Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread Mark Koskenmaki
I can only imagine.


+++
neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East Washington
email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net

- Original Message - 
From: John Scrivner [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 4:39 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition


 Here is an idea for a federal policy plan to end the broadband access
 problems. How about Base Station Licenses instead of 10,000 square mile
 licenses like we do now. Anyone could buy a Base Station License. Heaven
 forbid a regular person should be allowed to compete with a Megasuck.net
 RBOC! Someday I will share with all of you what it is like to be part of
 the license auction system as I just went through in the AWS auction.
 Root canals are more fun.
 Scriv


 Mark Koskenmaki wrote:

 - Original Message - 
 
 From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 11:19 AM
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition
 
 
 
 
 It is a lack of federal policy. Every nation that has a federal policy
 on teelcom/BB/internet has strong penetration and competition - and
 cheaper rates. Granted there are lots of debates about why some
 countries are cheaper, and have more users, but the fact remains that
 the FCC has failed - FAILED - in its charge of ensuring competition and
 upholding the Telecom Act of 1996. Heck, they don't even enforce merger
 requirements nor spectrum purchase requirements.
 
 Without a clear plan, laser focus, and habitual execution, you usually
 have failure.
 
 
 
 The notion that the federal government can actually create a policy or
 program to provide something that is better than free enterprise is
absurd
 on it's face, and evidence suggests that is the worst possible means of
 attempting to do anything.
 
 I will agree that  there have been a lot of federal failures, but they
 relate to over-regulation, the creation of monopolies, and a failure at
 being good stewards of the public trust.   Add this all up, and you have
to
 wonder why on earth people think the federal government should EVER be
 considered as being responsible for much of anything in our daily lives.
 
 
 
 
 
 - Peter
 
 
 Mark Koskenmaki wrote:
 
 
 
 I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
 biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY
 
 Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread Dawn DiPietro

Mark,

As quoted;

   Income is, of course, a factor in broadband 
adoption. As the table on page three shows,
   15% of those who live in households with income 
under $30,000 annually have
   broadband compared with 57% of those in households 
whose incomes exceed $75,000
   annually. But the data do show that broadband is no 
longer just the province of upper-

   income Americans.

www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Broadband_trends2006.pdf

Those dreaded facts! ;-)

Regards,
Dawn DiPietro


Mark Koskenmaki wrote:


My experience has been that income has almost no relationship to whether or
not someone wants and gets high-speed internet.

I know people who drive new trucks and bmw's and won't spring for high speed
internet.   And others who have to scrape it together nickel by nickel who
do.

And, in my area, at least, there's well past 25% who simply don't have a
computer, much less want internet.


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neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East Washington
email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net


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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread Tom DeReggi

I don't disagree that many people choose Dial UP by Choice.
I'm just saying that 30% of America does not.
I don't have data on this, but neither does any one else, so of course it is 
speculation.
I also think its a sales problem. Better sales and marketing targeted to the 
Dial Up user would also contribute to changing this.
For example, how many parents knowthere are parental control home routers 
that can restrict usage by time of day?
For example, I revently converted some DialUP users to Wireless, and had 
been marketing DSL Wireless to them for years, unsuccessfully.
They replied, I got the flyers regularly but never called, because I knew 
DSL didn't exist in my area, from past experience, and thought it was just 
unqualified marketing.
I didn't realize Wireless was a different technology to get signal to the 
home, and thought it was referring to Indoor wireless router.

My point is that statistical data is flawed for those type of reasons.

The big kicker is that many keep Dial Up for mobility. As WIFI and FREE 
broadband in Hotels and such, and broadband in every home gets closer to be 
met, and Email by Cell Phone,  the need for Mobile Dial Up starts to 
diminish.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2006 12:27 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition



Tom DeReggi wrote:


Peter,

 Other figures from research firms like Forrester
show that only about 40% of Americans have high-speed connections at
home, 30% rely on dial-up and 25% don’t have any Internet connections at
all!

I do not disagree with those statistics. I disagree with your statement 
that most DialUp users are DialUp users by choice, and that most people 
that don't have Internet are doing so by choice.


I think you are inferring there, but I know several people who keep 
dial-up (mostly with AOL) because of the pain of change, including my 
sister, who could get SBC DSL by Yahoo for less than her AOL account.  So 
yeah many are on it on purpose.  A buddy keeps dial-up at home so his kids 
will not get addicted and be on MySpace all night. Again on purpose he has 
dial-up.


The facts are, 60% of America is under served, which is both embaressing 
for the US, and a call for opportunity.  In todays world, there is 
justification for every home in America to have broadband and to have a 
computer.  Not having a computer, is no longer a valid arguement. Even 
the most impoverished homes, can manage to budget to buy a $300 computer 
from BestBuy, that includes monitor and printer.


Yeah. People on welfare buy PC's. They buy Xbox. It's a status and social 
thing. But I won't write a thesis on it. Again this is from personal 
experience.


Or for that matter to get a FREE used donated computer.  A pentium pc, 
does Broadband fine (although slow and problematic).  The reason people 
do not buy broadband, is NOT price. It doesn't need to be cheaper. There 
is already cost justification, the end user just doesn't always realize 
it at first.  Understanding that the Average DialUp user is paying $35 a 
month already (line and service).  The problem is that broadband is to 
cheap.  So large players can't justify expansion into lower profit 
centers, by subsidees of higher paying subs.  The problem is that users 
DO NOT HAVE OPTIONS.  USERS HAVE NOT BEEN SOLICITED WITH PROPER SALES AND 
MARKETING TO CONVINCE THEM THEY NEED IT, BECAUE IT IS POINTLESS WHEN IT 
IS NOT AVAILABLE.


