Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-20 Thread Butch Evans
On Wed, 17 Aug 2005, Brian Rohrbacher wrote:

I would think the seat strap takes pressure off the leg straps.
I'm thinking the leg straps is what cuts off the circulation.  Is
this thinking correct?

It is not that the circulation is cut off.  Veins (the blood vessels
that move blood back to the heart) do not have the ability to move
blood without the muscles around them moving.  The veins in your
body have valves every so often that assist in moving the blood back
to the heart.  The problem described in the article is not a result
of blood flow being cut off.  Rather, the problem described is one
where the muscles in your legs are inactive, and therefore, do not
force the blood back up to the heart.  This results in a lowered
volume of blood for available for the heart to pump.  In this
situation, your heart will automatically reduce the flow of blood
by slowing down.  As stated in the article, usually, this reduction
in blood flow will result in the victim fainting, which, for someone
on the ground, is a good thing, because a victim that is prone
(horizontal), gravity can get the blood (at least some of it) back
into the system, and the blood volume will increase.  HOWEVER, since
the vicitim is strapped into an upright position on a tower, this
does not occur, and gravity keeps the blood in the legs.

The thing to learn, for a tower climber, is that it is not a good
idea to let your legs rest by hanging from your positioning gear
with your legs completely inactive for extended periods.  By
extended here, I mean 2-4 minutes.  When I climb, I will sometimes
relax by allowing my legs to dangle below me for a few seconds.
For me, this is not a very comfortable position, but it is nice to
remove the pressure on my feet for a few seconds.

I find this article especially interesting, because when I was in
college, I was a pre-med student, and my love was circulatory
system studies.  :-)

-- 
Butch Evans
BPS Networks  http://www.bpsnetworks.com/
Bernie, MO
Mikrotik Certified Consultant
(http://www.mikrotik.com/consultants.html)

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RE: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-20 Thread G.Villarini
When I sleep, my legs are relaxed too...jeje

Gino A. Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Butch Evans
Sent: Saturday, August 20, 2005 10:27 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

On Wed, 17 Aug 2005, Brian Rohrbacher wrote:

I would think the seat strap takes pressure off the leg straps.
I'm thinking the leg straps is what cuts off the circulation.  Is
this thinking correct?

It is not that the circulation is cut off.  Veins (the blood vessels
that move blood back to the heart) do not have the ability to move
blood without the muscles around them moving.  The veins in your
body have valves every so often that assist in moving the blood back
to the heart.  The problem described in the article is not a result
of blood flow being cut off.  Rather, the problem described is one
where the muscles in your legs are inactive, and therefore, do not
force the blood back up to the heart.  This results in a lowered
volume of blood for available for the heart to pump.  In this
situation, your heart will automatically reduce the flow of blood
by slowing down.  As stated in the article, usually, this reduction
in blood flow will result in the victim fainting, which, for someone
on the ground, is a good thing, because a victim that is prone
(horizontal), gravity can get the blood (at least some of it) back
into the system, and the blood volume will increase.  HOWEVER, since
the vicitim is strapped into an upright position on a tower, this
does not occur, and gravity keeps the blood in the legs.

The thing to learn, for a tower climber, is that it is not a good
idea to let your legs rest by hanging from your positioning gear
with your legs completely inactive for extended periods.  By
extended here, I mean 2-4 minutes.  When I climb, I will sometimes
relax by allowing my legs to dangle below me for a few seconds.
For me, this is not a very comfortable position, but it is nice to
remove the pressure on my feet for a few seconds.

I find this article especially interesting, because when I was in
college, I was a pre-med student, and my love was circulatory
system studies.  :-)

-- 
Butch Evans
BPS Networks  http://www.bpsnetworks.com/
Bernie, MO
Mikrotik Certified Consultant
(http://www.mikrotik.com/consultants.html)

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RE: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-20 Thread Butch Evans
On Sat, 20 Aug 2005, G.Villarini wrote:

When I sleep, my legs are relaxed too...jeje

So are mine...I just don't sleep with my legs dangling below me. ;-)

-- 
Butch Evans
BPS Networks  http://www.bpsnetworks.com/
Bernie, MO
Mikrotik Certified Consultant
(http://www.mikrotik.com/consultants.html)

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Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Tom DeReggi



What are some of the alternativegood training 
programs other than Comtrain?

