Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-02 Thread jree...@18-30chat.net
A 6yo and 3yo (both in may) can do a box of 2000 in about the same
amount of time. The things they do with tools in less time is truly
scary.  

Daddy we fixed the door!
Uhm, what was wrong with it?
Our keys don't fit it now
Yes, you do not have any keys for the door
No, Grayson put glue in it

 The key hole was filled with 'Liquid Nails' in less then 5min. 
Moral Oral says you should never leave a loaded gun in your toolbox.


D. Ryan Spott wrote:
 My 6YO daughter disagrees with the no adhesive seals... She really, 
 really liked daddy's stickers. I occasionally peel evidence of this 
 off the rear window of my truck.

 Now she plays with daddy's zip ties did you know a bag of 300 can be 
 zipped together by a 6 year old in less than 30 minutes?!

 ryan

 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 Ryan, so right on.  I have had to drill this into my installers.  It's a 
 seal not an engine block, you don't need to torque it down.  However you 
 have to get it tight enough that ice sitting on top wont open it up.  You 
 also have to admit that the new no adhesive seals are better.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of D. Ryan Spott
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 4:42 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be 
 torqued down no more!

 Use this method.. no tools required:

 *With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it 
 touches the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes 
 through the cover.
 *With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
 *Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with 
 just enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
 *Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

 After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better 
 yet, you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and 
 you can use a nut-driver.

 ryan

 David Hulsebus wrote:
   
 
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
 the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
 seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
 cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
 replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
 experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 
   
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking 
 about is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire 
 through the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system 
 had a rubber grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the 
 cable through already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an 
 installer 2 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from 
 being a problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 
   
 
 So are you looking

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-02 Thread David Hulsebus
No we just thumb tighten the nuts. The first few we put up years ago we 
tightened them down way too far. We even change the foam now if the 
cover gets removed. Ordered a quite a few just to keep some around.  I 
also noticed that over a couple of years the foam doesn't quite spring 
back like it did new.

Thanks for the input. We started running a bead of silicone across the 
top of the cover. We replaced all the cat5 cable on one of our towers 
yesterday and found one of three showed a water line about 1 up above 
the seal.
Dave

D. Ryan Spott wrote:
 Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be 
 torqued down no more!

 Use this method.. no tools required:

 *With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it 
 touches the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes 
 through the cover.
 *With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
 *Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with 
 just enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
 *Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

 After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better 
 yet, you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and 
 you can use a nut-driver.

 ryan

 David Hulsebus wrote:
   
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
 the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
 seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
 cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
 replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
 experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about 
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through 
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a 
 rubber grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable 
 through already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 
 2 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a 
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 
   
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients 
 with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which 
 could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues 
 by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread 3-dB Networks
So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients with
them.  

There is not going to be a central management system for them... which could
be very problematic

I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues by
now.

In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
the downside availability can be difficult.

I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the RUS
approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimulus
money easier.

Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole different
conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).  

Daniel White
3-dB Networks
http://www.3dbnetworks.com

-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
Behalf Of Rogelio
Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I
was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
vendor.




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Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Matt Larsen - Lists
A few responses here:

1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
units do not seem to have this same problem.
3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

Hope that helps.

Matt Larsen
vistabeam.com



3-dB Networks wrote:
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside availability can be difficult.

 I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the RUS
 approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimulus
 money easier.

 Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole different
 conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).  

 Daniel White
 3-dB Networks
 http://www.3dbnetworks.com

   
 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
 dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

 A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I
 was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
 vendor.


 
 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 
 

 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/
 



 
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Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Steve Barnes
Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but rock 
solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about is that 
you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through the boot 
then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber grommet 
that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through already 
crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2 mistakes of having 
to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a problem.  Tranzeo are good 
units.

Steve Barnes
RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On Behalf 
Of Matt Larsen - Lists
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

A few responses here:

1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
units do not seem to have this same problem.
3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

Hope that helps.