I think the duopoly is doing a great job of marketing and lowering the 
ARPU to get everyone on the internet.
But I am still amazed when I ask people for an email - and they don't have 
one!


- Peter
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread Tom DeReggi

The only thing that I forgot about is

Broadband may actually increase the sales of DialUP.  So a higher market 
share of BRoadband does not mean a lower market share of DialUP.
Everyone needs a Dial UP for redundancy, when their main broadband goes 
down, which it eventually will, since its a commodity low cost service now.
As people have Broadband, the more they train themselves to rely on it, and 
the bigger the need they have a backup.


So any statistic that does not ask,  How Many broadband connection types do 
you have in your home, is flawed.
Just like people having more than one TV in the home, they have more than 
one communication device in their home.
We have 4 cell phones in our house, (Mine, Wifes, AuPairs, Spare).  Two 
phone services (Verizon Analog, and VOIP).
The same will likely happen with Broadband. More and More businesses will 
have more than one broadband connection.


The cheaper it gets the more likely two connections will be had. A reason 
that proves cost is not what is preventing broadband, they end up spending 
the same amount and getting two for the old price of one.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2006 12:27 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition



Tom DeReggi wrote:


Peter,

 Other figures from research firms like Forrester
show that only about 40% of Americans have high-speed connections at
home, 30% rely on dial-up and 25% don’t have any Internet connections at
all!

I do not disagree with those statistics. I disagree with your statement 
that most DialUp users are DialUp users by choice, and that most people 
that don't have Internet are doing so by choice.


I think you are inferring there, but I know several people who keep 
dial-up (mostly with AOL) because of the pain of change, including my 
sister, who could get SBC DSL by Yahoo for less than her AOL account.  So 
yeah many are on it on purpose.  A buddy keeps dial-up at home so his kids 
will not get addicted and be on MySpace all night. Again on purpose he has 
dial-up.


The facts are, 60% of America is under served, which is both embaressing 
for the US, and a call for opportunity.  In todays world, there is 
justification for every home in America to have broadband and to have a 
computer.  Not having a computer, is no longer a valid arguement. Even 
the most impoverished homes, can manage to budget to buy a $300 computer 
from BestBuy, that includes monitor and printer.


Yeah. People on welfare buy PC's. They buy Xbox. It's a status and social 
thing. But I won't write a thesis on it. Again this is from personal 
experience.


Or for that matter to get a FREE used donated computer.  A pentium pc, 
does Broadband fine (although slow and problematic).  The reason people 
do not buy broadband, is NOT price. It doesn't need to be cheaper. There 
is already cost justification, the end user just doesn't always realize 
it at first.  Understanding that the Average DialUp user is paying $35 a 
month already (line and service).  The problem is that broadband is to 
cheap.  So large players can't justify expansion into lower profit 
centers, by subsidees of higher paying subs.  The problem is that users 
DO NOT HAVE OPTIONS.  USERS HAVE NOT BEEN SOLICITED WITH PROPER SALES AND 
MARKETING TO CONVINCE THEM THEY NEED IT, BECAUE IT IS POINTLESS WHEN IT 
IS NOT AVAILABLE.


I think the duopoly is doing a great job of marketing and lowering the 
ARPU to get everyone on the internet.
But I am still amazed when I ask people for an email - and they don't have 
one!


- Peter
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread Tom DeReggi

Scriv,Congrads on the spectrum win.

What are you doing about equipment to operate in that spectrum range?

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Mark Koskenmaki [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2006 2:55 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition



I can only imagine.


+++
neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East 
Washington

email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net

- Original Message - 
From: John Scrivner [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 4:39 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition



Here is an idea for a federal policy plan to end the broadband access
problems. How about Base Station Licenses instead of 10,000 square mile
licenses like we do now. Anyone could buy a Base Station License. Heaven
forbid a regular person should be allowed to compete with a Megasuck.net
RBOC! Someday I will share with all of you what it is like to be part of
the license auction system as I just went through in the AWS auction.
Root canals are more fun.
Scriv


Mark Koskenmaki wrote:

- Original Message - 


From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 11:19 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition




It is a lack of federal policy. Every nation that has a federal policy
on teelcom/BB/internet has strong penetration and competition - and
cheaper rates. Granted there are lots of debates about why some
countries are cheaper, and have more users, but the fact remains that
the FCC has failed - FAILED - in its charge of ensuring competition and
upholding the Telecom Act of 1996. Heck, they don't even enforce merger
requirements nor spectrum purchase requirements.

Without a clear plan, laser focus, and habitual execution, you usually
have failure.



The notion that the federal government can actually create a policy or
program to provide something that is better than free enterprise is

absurd

on it's face, and evidence suggests that is the worst possible means of
attempting to do anything.

I will agree that  there have been a lot of federal failures, but they
relate to over-regulation, the creation of monopolies, and a failure at
being good stewards of the public trust.   Add this all up, and you have

to

wonder why on earth people think the federal government should EVER be
considered as being responsible for much of anything in our daily lives.





- Peter


Mark Koskenmaki wrote:



I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this... 
The

biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY

Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...





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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16thAmong IndustrializedNations

2006-09-21 Thread Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181
I think what we really need is more telecommuting.  That will help drop out 
dependence on petrol, reduce the loads on the roads, save hours per day for 
some folks, help moms stay home with the kids etc.  I think it would also 
help de-urbanize the country and make it much harder for terrorists to do 
such large damage.  It would also help people be safer (crime is usually 
lower in the country).


I think that telecommuting will be the next really big ap that hits.
Marlon
(509) 982-2181   Equipment sales
(408) 907-6910 (Vonage)Consulting services
42846865 (icq)And I run my own wisp!
64.146.146.12 (net meeting)
www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam



- Original Message - 
From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 11:14 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16thAmong 
IndustrializedNations



We are actually at the point where about 68% of the US population has 
Internet.