My advice as a novice,is...

Don't underestimate the strength it takes to climb 
to higher heights. Once you realize that its to far for your physique its to 
late, you still have the hardest part left, going back down again! The 
last thing you want to be doing is hyperventilating at the top of a 
tower.Don't be afraid to tie-of and sit down on the harness seat, and 
regain your wind / strength. When you climb tired, its easy to get sloppy and 
under estimate where you are grabbing.

Start out withshorter height 
excersizesto get familiar with the process and problems you will 
encounter. Simple problems get complicated, when you need at least one of 
the two handsto hold on.Issues such as where do you put the screws 
so you don't drop them, and can find them again when they need to get screwed 
back again. How do you keep your bucket from catching on things. 
What length do you need your tie-off lanyards adjusted to, to be 
comfortable. How do you hold the antenna, and screw it on at the same 
time, and hold on?You learn to use your tie offs optimally, and your 
legs. Most importantly DON"T go climbing alone! Have the ground people do 
as much work as possible, to save the climber's strength.


Tom DeReggiRapidDSL  Wireless, Inc

IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband

  - Original Message - 
  From: 
  Brian 
  Rohrbacher 
  To: WISPA General List 
  Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 12:23 
  PM
  Subject: [WISPA] The climb safe 
  thread
  Maybe I can't afford training, or maybe I don't want to 
  allocate the funds for training. Either way, there are more people out 
  there just like me.Since I was recently informed about my lack of common 
  sense climbing, I figured a thread needs to be started. Everyone 
  please post any pointers you you can think of that would benefit someone who 
  lacks common sense. Anything from jumping into the back of a truck, 
  ladder climbing, roof walking, tower monkey tips, procedure, gear, weather, 
  what to haul up strapped to your back, pulleys to use, rope, ect.. I'm 
  just an accident waiting to happen. =-O 
  Everyone reading this understands that the opinions 
  about to be given are just that and you should get "real" training before 
  attempting any climbing. :-P  http://www.comtrainusa.com/CoursesAvailable.htmG.Villarini 
  wrote: 
  Ohhh ok, jeje!

Gino A. Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] On
Behalf Of George
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:58 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance tosave
mylife)

Brian is 21.
Kurt is in high school.

Guess I mushed them together :)

George


G.Villarini wrote:
  
21 and high school? George, you flunked kindergarten 3 times ? :-)

Gino A. Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband Corp.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] On
Behalf Of George
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:22 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance to save
mylife)

Brian :)
Your only 21 years old, CONGRATS!

When I read about guys like you and Kurt , who is still in high school 
and running a wisp, it makes me happy and proud of you guys that are 
starting life embracing a business and making a go at it.

So keep up the hard work, someday you'll look back on this era of your 
life and understand why your a success at what ever you will be doing
then.
  
I strongly believe in young people  getting involved and participating 
in the business world.

It's a sign of independence and ingenuity, which is what drives the 
American way.

Congrats again!

George

Brian Rohrbacher wrote:


  Sure is nice to ask for advice and be insulted.  If you know so much 
about how I climb, tell me what I have done wrong.  Or start asking me 
trick questions that I'll answer wrong.  Than you may insult me.

  
  
  
  

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  wireless@wispa.orgSubscribe/Unsubscribe:http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wirelessArchives: 
  http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/
  
  

  No virus found in this incoming message.Checked by AVG 
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  8/17/2005
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Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Lonnie Nunweiler
Not sure if you want to modify your advice of tie-of and sit down on
the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength after you read the
following link.  It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not
aware of the dangers in doing so.

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm

Lonnie

On 8/17/05, Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 What are some of the alternative good training programs other than Comtrain?
  
 My advice as a novice, is...
  
 Don't underestimate the strength it takes to climb to higher heights. Once
 you realize that its to far for your physique its to late, you still have
 the hardest part left, going back down again!  The last thing you want to be
 doing is hyperventilating at the top of a tower. Don't be afraid to tie-of
 and sit down on the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength. When you
 climb tired, its easy to get sloppy and under estimate where you are
 grabbing.
  
