPS

 I replaced the two internal batteries last night with two external,

 $100

 batteries, and put a load on the UPS that matched the highest load I
 have
 out in the field (80w).  It took 2 Tranzeo APs, an Xpeed SDSL modem,

 and

 a
 19 TV on the QVC to load it up properly.  Now instead of 1 hour I get



 13
 hours.  Bigger, better batteries should net me more time than this.

 My

 goal
 is bang for buck at this stage in my business...more run time for a
 sensible
 price.

 One cool thing about this setup is that I can rig it up to be able to
 simply
 take new batteries out to a site when they are getting low, instead of



 the
 generator.  I can keep some spare batteries charged up and ready to

 go.

 It's a whole lot cheaper and easier than purchasing multiple QUALITY
 1000w
 generators and putting large custom tanks on them.  That is if your

 UPS

 is
 not on the top of a water tower or something. ;)

 Mark Nash
 Network Engineer
 UnwiredOnline.Net
 350 Holly Street
 Junction City, OR 97448
 http://www.uwol.net
 541-998-
 541-998-5599 fax

 - Original Message -
 From: Brian Rohrbacher [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 6:41 PM
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] External battery on UPS




 I'm pasting Gino's link to the right thread.
 Then I can search me email in a year and find the correct thread

 Connectors:

 http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=263-110

 Batteries:

 http://www.donrowe.com/batteries/8a31dt.html



 Brian Rohrbacher wrote:



[WISPA] Place to purchase routers in quanity

2007-03-07 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I am needing to order some customer routers in quanity. I have been
using the linksys wrt54gc and really like them. Do you guys have
suggestions of vendors to use?

Thanks,
_
/-\ ndrew
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Re: [WISPA] Place to purchase routers in quanity

2007-03-07 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

those will do nicely! I order a few of them to try out before I put in
a big order thanks!

On 3/7/07, wispa [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

On Wed, 7 Mar 2007 16:25:06 -0700, Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote

Do you want wireless routers?

http://3btech.net/chwl80wirofo.html

I have been installing these galore, they're FCC certified, and for a cheap
consumer router, have the quick setup, and nice set of access control
features that work real well for a customer side install.

If for some reason the link doesn't work, the part number is wlb-2203.
Tehy're 802.11b only, but that's sufficient for internet use.

Range is excellent, and I've had no failures yet, no lockups and no crashes
that I know of.

And at $18 each including shipping, they beat linkcrap and netcrap
completely.  I've had more issues with failing netgears and buggy linksys
than with ANYTHING else.




 I am needing to order some customer routers in quanity. I have been
 using the linksys wrt54gc and really like them. Do you guys have
 suggestions of vendors to use?

 Thanks,
  _
 /-\ ndrew
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Mark Koskenmaki   Neofast, Inc
Broadband for the Walla Walla Valley and Blue Mountains
541-969-8200

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[WISPA] Signal Propagation through Vinyl??

2007-02-23 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

We are putting together a bid to serve some small kiosk type
buildings. The don't want the antenna on the outside of building.
Instead they would like to put the antenna under it's false roof. The
roof is made of fairly thin vinyl material. Has anybody had any
experience with what a 5.8Ghz signal will do through that? We have
setup a time to test next week but if it is not going to work I don't
even want to waste time writing up a proposal. The sites are all over
town so there will be some long shots that will not work if there is
much signal loss.
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Re: [WISPA] Signal Propagation through Vinyl??

2007-02-23 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

Good that is what I was hopeing to hear.

Thanks Jack,
_
/-\ ndrew

On 2/23/07, Jack Unger [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

You're right to try it; that will provide the information that you need. Most 
likely, the losses will be fairly low.

jack


-Original Message-
From: Andrew Niemantsverdriet [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Feb 23, 2007 10:46 AM
To: wireless@wispa.org
Subject: [WISPA] Signal Propagation through Vinyl??