The rest don't own a computer or do not want Internet.

Some of that 68% is still on dial-up. For some it is a price thing. For 
some it is not understanding technology. For some it is to make the 
experience painful to avoid wasting hours on the internet.


So dropping the price - as SBC and VZ have experienced - to sub-$15 gets 
you some dial-up conversions. But when the price returns to normal, some 
switch back to cheaper dial-up.


The dilemma becomes How do you get more internet appliance (PC's, laptops, 
PDAs, internet terminal) penetration?


The marketing question is: What Remarkable  Useful things can you do with 
broadband (other than entertainment)?


That's my 2 cents.

Peter @ RAD-INFO, Inc.

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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition LeavesU.S.16th Among IndustrializedNations

2006-09-21 Thread Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181
Not at all true Tom.  We still have almost as many dialup users as we do 
broadband.  And many of those dialup users CAN get access to broadband. 
Often at a rate below what they are spending on dialup.


Don't ask me why the won't switch, I don't have an answer.  But it's 
still a fact of life out here in the real world.


People usually (I'd guess at least 50%) don't go broadband because they 
don't want/care about it.


Marlon
(509) 982-2181   Equipment sales
(408) 907-6910 (Vonage)Consulting services
42846865 (icq)And I run my own wisp!
64.146.146.12 (net meeting)
www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam



- Original Message - 
From: Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2006 4:39 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition LeavesU.S.16th Among 
IndustrializedNations




Peter,

I do not agree with those statistics.
Why would anyone prefer DialUp for the same price? Don't think so.
A large part of that 68% are DialUp Users NOT by choice.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: George Rogato [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 7:49 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S.16th Among 
IndustrializedNations




Peter R. wrote:
We are actually at the point where about 68% of the US population has 
Internet.

The rest don't own a computer or do not want Internet.

Some of that 68% is still on dial-up. For some it is a price thing. For 
some it is not understanding technology. For some it is to make the 
experience painful to avoid wasting hours on the internet.


So dropping the price - as SBC and VZ have experienced - to sub-$15 gets 
you some dial-up conversions. But when the price returns to normal, some 
switch back to cheaper dial-up.


The dilemma becomes How do you get more internet appliance (PC's, 
laptops, PDAs, internet terminal) penetration?


The marketing question is: What Remarkable  Useful things can you do 
with broadband (other than entertainment)?


That's my 2 cents.

Peter @ RAD-INFO, Inc.



I agree with you, I still have a considerable amount of dial up 
subscribers.


There needs to be a motivator, other than price, that makes these types 
of users decide to trade up. They have to want to.


And I thought giant pictures killing  their email would have done the 
trick by now :(


George

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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread John Scrivner


Tom DeReggi wrote:


Scriv,Congrads on the spectrum win.


Thank you.



What are you doing about equipment to operate in that spectrum range?


That is the $100,000 question right now. 802.16e for mobility and fixed 
wireless is designed strictly for TDD use. I have paired frequencies 
which are generally relegated to some type of FDD system like those used 
in the cellular industry. There are some next gen choices in that area 
that I am looking at. I personally believe someone will adapt 802.16e to 
work in FDD whether it is standards compliant or not. Then I will likely 
choose that. I could use 802.16d gear like BreezeMax but I really want 
to offer mobility as well as fixed which is not an option with 802.16d. 
Nortel is working on me pretty hard right now. We'll see where this 
goes. It is going to be a while before I can get the incumbent users of 
my bands relocated so I have some time to ponder.

Scriv



Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16thAmong IndustrializedNations

2006-09-21 Thread Travis Johnson

Marlon,

Shouldn't that actually be wirelesscommuting or wificommuniting or 
wommuting? :)


Travis
Microserv

Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181 wrote:

I think what we really need is more telecommuting.  That will help 
drop out dependence on petrol, reduce the loads on the roads, save 
hours per day for some folks, help moms stay home with the kids etc.  
I think it would also help de-urbanize the country and make it much 
harder for terrorists to do such large damage.  It would also help 
people be safer (crime is usually lower in the country).


I think that telecommuting will be the next really big ap that hits.
Marlon
(509) 982-2181   Equipment sales
(408) 907-6910 (Vonage)Consulting services
42846865 (icq)And I run my own wisp!
64.146.146.12 (net meeting)
www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam



- Original Message - From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 11:14 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16thAmong 
IndustrializedNations



We are actually at the point where about 68% of the US population has 
Internet.

The rest don't own a computer or do not want Internet.

Some of that 68% is still on dial-up. For some it is a price thing. 
For some it is not understanding technology. For some it is to make 
the experience painful to avoid wasting hours on the internet.


So dropping the price - as SBC and VZ have experienced - to sub-$15 
gets you some dial-up conversions. But when the price returns to 
normal, some switch back to cheaper dial-up.


The dilemma becomes How do you get more internet appliance (PC's, 
laptops, PDAs, internet terminal) penetration?


The marketing question is: What Remarkable  Useful things can you do 
with broadband (other than entertainment)?


That's my 2 cents.

Peter @ RAD-INFO, Inc.

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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread Matt Liotta
I wouldn't think you would be required to use FDD. 802.16e supports 
varying channel widths, so you could for example deploy a multi-point 
system with two 10Mhz channels or six 3Mhz channels all TDD.


-Matt

John Scrivner wrote:


Tom DeReggi wrote:


Scriv,Congrads on the spectrum win.


Thank you.



What are you doing about equipment to operate in that spectrum range?