  Start out with shorter height excersizes to get familiar with the process
 and problems you will encounter.  Simple problems get complicated, when you
 need at least one of the two hands to hold on. Issues such as where do you
 put the screws so you don't drop them, and can find them again when they
 need to get screwed back again.  How do you keep your bucket from catching
 on things.  What length do you need your tie-off lanyards adjusted to, to be
 comfortable.  How do you hold the antenna, and screw it on at the same time,
 and hold on?  You learn to use your tie offs optimally, and your legs.  Most
 importantly DONT go climbing alone! Have the ground people do as much work
 as possible, to save the climber's strength.
  
  
 Tom DeReggi
 RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
  
 IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Brian Rohrbacher 
 To: WISPA General List 
 Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 12:23 PM
 Subject: [WISPA] The climb safe thread
 
 Maybe I can't afford training, or maybe I don't want to allocate the funds
 for training.  Either way, there are more people out there just like me.
 Since I was recently informed about my lack of common sense climbing, I
 figured a thread needs to be started.  
 Everyone please post any pointers you you can think of that would benefit
 someone who lacks common sense.  
 Anything from jumping into the back of a truck, ladder climbing, roof
 walking, tower monkey tips, procedure, gear, weather, what to haul up
 strapped to your back, pulleys to use, rope, ect.. 
 I'm just an accident waiting to happen.  =-O 
 
 Everyone reading this understands that the opinions about to be given are
 just that and you should get real training before attempting any climbing.
  :-P   http://www.comtrainusa.com/CoursesAvailable.htm
   
 G.Villarini wrote: 
 Ohhh ok, jeje!

Gino A. Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband
 Corp.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original
 Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of
 George
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:58 AM
To: WISPA General
 List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance
 tosave
mylife)

Brian is 21.
Kurt is in high school.

Guess I mushed them
 together :)

George


G.Villarini wrote:

 21 and high school? George, you flunked kindergarten 3 times ? :-)

Gino A.
 Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband
 Corp.
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original
 Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of
 George
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:22 AM
To: WISPA General
 List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance to
 save
mylife)

Brian :)
Your only 21 years old, CONGRATS!

When I read about
 guys like you and Kurt , who is still in high school 
and running a wisp, it
 makes me happy and proud of you guys that are 
starting life embracing a
 business and making a go at it.

So keep up the hard work, someday you'll
 look back on this era of your 
life and understand why your a success at
 what ever you will be doing

 then.

 I strongly believe in young people getting involved and participating 
in
 the business world.

It's a sign of independence and ingenuity, which is
 what drives the 
American way.

Congrats again!

George

Brian Rohrbacher
 wrote:


 Sure is nice to ask for advice and be insulted. If you know so much 
about
 how I climb, tell me what I have done wrong. Or start asking me 
trick
 questions that I'll answer wrong. Than you may insult me.


  
 
 
 
 
 
 -- 
 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org
 
 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless
 
 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/
 
 
 
 
 
 No virus found in this incoming message.
 Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
 Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.10.11/74 - Release Date: 8/17/2005
 
 
 
 
 
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Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Tom DeReggi

Lonnie,

Interesting Arcticle.

First, I want to correct a previous statement. What I wrote was not what I 
meant.  When I was suggesting using the seat, I didn't mean actually sit 
down, what I meant was use the seat. I use the lanyard to attach at the seat 
side D-Rings, and lean back so my legs and straps share the weight instead 
of my arms.  In this possition it is easy to rest and regain strength.


What I didn't know, and found interesting in the arcticle posted was:

Third, the harness keeps the worker in an upright position, regardless of 
loss of consciousness, which is what kills workers.


I never knew that. I was under the impression that if the head got cocked 
back or cocked down, that it would restrict airflow, or if person got 
inverted, blood rrush to their head and die, therefore upright was best.


But after reading that, It sounds like to me that if you go unconcious, you 
are screwed any way you rest, and really the only positive option to save a 
person is shortening the time to complete the rescue.  Any advice on the 
preferred way to hang if you are unconcious?


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc

IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband

- Original Message - 
From: Lonnie Nunweiler [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread


Not sure if you want to modify your advice of tie-of and sit down on
the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength after you read the
following link.  It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not
aware of the dangers in doing so.

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm

Lonnie

On 8/17/05, Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
What are some of the alternative good training programs other than 
Comtrain?


My advice as a novice, is...

Don't underestimate the strength it takes to climb to higher heights. Once
you realize that its to far for your physique its to late, you still have
the hardest part left, going back down again!  The last thing you want to 
be

doing is hyperventilating at the top of a tower. Don't be afraid to tie-of
and sit down on the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength. When 
you

climb tired, its easy to get sloppy and under estimate where you are
grabbing.