We are putting together a bid to serve some small kiosk type
buildings. The don't want the antenna on the outside of building.
Instead they would like to put the antenna under it's false roof. The
roof is made of fairly thin vinyl material. Has anybody had any
experience with what a 5.8Ghz signal will do through that? We have
setup a time to test next week but if it is not going to work I don't
even want to waste time writing up a proposal. The sites are all over
town so there will be some long shots that will not work if there is
much signal loss.
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[WISPA] VOIP Suggestions

2007-02-19 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

We are looking to start offering VOIP to our customers. What are your
suggestions to get started? Roll our own? Resell somebody elses? Also
what things should I avoid, or common mistakes?

Thanks for any advice you can give.

_
/-\ ndrew
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Re: [WISPA] VOIP Suggestions

2007-02-19 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

Thanks for the reply Don,

To answer your questions:
1. We are looking at offering service to mostly residential customers
but some small business users have expressed interest. I doubt we will
do any of our large business customers until we get everything
working.

2. The regions that I am looking at are: 406 628 and then the Billings
MT region, these two initially

3. No pricing models yet but judging by competitors $20-$40 / month
for residential is the going rate. This is an all you can eat type
plan. We are hoping to fall in the middle at $30/month but that is all
subject to change.

I do have some experience with Asterisk (we also build PBX's for
business) but I am not sure that is what I want. It seems hard to
scale.

We have not purchased anything yet in terms of hardware. We do have
some parts and pieces laying around as replacement parts for any of
our installed PBX's but most of those are just Digium TDM400p with FXO
modules but I don't think 4 phone lines is going to get us very far :)

So ideally I want something that can sit in our NOC and do the job,
but outsourcing might be the best choice for ease of maintenance. I
can control the traffic all the way to our NOC so I can ensure good
QoS at least to there. Our NOC is located at a Tier 2 provider. We
have tried to partner with them but they said they won't be ready
until this summer. A year ago they said it would be summer 2006. So
basically I am not holding my breath.

On 2/19/07, Don Annas [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

A few thoughts...   :-)

If you are going to roll it out on your own, there are open source products
that is the easiest way to get started and will realistically handle your
first 300-500 users (depending on call ratios).  This is a good entry point
for an ISP that is focusing on residential accounts.  As you scale, using a
true proxy (open source such as SER or a commercial product) will be needed.
Depending on what you have budgeted to kick off your voip project, your time
may be worth skipping the opensource route and looking to outsource or
purchase a canned solution.

Keep in mind that if you start this yourself, you need to make sure that
VoIP is going to be a major piece of your business.  If you think the FCC
filing for a WISP is a pain, wait until you see what the FCC throws you as
an interconnected VoIP provider.  Additionally, you must make provisions for
e911 services, and negotiate origination/termination agreements if you are
not going to be facilities based.

When we started a little over two years ago, the tier 1 vendors wouldn't
even pay attention to us until we passed the 4 million minute per month
mark.  I have seen many startup ITSPs that spent way too much time
negotiating fractions of a cent on origination/termination costs while
neglecting things that mattered more at that point.  It is important that
you utilize the highest quality routes you have available.  Saving a half a
cent a minute doesn't mean that much to a VoIP provider if your minutes are
not that great to begin with.  If you are not facilities based, and you
cannot work directly with a Teir 1 provider, make sure you understand how
the traffic is routed once it hits your provider.  A simple traceroute to a
providers proxy means nothing.

Focus on quality termination for your clients, once your volume is up,
negotiate further discounts.  When it comes to termination/origination, you
get what you pay for as a startup bidding the business out to the lowest
cost per minute provider.

A few questions for you:

- Are you looking to roll VoIP out to residential or business clients
- What regions are you looking to offer VoIP in.  If you have the NPA-NXX it
would be helpful
- What equipment (if any) have you already purchased for this project
- Have you put together any pricing models are do you have an idea what your
local market will accept?


_
Don Annas
336.510.3800 x111
336.510.3801 fax
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.TriadTelecom.com
_



-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Andrew Niemantsverdriet
Sent: Monday, February 19, 2007 9:33 AM
To: wireless@wispa.org
Subject: [WISPA] VOIP Suggestions

We are looking to start offering VOIP to our customers. What are your
suggestions to get started? Roll our own? Resell somebody elses? Also
what things should I avoid, or common mistakes?

Thanks for any advice you can give.