That is the $100,000 question right now. 802.16e for mobility and 
fixed wireless is designed strictly for TDD use. I have paired 
frequencies which are generally relegated to some type of FDD system 
like those used in the cellular industry. There are some next gen 
choices in that area that I am looking at. I personally believe 
someone will adapt 802.16e to work in FDD whether it is standards 
compliant or not. Then I will likely choose that. I could use 802.16d 
gear like BreezeMax but I really want to offer mobility as well as 
fixed which is not an option with 802.16d. Nortel is working on me 
pretty hard right now. We'll see where this goes. It is going to be a 
while before I can get the incumbent users of my bands relocated so I 
have some time to ponder.

Scriv



Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband



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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-21 Thread John Scrivner
The NTIA only allows the use of the 1710 to 1720 MHz band that I now 
have in CMA401 to be used with a max EIRP for the system (radio plus 
antenna) of 1 watt and a max height above average terrain of 30 feet. 
Their is NO practical use of 1710 to 1720 MHz as a tower base station 
frequency, period. It can ONLY be used at client ends. The base station 
end has to be in the 2110 to 2120 MHz band which can transmit at 
hundreds of watts EIRP. These unbalanced power levels may make this look 
like a dead deal for 1710 to 1720 for any use but remember that all PCS 
client radios (cell phones) operate at far below 1 watt EIRP. AWS can 
work as a broadband platform but only as a FDD based system. It also 
probably means that a different modulation scheme will be required for 
the client to base path because of the skewed power levels which 
probably means assymetrical bandwidth offerings.


I can live with that if it means I can serve everyone inside a given 
geography without running signal tests all the time. I want to sell 
customers a card or a phone or a PDA and be done with it. That is the 
whole reason to do this kind of a deal. Truck rolls are killing this 
industry from my perspective. We need to build networks that just work 
everyplace without having to do installations at every single customer 
location. That is the dream I am hoping to experience. I'll let you know 
how well that works out after a few million in Capex and a few years 
getting it all built. Wish me luck. I'll need it.   :-)

Scriv


Matt Liotta wrote:

I wouldn't think you would be required to use FDD. 802.16e supports 
varying channel widths, so you could for example deploy a multi-point 
system with two 10Mhz channels or six 3Mhz channels all TDD.


-Matt

John Scrivner wrote:



Tom DeReggi wrote:


Scriv,Congrads on the spectrum win.



Thank you.



What are you doing about equipment to operate in that spectrum range?



That is the $100,000 question right now. 802.16e for mobility and 
fixed wireless is designed strictly for TDD use. I have paired 
frequencies which are generally relegated to some type of FDD system 
like those used in the cellular industry. There are some next gen 
choices in that area that I am looking at. I personally believe 
someone will adapt 802.16e to work in FDD whether it is standards 
compliant or not. Then I will likely choose that. I could use 802.16d 
gear like BreezeMax but I really want to offer mobility as well as 
fixed which is not an option with 802.16d. Nortel is working on me 
pretty hard right now. We'll see where this goes. It is going to be a 
while before I can get the incumbent users of my bands relocated so I 
have some time to ponder.

Scriv



Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband




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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Peter R.

Which stat don't you like Tom?

The PEW Report:
http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Digital_Divisions_Oct_5_2005.pdf
As of May-June 2005, 68% of American adults, or about 137 million 
people, use the
internet, up from 63% one year ago. Thirty-two percent of American 
adults, or about 65
million people, do not use the internet and not always by choice. 
Certain groups continue
to lag in their internet adoption, including Americans age 65 and older, 
African-

Americans, and those with less education.

Numbers vary depending on the poll/survey/source.

From America's Network:

Some 62 million Americans are still using their telephone lines to dial 
into the Internet, according to recent figures from the Pew Internet and 
American Life Project. Other figures from research firms like Forrester 
show that only about 40% of Americans have high-speed connections at 
home, 30% rely on dial-up and 25% don’t have any Internet connections at 
all!


So how come the US is lagging behind most of the developed world in 
broadband access? Some analysts cite price as a factor, but that seems 
doubtful. DSL deals from Verizon and ATT often are priced below monthly 
dial-up rates, and millions of cable television customers can get 
cable-modem service packaged at a discount with their TV and phone 
service. So why stick with slow dialup?


The main problem seems to be the free-market telecom frenzy that has 
enveloped the US (and much of its population) in technology and price 
uncertainty. With no national broadband policy in place, multiple 
service providers are targeting affluent urban areas, while leaving many 
poor and rural dwellers to fend for themselves. In big cities, that 
means consumers face daunting broadband choices. Should they sign a 
contract with their cable provider or telco? Wait for the installation 
of a Wi-Fi network? Choose an alternate provider like EarthLink? And 
which broadband technology is the best? Many just stick with what they 
know best: the slow but reliable telephone.


Even the service providers themselves are confused. A plan by the city 
of West Hollywood, Calif. to install Wi-Fi has stalled for two years 
because the local utility company can’t decide whether to grant a 
right-of-way for the equipment on its lampposts.


Inevitably, this is going to change, but the change would come much more 
quickly if a national policy and direction were put into place, 
consumers knew what to expect and the service providers better focused 
their efforts. Until then, Americans will have another reason to worry 
about the rise of China.


-

Doesn't matter if you like or believe the numbers. The fact is that 
Broadband growth has stalled. So ISPs have to find out why (fear, tired 
on PC troubles, too much crap, don't need the internet, no PC to use) in 
order to have growth in those flattened or no-growth areas.


- Peter
http://radinfo.blogspot.com/2006/09/broadband-policy.html

Tom DeReggi wrote:


Peter,

I do not agree with those statistics.
Why would anyone prefer DialUp for the same price? Don't think so.
A large part of that 68% are DialUp Users NOT by choice.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - From: George Rogato [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 7:49 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S.16th Among 
IndustrializedNations




Peter R. wrote:

We are actually at the point where about 68% of the US population 
has Internet.