 Start out with shorter height excersizes to get familiar with the process
and problems you will encounter.  Simple problems get complicated, when 
you

need at least one of the two hands to hold on. Issues such as where do you
put the screws so you don't drop them, and can find them again when they
need to get screwed back again.  How do you keep your bucket from catching
on things.  What length do you need your tie-off lanyards adjusted to, to 
be
comfortable.  How do you hold the antenna, and screw it on at the same 
time,
and hold on?  You learn to use your tie offs optimally, and your legs. 
Most
importantly DONT go climbing alone! Have the ground people do as much 
work

as possible, to save the climber's strength.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc

IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband

- Original Message - 
From: Brian Rohrbacher

To: WISPA General List
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 12:23 PM
Subject: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

Maybe I can't afford training, or maybe I don't want to allocate the funds
for training.  Either way, there are more people out there just like me.
Since I was recently informed about my lack of common sense climbing, I
figured a thread needs to be started.
Everyone please post any pointers you you can think of that would benefit
someone who lacks common sense.
Anything from jumping into the back of a truck, ladder climbing, roof
walking, tower monkey tips, procedure, gear, weather, what to haul up
strapped to your back, pulleys to use, rope, ect..
I'm just an accident waiting to happen.  =-O

Everyone reading this understands that the opinions about to be given are
just that and you should get real training before attempting any 
climbing.

 :-P   http://www.comtrainusa.com/CoursesAvailable.htm

G.Villarini wrote:
Ohhh ok, jeje!


Gino A. Villarini,
Aeronet Wireless Broadband

Corp.

[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original

Message-

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On

Behalf Of

George

Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:58 AM
To: WISPA General

List

Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance

tosave

mylife)

Brian is 21.
Kurt is in high school.

Guess I mushed them

together :)


George


G.Villarini wrote:


21 and high school? George, you flunked kindergarten 3 times ? :-)


Gino A.

Villarini,

Aeronet Wireless Broadband

Corp.

[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original

Message-

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On

Behalf Of

George

Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:22 AM
To: WISPA General

List

Subject: Re: [WISPA

Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Brian Rohrbacher




http://www.comtrainusa.com/Tower%20Tech/ttech.htm
While we're on the topic, wouldn't it be best to take this class too?
If your climbing towers, you should know how to build one. That is the
only way you might determine if one is safe to climb.

Lonnie Nunweiler wrote:

  Not sure if you want to modify your advice of "tie-of and sit down on
the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength" after you read the
following link.  It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not
aware of the dangers in doing so.

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm

Lonnie

On 8/17/05, Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  
  
What are some of the alternative good training programs other than Comtrain?
 
My advice as a novice, is...
 
Don't underestimate the strength it takes to climb to higher heights. Once
you realize that its to far for your physique its to late, you still have
the hardest part left, going back down again!  The last thing you want to be
doing is hyperventilating at the top of a tower. Don't be afraid to tie-of
and sit down on the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength. When you
climb tired, its easy to get sloppy and under estimate where you are
grabbing.
 
 Start out with shorter height excersizes to get familiar with the process
and problems you will encounter.  Simple problems get complicated, when you
need at least one of the two hands to hold on. Issues such as where do you
put the screws so you don't drop them, and can find them again when they
need to get screwed back again.  How do you keep your bucket from catching
on things.  What length do you need your tie-off lanyards adjusted to, to be
comfortable.  How do you hold the antenna, and screw it on at the same time,
and hold on?  You learn to use your tie offs optimally, and your legs.  Most
importantly DON"T go climbing alone! Have the ground people do as much work
as possible, to save the climber's strength.
 
 
Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
 
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband

- Original Message - 
From: Brian Rohrbacher 
To: WISPA General List 
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 12:23 PM
Subject: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

Maybe I can't afford training, or maybe I don't want to allocate the funds
for training.  Either way, there are more people out there just like me.
Since I was recently informed about my lack of common sense climbing, I
figured a thread needs to be started.  
Everyone please post any pointers you you can think of that would benefit
someone who lacks common sense.  
Anything from jumping into the back of a truck, ladder climbing, roof
walking, tower monkey tips, procedure, gear, weather, what to haul up
strapped to your back, pulleys to use, rope, ect.. 
I'm just an accident waiting to happen.  =-O 

Everyone reading this understands that the opinions about to be given are
just that and you should get "real" training before attempting any climbing.
 :-P   http://www.comtrainusa.com/CoursesAvailable.htm
  
G.Villarini wrote: 
Ohhh ok, jeje!