 _
/-\ ndrew
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Re: [WISPA] Alvarion Comnet Radios have arrived

2006-12-22 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

I too am interested in what the minium price would be to put up a POP
using Alvarion gear. I really like my Trango gear but this stuff
sounds awesome and from what I read the Comnet program is just what I
am looking for. To compare to build out a Trango POP it costs about
1600 that includes AP, a switch and a battery backup system. Can
Alvarion get close to this?

On 12/22/06, Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181 [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

It's much closer Patrick.  That's for sure.

Let run some numbers though.

Tranzeo or Inscape Data ap:
$450ish.  Will deliver an honest 3 to 4 megs to almost anyone at ranges up
to 10 miles.  1 to 2 megs out to 15 miles.
Sector antenna, $400.
Or omni and amp, $500 to $700 depending on the quality of the amp and
antenna.
This'll handle roughly 75 to 100 users pretty easily.
If we need 3 sectors we're still at $2500 or so for the whole pop, battery
backup, switch, cables etc.  If we're lucky that'll even include backhaul.

For CPE the cost is gonna be around:
15dB integrated antenna version (good to 3 to 5 miles) $180ish
18dB version (out to around 8 miles) $200ish
$12ish for antenna brackets (I don't buy the cheap ones, only the good ones
from PacWireless)
$10 to $20 for cable ($.15 to $.25 per foot)
Misc. nuts and bolts $20.
We're at $225 $250 per sub plus labor.

Connectorized version, $180ish
24dB grid antenna, $90ish (I don't buy cheap antennas, only Andrew cast
magnesium (same as the Alvarion ones))
Mount, $12
Misc. nuts and bolt, tape etc. $20
Cable, $10 to $20.

This one comes in closer to $350 when it's all said and done.

Believe me, I understand about the long term maintenance costs too.  But
I've got to compete against cable, dsl, fiber to the home or all of the
above in ALL of my population density centers and a lot of my rural areas.

Most of my towers have fewer than 25 users on them.  Many are under 10.
Only a few are anywhere near 50 and one serves around 100.  Last year we
installed over 80 new radios (some of them were for our use, some were
upgrades etc.) and have, so far, around 60 new subs.  This with basically no
marketing effort at all, and in the face of amazing competition.  Per
customer there are VERY few out there that have more competitive services.

Our network now spans around 6000 square miles.  It's taken over 20 sites
with nearly 30 ap's to do this.  Our growth potential is really good.  But
not in all areas, some areas there just aren't any homes, so there won't be
any more customers coming.

We are NOT running business grade services on anyone's wifi gear.  Today
we're using Trango.  $1200ish per ap and $300ish per cpe (averaged out).
They'll deliver 8 to 9 megs of real world throughput right out of the box.
Great security and flexibility.

Alvarion has been loyal to WISPA and Trango's still not here though.  I want
to go play with the new Alvarion gear, I don't have any single area with
enough growth to keep me in the program though.  Even with resi. customers
tossed in.  If I were in Spokane, Seattle, Yakima etc. it would be a no
brainer for me.  The interference robustness, the scalability, the
upgradeability etc. all make this a much more cut and dried decision.
Especially the inference issues.  I look at what we fight with out here with
relatively few alien devices in the air.  How guys like Forbes keep their
customers running is a mystery to me.  The manpower overhead has to be a
killer.

How do those numbers compare with a similar VL solution  Help me find a
way to justify the big boy toys.  Trust me, the idea that I'd not need to do
any work on my network appeals to me more and more with every new customer.
But we're still taking care of things with 1.75 people and I spend an
average of 25% to 30% of my day on these lists and other WISPA type duties
so I probably really only count for a 3/4 time person.  If I'd totally
automate my billing, get rid of my time on the lists and forward the office
calls to my cell phone I could probably do this with one person.  (saving
around $17,000 per year in payroll)  But who wants to work that hard
forever?  And Mary is much nicer on the phone than I am :-).

Have a great Christmas!
Marlon
(509) 982-2181   Equipment sales
(408) 907-6910 (Vonage)Consulting services
42846865 (icq)And I run my own wisp!
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam


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Re: [WISPA] bits per mbps

2006-12-22 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

How are you guys tracking usage? What program are you using to measure
it and are you measureing every bit or an average?