The rest don't own a computer or do not want Internet.

Some of that 68% is still on dial-up. For some it is a price thing. 
For some it is not understanding technology. For some it is to make 
the experience painful to avoid wasting hours on the internet.


So dropping the price - as SBC and VZ have experienced - to sub-$15 
gets you some dial-up conversions. But when the price returns to 
normal, some switch back to cheaper dial-up.


The dilemma becomes How do you get more internet appliance (PC's, 
laptops, PDAs, internet terminal) penetration?


The marketing question is: What Remarkable  Useful things can you 
do with broadband (other than entertainment)?


That's my 2 cents.

Peter @ RAD-INFO, Inc.



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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Peter R.
It is a lack of federal policy. Every nation that has a federal policy 
on teelcom/BB/internet has strong penetration and competition - and 
cheaper rates. Granted there are lots of debates about why some 
countries are cheaper, and have more users, but the fact remains that 
the FCC has failed - FAILED - in its charge of ensuring competition and 
upholding the Telecom Act of 1996. Heck, they don't even enforce merger 
requirements nor spectrum purchase requirements.


Without a clear plan, laser focus, and habitual execution, you usually 
have failure.


- Peter


Mark Koskenmaki wrote:


I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY

Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...

 


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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Peter R.
It is a lack of federal policy. Every nation that has a federal policy 
on telecom/BB/internet has strong penetration and competition - and 
cheaper rates. Granted there are lots of debates about why some 
countries are cheaper, and have more users, but the fact remains that 
the FCC has failed - FAILED - in its charge of ensuring competition and 
upholding the Telecom Act of 1996. Heck, they don't even enforce merger 
requirements nor spectrum purchase requirements.


Without a clear plan, laser focus, and habitual execution, you usually 
have failure.


- Peter


Mark Koskenmaki wrote:


I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY

Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...

 


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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread cw
Disparaging remarks of this nature are dysfunctional. Opinions are like 
assholes; everybody has one but nobody wants to hear it. - cw


Mark Koskenmaki wrote:

I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY

Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...



+++
neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East Washington
email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net




The main problem seems to be the free-market telecom frenzy that has
enveloped the US (and much of its population) in technology and price
uncertainty. With no national broadband policy in place, multiple
service providers are targeting affluent urban areas, while leaving many
poor and rural dwellers to fend for themselves. In big cities, that
means consumers face daunting broadband choices. Should they sign a
contract with their cable provider or telco? Wait for the installation
of a Wi-Fi network? Choose an alternate provider like EarthLink? And
which broadband technology is the best? Many just stick with what they
know best: the slow but reliable telephone.

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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Robert Kim Wireless Internet Advisor

I've got an anal sphincter too!
http://wimax-coverage.com/wimax-access-wireless-internet-service-why.html
two words:
Qual-Comm
=)
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http://wireless-internet-access-provider.com
http://wimax-coverage.com
2611 S. Pacific Coast Highway 101
Suite 203
Cardiff by the Sea, CA 92007
206 984 0880
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Robert Kim Wireless Internet Advisor

ps... i guess i shoulda quoted the last post... oops!

Disparaging remarks of this nature are dysfunctional. Opinions are like
assholes; everybody has one but nobody wants to hear it. - cw

On 9/20/06, Robert Kim Wireless Internet Advisor [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

I've got an anal sphincter too!
http://wimax-coverage.com/wimax-access-wireless-internet-service-why.html
two words:
Qual-Comm
=)
--
Robert Q Kim, Internet Advisor Provider
http://wireless-internet-access-provider.com
http://wimax-coverage.com
2611 S. Pacific Coast Highway 101
Suite 203
Cardiff by the Sea, CA 92007
206 984 0880




--
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http://wireless-internet-access-provider.com
http://wireless-internet-broadband-service.com
2611 S. Pacific Coast Highway 101
Suite 203
Cardiff by the Sea, CA 92007
206 984 0880
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Mark Koskenmaki

- Original Message - 

From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 11:19 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition


 It is a lack of federal policy. Every nation that has a federal policy
 on teelcom/BB/internet has strong penetration and competition - and
 cheaper rates. Granted there are lots of debates about why some
 countries are cheaper, and have more users, but the fact remains that
 the FCC has failed - FAILED - in its charge of ensuring competition and
 upholding the Telecom Act of 1996. Heck, they don't even enforce merger
 requirements nor spectrum purchase requirements.

 Without a clear plan, laser focus, and habitual execution, you usually
 have failure.

The notion that the federal government can actually create a policy or
program to provide something that is better than free enterprise is absurd
on it's face, and evidence suggests that is the worst possible means of
attempting to do anything.

I will agree that  there have been a lot of federal failures, but they
relate to over-regulation, the creation of monopolies, and a failure at
being good stewards of the public trust.   Add this all up, and you have to
wonder why on earth people think the federal government should EVER be
considered as being responsible for much of anything in our daily lives.




 - Peter


 Mark Koskenmaki wrote:

 I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
 biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY
 
 Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...
 
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Tom DeReggi
 company.  Every local government should 
be asking themselves, who is in town and how many of them can we help 
and in what way.  Because these are the guys that care about their local 
town, and know their towns first hand.

The day this happens, the politics and public deception will be over.