  
  
Gino A. Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband
  
  
Corp.

  
  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original
  
  
Message-

  
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  
  
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] On

  
  Behalf Of
  
  
George

  
  Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:58 AM
To: WISPA General
  
  
List

  
  Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance
  
  
tosave

  
  mylife)

Brian is 21.
Kurt is in high school.

Guess I mushed them
  
  
together :)

  
  
George


G.Villarini wrote:

  
  
21 and high school? George, you flunked kindergarten 3 times ? :-)

  
  
Gino A.
  
  
Villarini, 

  
  Aeronet Wireless Broadband
  
  
Corp.

  
  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original
  
  
Message-

  
  From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  
  
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] On

  
  Behalf Of
  
  
George

  
  Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:22 AM
To: WISPA General
  
  
List

  
  Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance to
  
  
save

  
  mylife)

Brian :)
Your only 21 years old, CONGRATS!

When I read about
  
  
guys like you and Kurt , who is still in high school 

  
  and running a wisp, it
  
  
makes me happy and proud of you guys that are 

  
  starting life embracing a
  
  
business and making a go at it.

  
  
So keep up the hard work, someday you'll
  
  
look back on this era of your 

  
  life and understand why your a success at
  
  
what ever you will be doing

  
  
  
  
then.

  
  
  
  
I strongly believe in young people getting involved and participating 

  
  in
  
  
the business world.

  
  
It's a sign of independence and ingenuity, which is
  
  
what drives the 

  
  

Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Lonnie Nunweiler
I agree.  If you have ever seen one come down you know that it should
be built correctly, and not by some guy who is cheap and dirty.  A
poorly constructed or installed tower can do much property damage and
can even kill.

I think common sense is great, but professional sense with respect to
technical or trade things is better.

If you do not wish to take a complete safety course why not approach
your local fire dept and see if they would give some pointers at
least.  Join a rock climbing club and really get into it.  The same
issues are there when you are hanging on to a rock face and a slip or
fall means certain death.

Lonnie

On 8/17/05, Brian Rohrbacher [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 http://www.comtrainusa.com/Tower%20Tech/ttech.htm
 While we're on the topic, wouldn't it be best to take this class too?  If
 your climbing towers, you should know how to build one.  That is the only
 way you might determine if one is safe to climb.
 
 
 Lonnie Nunweiler wrote: 
 Not sure if you want to modify your advice of tie-of and sit down on
the
 harness seat, and regain your wind / strength after you read the
following
 link. It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not
aware of the dangers
 in doing
 so.

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm

Lonnie

On
 8/17/05, Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 What are some of the alternative good training programs other than
 Comtrain?

My advice as a novice, is...

Don't underestimate the strength
 it takes to climb to higher heights. Once
you realize that its to far for
 your physique its to late, you still have
the hardest part left, going back
 down again! The last thing you want to be
doing is hyperventilating at the
 top of a tower. Don't be afraid to tie-of
and sit down on the harness seat,
 and regain your wind / strength. When you
climb tired, its easy to get
 sloppy and under estimate where you are
grabbing.

Start out with shorter
 height excersizes to get familiar with the process
and problems you will
 encounter. Simple problems get complicated, when you
need at least one of
 the two hands to hold on. Issues such as where do you
put the screws so you
 don't drop them, and can find them again when they
need to get screwed back
 again. How do you keep your bucket from catching
on things. What length do
 you need your tie-off lanyards adjusted to, to be
comfortable. How do you
 hold the antenna, and screw it on at the same time,
and hold on? You learn
 to use your tie offs optimally, and your legs. Most
importantly DONT go
 climbing alone! Have the ground people do as much work
as possible, to save
 the climber's strength.


Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
 
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband

- Original Message - 
From:
 Brian Rohrbacher 
To: WISPA General List 
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005
 12:23 PM
Subject: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

Maybe I can't afford
 training, or maybe I don't want to allocate the funds
for training. Either
 way, there are more people out there just like me.
Since I was recently
 informed about my lack of common sense climbing, I
figured a thread needs to
 be started. 
Everyone please post any pointers you you can think of that
 would benefit
someone who lacks common sense. 
Anything from jumping into
 the back of a truck, ladder climbing, roof
walking, tower monkey tips,
 procedure, gear, weather, what to haul up
strapped to your back, pulleys to
 use, rope, ect.. 
I'm just an accident waiting to happen. =-O 

Everyone
 reading this understands that the opinions about to be given are
just that
 and you should get real training before attempting any climbing.
:-P
 http://www.comtrainusa.com/CoursesAvailable.htm
 
G.Villarini wrote: 
Ohhh ok, jeje!

 Gino A. Villarini, 
Aeronet Wireless Broadband

 Corp.

 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original

 Message-

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On

 Behalf Of

 George

 Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:58 AM
To: WISPA General

 List

 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance

 tosave

 mylife)

Brian is 21.
Kurt is in high school.

Guess I mushed them

 together :)

 George


G.Villarini wrote:


 21 and high school? George, you flunked kindergarten 3 times ? :-)

 Gino A.

 Villarini, 

 Aeronet Wireless Broadband

 Corp.

 [EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original

 Message-

 From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On

 Behalf Of

 George

 Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:22 AM
To: WISPA General

 List

 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Lanyard and positioning straps (last chance to

 save

 mylife)

Brian :)
Your only 21 years old, CONGRATS!

When I read about

 guys like you and Kurt , who is still in high school 

 and running a wisp, it

 makes me happy and proud of you guys that are 

 starting life embracing a

 business and making a go at it.

 So keep up the hard work, someday you'll

 

Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Brian Rohrbacher




Now rock climbing, that sounds fun. I wonder how far $600 would go in
a rock climbing club.

Lonnie Nunweiler wrote:

  I agree.  If you have ever seen one come down you know that it should
be built correctly, and not by some guy who is cheap and dirty.  A
poorly constructed or installed tower can do much property damage and
can even kill.

I think common sense is great, but professional sense with respect to
technical or trade things is better.

If you do not wish to take a complete safety course why not approach
your local fire dept and see if they would give some pointers at
least.  Join a rock climbing club and really get into it.  The same
issues are there when you are hanging on to a rock face and a slip or
fall means certain death.

Lonnie

On 8/17/05, Brian Rohrbacher [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  
  
http://www.comtrainusa.com/Tower%20Tech/ttech.htm
While we're on the topic, wouldn't it be best to take this class too?  If
your climbing towers, you should know how to build one.  That is the only
way you might determine if one is safe to climb.


Lonnie Nunweiler wrote: 
Not sure if you want to modify your advice of "tie-of and sit down on

  
  the
  
  
harness seat, and regain your wind / strength" after you read the

  
  following
  
  
link. It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not

  
  aware of the dangers
  
  
in doing
so.

  
  
http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm

Lonnie

On
  
  
8/17/05, Tom DeReggi [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

  
  
  
  
What are some of the alternative good training programs other than
Comtrain?

  
  
My advice as a novice, is...

Don't underestimate the strength
  
  
it takes to climb to higher heights. Once

  
  you realize that its to far for
  
  
your physique its to late, you still have

  
  the hardest part left, going back
  
  
down again! The last thing you want to be

  
  doing is hyperventilating at the
  
  
top of a tower. Don't be afraid to tie-of

  
  and sit down on the harness seat,
  
  
and regain your wind / strength. When you

  
  climb tired, its easy to get
  
  
sloppy and under estimate where you are

  
  grabbing.

Start out with shorter
  
  
height excersizes to get familiar with the process

  
  and problems you will
  
  
encounter. Simple problems get complicated, when you

  
  need at least one of
  
  
the two hands to hold on. Issues such as where do you

  
  put the screws so you
  
  
don't drop them, and can find them again when they

  
  need to get screwed back
  
  
again. How do you keep your bucket from catching

  
  on things. What length do
  
  
you need your tie-off lanyards adjusted to, to be

  
  comfortable. How do you
  
  
hold the antenna, and screw it on at the same time,

  
  and hold on? You learn
  
  
to use your tie offs optimally, and your legs. Most

  
  importantly DON"T go
  
  
climbing alone! Have the ground people do as much work

  
  as possible, to save
  
  
the climber's strength.