On 12/22/06, Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

I have not had the guts to do what Marlon does. But that doesn't mean there
isn't merit in his method.
Part of the reason is we put in place technology that allows the use of
available bandwdith with limited impact to other users, therefore taking
away some of the need to charge for it, if it was jsut going unused any way.
in otherwords Bandwdith allocated on a fair weighted queuing priority basis.

The advatnage of Marlon's model, is he has the data to pick and chose
customers. The high bandwdith hogs gets given to the competition or pay.
The second a network starts reaching capacity and the market penetration
doesn't, it becomes feasible to be happy not keeping all customers, instead
you pick the most profitable customers.  The facts are the the network
supports it or it doesn't, the provider can afford to upgrade or they can't.
What I'm learning is, selling 10mbps peak speeds allows you to play the
Comcast game, and beat them at it.

I'm selling unlimited now, but its important to track the usage. That might
have to change, as people start using the links to replace their VCRs. The
reality is, eventuality one will have to port limit or charge per bit.  I'm
jsut avoiding that day until it has to happen, so I don't lose customers for
the greater good, unless I have to.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message -
From: David E. Smith [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2006 4:42 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] bits per mbps


 Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181 wrote:

 First, I have to figure out how many kbps a gig of download would be.
 Specifically, I've got a couple of customers doing 50 gigs per month.
 How many kbps does it take to generate that?

 Assuming a month is 30 days (nice round number), 50GB/month is about
 161kbps, all the time. That's the equivalent of, say, leaving a
 high-quality streaming radio station running, or a low-quality video
 feed like gbs.tv.

 I'm staying out of the rest of the discussion, because I'm violently
 allergic to pay-by-the-bit pricing. It may make good sense to the
 bookkeeper, but with streaming media (YouTube, Google Video), big
 downloadable media (iTunes movies, Amazon Unbox), and giant software
 downloads (World of Warcraft and just about every other MMORPG) becoming
 more prevalent, I think it's just gonna seriously annoy your users in
 the long term.

 David Smith
 MVN.net
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Re: [WISPA] Trying to block Stock Spam

2006-10-18 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

If you have spamassassin setup and running you can just add the rules
shown on the spamassassin wiki. You need to have imagemagick and gocr
but they are really easy to install.

See the wiki page:
http://wiki.apache.org/spamassassin/OcrPlugin

On 10/18/06, Carl A Jeptha [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Ok spill the beans about the ocr, don't let me get to you to beat it out
of you. (OOOPPPS did I say that out loud ) :-[

Please give more info as this is the means of doing spam now.

You have a Good Day now,


Carl A Jeptha
http://www.airnet.ca
Office Phone: 905 349-2084
Office Hours: 9:00am - 5:00pm
skype cajeptha



Andrew Niemantsverdriet wrote:
 Just use spamAssassin with an OCR plugin it does wonders :)

 On 10/17/06, rwf [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Hi Marlon-

 We use ASSP. It works great, but it fails a bit at the stock spam
 that has
 been coming out lately. It is almost entirely a graphic with no readable
 text.
 I figure that the 300+ it kills from just my business and personal Email
 accounts is justification for deleting 1-2 graphical ones a day.

 How does postini filter the graphical spam?

 Ralph


 -Original Message-
 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
 Behalf Of Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181
 Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2006 12:36 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Trying to block Stock Spam

 our postini is doing a pretty good job.


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Re: [WISPA] Trying to block Stock Spam

2006-10-17 Thread Andrew Niemantsverdriet

Just use spamAssassin with an OCR plugin it does wonders :)

On 10/17/06, rwf [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

Hi Marlon-

We use ASSP. It works great, but it fails a bit at the stock spam that has
been coming out lately. It is almost entirely a graphic with no readable
text.
I figure that the 300+ it kills from just my business and personal Email
accounts is justification for deleting 1-2 graphical ones a day.

How does postini filter the graphical spam?

Ralph


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181
Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2006 12:36 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Trying to block Stock Spam

our postini is doing a pretty good job.


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