It will take a long time for the small independant provider to tackle the 
problem alone. But if the governement had the guts to start spending 
consumers tax dollars to help the army of small providers help the 
consumers, it could happen a lot faster.  They need to stop begging money 
and help from the big companies, and use tax dollars whats it for, helping 
the people.  If they spent just a fraction of what they budget for Public 
Safety and Homeland security, to help small providers, the problem would be 
solved.  Dial Users would quickly start to switch to their friendly local 
broadband provider.  The problem today, is the Urban is handled by default, 
RUS handles the lowest 1% of the market, but the other 59% of them go 
unrepresented.


If the small providers had the help, they could easilly do the volume that 
is needed to encourage manufacturers to built better cheaper gear.  And with 
better cheaper gear, ISPs could develop value propositions to make broadband 
affordable to convert Dial Up from.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - 
From: Peter R. [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, September 20, 2006 9:58 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition



Which stat don't you like Tom?

The PEW Report:
http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Digital_Divisions_Oct_5_2005.pdf
As of May-June 2005, 68% of American adults, or about 137 million people, 
use the
internet, up from 63% one year ago. Thirty-two percent of American adults, 
or about 65
million people, do not use the internet and not always by choice. Certain 
groups continue
to lag in their internet adoption, including Americans age 65 and older, 
African-

Americans, and those with less education.

Numbers vary depending on the poll/survey/source.

From America's Network:

Some 62 million Americans are still using their telephone lines to dial 
into the Internet, according to recent figures from the Pew Internet and 
American Life Project. Other figures from research firms like Forrester 
show that only about 40% of Americans have high-speed connections at home, 
30% rely on dial-up and 25% don’t have any Internet connections at all!


So how come the US is lagging behind most of the developed world in 
broadband access? Some analysts cite price as a factor, but that seems 
doubtful. DSL deals from Verizon and ATT often are priced below monthly 
dial-up rates, and millions of cable television customers can get 
cable-modem service packaged at a discount with their TV and phone 
service. So why stick with slow dialup?


The main problem seems to be the free-market telecom frenzy that has 
enveloped the US (and much of its population) in technology and price 
uncertainty. With no national broadband policy in place, multiple service 
providers are targeting affluent urban areas, while leaving many poor and 
rural dwellers to fend for themselves. In big cities, that means consumers 
face daunting broadband choices. Should they sign a contract with their 
cable provider or telco? Wait for the installation of a Wi-Fi network? 
Choose an alternate provider like EarthLink? And which broadband 
technology is the best? Many just stick with what they know best: the slow 
but reliable telephone.


Even the service providers themselves are confused. A plan by the city of 
West Hollywood, Calif. to install Wi-Fi has stalled for two years because 
the local utility company can’t decide whether to grant a right-of-way for 
the equipment on its lampposts.


Inevitably, this is going to change, but the change would come much more 
quickly if a national policy and direction were put into place, consumers 
knew what to expect and the service providers better focused their 
efforts. Until then, Americans will have another reason to worry about the 
rise of China.


-

Doesn't matter if you like or believe the numbers. The fact is that 
Broadband growth has stalled. So ISPs have to find out why (fear, tired on 
PC troubles, too much crap, don't need the internet, no PC to use) in 
order to have growth in those flattened or no-growth areas.


- Peter
http://radinfo.blogspot.com/2006/09/broadband-policy.html

Tom DeReggi wrote:


Peter,

I do not agree with those statistics.
Why would anyone prefer DialUp for the same price? Don't think so.
A large part of that 68% are DialUp Users NOT by choice.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


- Original Message - From: George Rogato [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]; WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 7:49 PM
Subject: Re

Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Sam Tetherow
Wow, if they really believe that, I wonder how they expect the American 
public to buy a car?  Gee, Ford, Chevy, GMC, KIA, Toyota, Subaru ...

Econo, Sedan, Van, SUV, Pickup ...
Sheesh, I guess I'll just walk to work.

Buying groceries oh Lord I'm suprised we haven't starved to death in the 
canned goods aisle trying to decide what type of tomato sauce to buy, 
roasted garlic, low salt, herb and butter ...


I can't speak for Urban areas as I don't live in one or serve one, but 
in BFE where we have 3 ISPs.  I know several people that don't have 
internet, don't have a computer and don't want one (don't know how they 
function, just saying I see it regularly).  I also know several people 
that only have dialup, and know that they pay $20/mo for dialup when 
they can get my bottom end wireless for $25/mo and not tie up their 
phone line.  They are not interested, they use it to send the occasional 
email and that is it.  I've tried marketing to them, I've laid it out, 
but they persist in not spending the extra $5 dollars.  I doubt they 
would spend an extra $2.


I have a $30 plan for 390K and a $40 plan for 2M, more than 80% of my 
customers are on the $30 plan because it meets their needs.  It doesn't 
matter to them that for only $10 more a month they can get 5 times the 
speed.



Mark Koskenmaki wrote:

I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY

Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...



+++
neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East Washington
email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net


  

The main problem seems to be the free-market telecom frenzy that has
enveloped the US (and much of its population) in technology and price
uncertainty. With no national broadband policy in place, multiple
service providers are targeting affluent urban areas, while leaving many
poor and rural dwellers to fend for themselves. In big cities, that
means consumers face daunting broadband choices. Should they sign a
contract with their cable provider or telco? Wait for the installation
of a Wi-Fi network? Choose an alternate provider like EarthLink? And
which broadband technology is the best? Many just stick with what they
know best: the slow but reliable telephone.




  


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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Anthony Will
I have a $30 plan for 390K and a $40 plan for 2M, more than 80% of my 
customers are on the $30 plan because it meets their needs.  It doesn't 
matter to them that for only $10 more a month they can get 5 times the 
speed.