  
  

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL  Wireless, Inc
  
  IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband

- Original Message - 
From:
  
  
Brian Rohrbacher 

  
  To: WISPA General List 
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005
  
  
12:23 PM

  
  Subject: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

Maybe I can't afford
  
  
training, or maybe I don't want to allocate the funds

  
  for training. Either
  
  
way, there are more people out there just like me.

  
  Since I was recently
  
  
informed about my lack of common sense climbing, I

  
  figured a thread needs to
  
  
be started. 

  
  Everyone please post any pointers you you can think of that
  
  
would benefit

  
  someone who lacks common sense. 
Anything from jumping into
  
  
the back of a truck, ladder climbing, roof

  
  walking, tower monkey tips,
  
  
procedure, gear, weather, what to haul up

  
  strapped to your back, pulleys to
  
  
use, rope, ect.. 

  
  I'm just an accident waiting to happen. =-O 

Everyone
  
  
reading this understands that the opinions about to be given are

  
  just that
  
  
and you should get "real" training before attempting any climbing.

  
  :-P
  
  
http://www.comtrainusa.com/CoursesAvailable.htm


  
  G.Villarini wrote: 
Ohhh ok, jeje!

  
  
Gino A. Villarini, 

  
  Aeronet Wireless Broadband

  
  
Corp.

  
  
  
  
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

  
  www.aeronetpr.com
787.767.7466

-Original

  
  
Message-

  
  
  
  
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

  
  
  
  
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] On

  
  
  
  
Behalf Of

  
  
  
  
George

  
  
  
  
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:58 AM

  
  To: 

Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread George

Lonnie Nunweiler wrote:

Not sure if you want to modify your advice of tie-of and sit down on
the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength after you read the
following link.  It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not
aware of the dangers in doing so.

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm

Lonnie




I had my guy read this link.

One thing to note, is that the harness with the seat, is not really a 
seat that you sit in and dangle your feet.

It just adds added comfort.

I think that was an important article for everyone to read.

I mean who knew that this was something that happens.

Surprised.

George

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Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Brian Rohrbacher

Am I correct in thinking that this one
http://www.midwestunlimited.com/store_detail.lasso?-Token.id=10200

will kill you faster than this one?
http://www.midwestunlimited.com/store_detail.lasso?-Token.id=10192

I would think the seat strap takes pressure off the leg straps.  I'm 
thinking the leg straps is what cuts off the circulation.  Is this 
thinking correct?


Also, I printed the article and will deliver it to the fire chief here 
so he knows how to save my ass without killing it.  =-O


George wrote:


Lonnie Nunweiler wrote:


Not sure if you want to modify your advice of tie-of and sit down on
the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength after you read the
following link.  It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not
aware of the dangers in doing so.

http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Safety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm 



Lonnie




I had my guy read this link.

One thing to note, is that the harness with the seat, is not really a 
seat that you sit in and dangle your feet.

It just adds added comfort.

I think that was an important article for everyone to read.

I mean who knew that this was something that happens.

Surprised.

George


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RE: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

2005-08-17 Thread Dustin Jurman
Don't know about that but look at the sala's.

Dustin 

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Brian Rohrbacher
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 6:34 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] The climb safe thread

Am I correct in thinking that this one
http://www.midwestunlimited.com/store_detail.lasso?-Token.id=10200

will kill you faster than this one?
http://www.midwestunlimited.com/store_detail.lasso?-Token.id=10192

I would think the seat strap takes pressure off the leg straps.  I'm
thinking the leg straps is what cuts off the circulation.  Is this thinking
correct?

Also, I printed the article and will deliver it to the fire chief here so he
knows how to save my ass without killing it.  =-O

George wrote:

 Lonnie Nunweiler wrote:

 Not sure if you want to modify your advice of tie-of and sit down on 
 the harness seat, and regain your wind / strength after you read the 
 following link.  It is potentially dangerous advice if you are not 
 aware of the dangers in doing so.

 http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/Safety-HTML/HTML/Will-Your-Sa
 fety-Harness-Kill-You~20040119.htm


 Lonnie



 I had my guy read this link.

 One thing to note, is that the harness with the seat, is not really a 
 seat that you sit in and dangle your feet.
 It just adds added comfort.

 I think that was an important article for everyone to read.

 I mean who knew that this was something that happens.

 Surprised.

 George

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Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

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