Actually you did that to your self.  Your 80% is dead on.  You see you 
have a basic plan, a value plan and a advanced plan.  Generally speaking 
you will have 80% of a subscriber base utilize your middle plan.  That 
is just how it works and why so many organizations offer the 3 tiered 
service.  If you wanted your customers on a say $50 plan.  You would 
create the $30 basic plan the $50 value plan and the keep up with the 
jones $75 plan.  Almost 9 times out of 10 they will go for the middle 
package if they have decided to purchase your solution.  This works if 
your selling ice cream or Internet it is a basic rule of marketing.


Anthony Will
Broadband Corp.

Sam Tetherow wrote:
Wow, if they really believe that, I wonder how they expect the 
American public to buy a car?  Gee, Ford, Chevy, GMC, KIA, Toyota, 
Subaru ...

Econo, Sedan, Van, SUV, Pickup ...
Sheesh, I guess I'll just walk to work.

Buying groceries oh Lord I'm suprised we haven't starved to death in 
the canned goods aisle trying to decide what type of tomato sauce to 
buy, roasted garlic, low salt, herb and butter ...


I can't speak for Urban areas as I don't live in one or serve one, but 
in BFE where we have 3 ISPs.  I know several people that don't have 
internet, don't have a computer and don't want one (don't know how 
they function, just saying I see it regularly).  I also know several 
people that only have dialup, and know that they pay $20/mo for dialup 
when they can get my bottom end wireless for $25/mo and not tie up 
their phone line.  They are not interested, they use it to send the 
occasional email and that is it.  I've tried marketing to them, I've 
laid it out, but they persist in not spending the extra $5 dollars.  I 
doubt they would spend an extra $2.


I have a $30 plan for 390K and a $40 plan for 2M, more than 80% of my 
customers are on the $30 plan because it meets their needs.  It 
doesn't matter to them that for only $10 more a month they can get 5 
times the speed.



Mark Koskenmaki wrote:

I can't believe that someone would be dumb enough to write this...  The
biggest problem is a lack of FEDERAL POLICY

Oh, please.   Spare us the insane idiocy...



+++
neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East 
Washington

email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net


 

The main problem seems to be the free-market telecom frenzy that has
enveloped the US (and much of its population) in technology and price
uncertainty. With no national broadband policy in place, multiple
service providers are targeting affluent urban areas, while leaving 
many

poor and rural dwellers to fend for themselves. In big cities, that
means consumers face daunting broadband choices. Should they sign a
contract with their cable provider or telco? Wait for the installation
of a Wi-Fi network? Choose an alternate provider like EarthLink? And
which broadband technology is the best? Many just stick with what they
know best: the slow but reliable telephone.




  



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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition

2006-09-20 Thread Peter R.

Tom DeReggi wrote:


Peter,

 Other figures from research firms like Forrester
show that only about 40% of Americans have high-speed connections at
home, 30% rely on dial-up and 25% don’t have any Internet connections at
all!

I do not disagree with those statistics. I disagree with your 
statement that most DialUp users are DialUp users by choice, and that 
most people that don't have Internet are doing so by choice.


I think you are inferring there, but I know several people who keep 
dial-up (mostly with AOL) because of the pain of change, including my 
sister, who could get SBC DSL by Yahoo for less than her AOL account.  
So yeah many are on it on purpose.  A buddy keeps dial-up at home so his 
kids will not get addicted and be on MySpace all night. Again on purpose 
he has dial-up.


The facts are, 60% of America is under served, which is both 
embaressing for the US, and a call for opportunity.  In todays world, 
there is justification for every home in America to have broadband and 
to have a computer.  Not having a computer, is no longer a valid 
arguement. Even the most impoverished homes, can manage to budget to 
buy a $300 computer from BestBuy, that includes monitor and printer.  


Yeah. People on welfare buy PC's. They buy Xbox. It's a status and 
social thing. But I won't write a thesis on it. Again this is from 
personal experience.


Or for that matter to get a FREE used donated computer.  A pentium pc, 
does Broadband fine (although slow and problematic).  The reason 
people do not buy broadband, is NOT price. It doesn't need to be 
cheaper. There is already cost justification, the end user just 
doesn't always realize it at first.  Understanding that the Average 
DialUp user is paying $35 a month already (line and service).  The 
problem is that broadband is to cheap.  So large players can't justify 
expansion into lower profit centers, by subsidees of higher paying 
subs.  The problem is that users DO NOT HAVE OPTIONS.  USERS HAVE NOT 
BEEN SOLICITED WITH PROPER SALES AND MARKETING TO CONVINCE THEM THEY 
NEED IT, BECAUE IT IS POINTLESS WHEN IT IS NOT AVAILABLE.


I think the duopoly is doing a great job of marketing and lowering the 
ARPU to get everyone on the internet.
But I am still amazed when I ask people for an email - and they don't 
have one!


- Peter
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[WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among Industrialized Nations

2006-09-18 Thread Dawn DiPietro

U.S. Still Lags In Broadband Access
Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among Industrialized Nations
By Martin H. Bosworth
ConsumerAffairs.Com

September 17, 2006

The constant refrain of major telecommunications and cable companies is 
that there's heavy competition for the Internet user's dollar.


But heavy competition doesn't mean being able to choose only between 
Comcast and Verizon, and a newly published report reminds us that the 
United States still lags far behind the rest of the world in providing 
affordable broadband to its citizens.


Broadband Reality Check II, an update to a report published last year 
by Consumers Union, the Consumer Federation of America, and media policy 
group Free Press, found that the United States continues to promote 
duopolies between major telecom and cable providers as real competition, 
that the level of Americans' access to the Internet can be severely 
restricted by income level and geographic area, and that the FCC uses 
misleading statistics to claim that competition is healthy for consumers.


America appears to be a land of broadband haves and have-nots, where 
rural and low-income citizens are left behind in the information 
economy, the report stated. This situation is the result of failed 
policy and a lack of imagination and vision from our policymakers.


Among the report's findings:

• The United States continues to rank 16th among industrialized nations 
for broadband development and penetration. Not only that, but broadband 
customers in countries such as Japan and South Korea enjoy broadband 
speeds that are hundreds of times faster, and can enjoy bundled 
television, phone, and Internet services for $25-$35 dollars, roughly 
the same price as a standalone U.S. broadband connection.


• The U.S. broadband market is essentially a series of regional 
duopolies, with the top four cable and telephone companies -- Comcast, 
Verizon, ATT, and Time Warner -- controlling over 83 percent of the 
entire broadband market, while buyouts and mergers of companies like 
ATT and BellSouth serve to reduce actual competitive markets even more.


• The FCC continues to use ZIP codes that register one broadband 
provider as proof that broadband penetration is comprehensive across the 
U.S. But a recent report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
found that the ZIP code method didn't account for the lack of more than 
one provider in any given region.


• The GAO also found that rural households and families with incomes of 
less than $30,000 were four times less likely to have broadband Internet 
access than urban households or those with incomes $75,000 and higher. A 
full third of American households are still stuck with dial-up as their 
only choice for Internet access.


The report comes at a time when telecommunications issues are very much 
on the minds of lawmakers. The massive update to the Telecommunications 
Act of 1996 had many provisions to address broadband access, most of 
which favored the duopoly system, and seemed ready to pass both the 
House and Senate.


But consumer groups and technology companies were angered over the lack 
of protection for net neutrality, the right of any Internet user or 
content provider to access the Interent on an equal footing with others. 
They launched a massive grassroots campaign that drew media attention to 
the cozy state of affairs for the telcos and cable companies


Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), author of the Senate's version of the 
telecom bill, recently acknowledged that the bill was all but dead and 
would have to be partitioned into individual bills to have any chance of 
passing.


One portion of both the House and Senate bills addresses the concept of 
publicly-funded municipal wireless networks, or Municipal Wi-Fi for 
short. Although many cities and towns are developing their own wireless 
systems for free or low-cost use, heavy telecom lobbying has pushed 15 
states to ban any sort of initiatives for Wi-Fi.


Telecom companies such as ATT are determined to roll-out high-speed 
broadband networks and provide platforms for TV over Internet services 
such as MobiTV. The company favors tiered pricing models that will 
enable only the richest clients to pay for the best service.


Critics fear that without truly affordable broadband and equal access to 
content, the digital divide between rich and poor will continue to 
grow, and the middle-class users will be stuck in the slow lane of 
Internet access.


As the authors of the Broadband Reality Check put it, Faith-based 
policy and wishful thinking will not bring broadband to rural areas, and 
the repeated use of misleading data will not help low-income consumers 
afford broadband.


http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/09/cfa_broadband.html
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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among IndustrializedNations

2006-09-18 Thread Mark Koskenmaki
I get more and more frustrated with these kinds of titles...

You'd think there wasn't broadband available.   There's broadband available
in an amazingly wide area...  But you can't force consumers to buy it.

This is probably just the first volley of a campaign to gin up a few hundred
billion to give to the telcos as subsidy to lower the price of
broadband...

We should be very wary of this kind of misleading stuff, it's going to bite
us big time if we don't speak up and get some real perspective seen.


+++
neofast.net - fast internet for North East Oregon and South East Washington
email me at mark at neofast dot net
541-969-8200
Direct commercial inquiries to purchasing at neofast dot net

- Original Message - 
From: Dawn DiPietro [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 3:27 AM
Subject: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among
IndustrializedNations


 U.S. Still Lags In Broadband Access
 Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among Industrialized Nations
 By Martin H. Bosworth
 ConsumerAffairs.Com

 September 17, 2006

 The constant refrain of major telecommunications and cable companies is
 that there's heavy competition for the Internet user's dollar.



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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among IndustrializedNations

2006-09-18 Thread Peter R.
We are actually at the point where about 68% of the US population has 
Internet.

The rest don't own a computer or do not want Internet.

Some of that 68% is still on dial-up. For some it is a price thing. For 
some it is not understanding technology. For some it is to make the 
experience painful to avoid wasting hours on the internet.


So dropping the price - as SBC and VZ have experienced - to sub-$15 gets 
you some dial-up conversions. But when the price returns to normal, some 
switch back to cheaper dial-up.


The dilemma becomes How do you get more internet appliance (PC's, 
laptops, PDAs, internet terminal) penetration?


The marketing question is: What Remarkable  Useful things can you do 
with broadband (other than entertainment)?


That's my 2 cents.

Peter @ RAD-INFO, Inc.

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Re: [WISPA] Lack of Competition Leaves U.S. 16th Among IndustrializedNations

2006-09-18 Thread George Rogato

Peter R. wrote:
We are actually at the point where about 68% of the US population has 
Internet.

The rest don't own a computer or do not want Internet.

Some of that 68% is still on dial-up. For some it is a price thing. For 
some it is not understanding technology. For some it is to make the 
experience painful to avoid wasting hours on the internet.


So dropping the price - as SBC and VZ have experienced - to sub-$15 gets 
you some dial-up conversions. But when the price returns to normal, some 
switch back to cheaper dial-up.


The dilemma becomes How do you get more internet appliance (PC's, 
laptops, PDAs, internet terminal) penetration?


The marketing question is: What Remarkable  Useful things can you do 
with broadband (other than entertainment)?


That's my 2 cents.

Peter @ RAD-INFO, Inc.



I agree with you, I still have a considerable amount of dial up subscribers.

There needs to be a motivator, other than price, that makes these types 
of users decide to trade up. They have to want to.


And I thought giant pictures killing  their email would have done the 
trick by now :(


George

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