Matt Larsen
vistabeam.com



3-dB Networks wrote:
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside availability can be difficult.

 I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the RUS
 approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimulus
 money easier.

 Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole different
 conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).  

 Daniel White
 3-dB Networks
 http://www.3dbnetworks.com

   
 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
 dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

 A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I
 was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
 vendor.


 
 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 
 

 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/
 



 
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Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Mark Nash
Agreed that they are good CPEs.  Though we've standardized on StarOS for our
clients, we still have a couple hundred Tranzeo TR-CPQ19 CPEs in use on our
StarOS APs (though we're slowly replacing them with StarOS units and
ebay-ing them).

Mark Nash
UnwiredWest
78 Centennial Loop
Suite E
Eugene, OR 97401
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax
http://www.unwiredwest.com
- Original Message - 
From: Steve Barnes st...@pcswin.com
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community


 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but
rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about
is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through
the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber
grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through
already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2
mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a
problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
  So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?
 
  I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to
play
  best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients
with
  them.
 
  There is not going to be a central management system for them... which
could
  be very problematic
 
  I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot
being
  the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these
issues by
  now.
 
  In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make
them
  cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.
 
  Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
  sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since
they
  are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.
On
  the downside availability can be difficult.
 
  I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the
RUS
  approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimul
us
  money easier.
 
  Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole
different
  conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).
 
  Daniel White
  3-dB Networks
  http://www.3dbnetworks.com
 
 
  -Original Message-
  From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
  Behalf Of Rogelio
  Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
  To: WISPA General List
  Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community
 
  I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
  dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.
 
  A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and
I
  was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
  vendor.
 
 

 
  
  WISPA Wants You! Join today!
  http://signup.wispa.org/

 
  
 
  WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org
 
  Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
  http://lists.wispa.org/mailman

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Josh Luthman
Because we all love being on a roof or on the top of a TV tower crimping cat5...

On 4/1/09, Steve Barnes st...@pcswin.com wrote:
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber
 grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through
 already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2
 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients
 with
 them.

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which
 could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot
 being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues
 by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make
 them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since
 they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside availability can be difficult.

 I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the RUS
 approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimulus
 money easier.

 Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole
 different
 conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).

 Daniel White
 3-dB Networks
 http://www.3dbnetworks.com


 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
 dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

 A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I
 was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
 vendor.


 
 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 
 

 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/




 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 

 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Mark Nash
When we climb towers to run new cat5 cable for a unit we're installing,
we've now taken to crimping the cat5  installing it into the enclosure
before we hoist it up.  So we hoist an enclosure with a cat5 inserted into
it at the same time.  Man does this save tower time...

Mark Nash
UnwiredWest
78 Centennial Loop
Suite E
Eugene, OR 97401
541-998-
541-998-5599 fax
http://www.unwiredwest.com
- Original Message - 
From: Josh Luthman j...@imaginenetworksllc.com
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 11:03 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community


 Because we all love being on a roof or on the top of a TV tower crimping
cat5...

 On 4/1/09, Steve Barnes st...@pcswin.com wrote:
  Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there
but
  rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking
about
  is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire
through
  the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a
rubber
  grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable
through
  already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2
  mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a
  problem.  Tranzeo are good units.
 
  Steve Barnes
  RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service
 
  -Original Message-
  From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
  Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
  Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
  To: WISPA General List
  Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community
 
  A few responses here:
 
  1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new
  Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features
  than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS
  or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced
  features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
  2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer
  units do not seem to have this same problem.
  3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly
  designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and
  have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both
  hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a
  plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The
  cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.
  4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I
  did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
  5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of
  Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The
  2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the
  802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.
 
  Hope that helps.
 
  Matt Larsen
  vistabeam.com
 
 
 
  3-dB Networks wrote:
  So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?
 
  I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to
play
  best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients
  with
  them.
 
  There is not going to be a central management system for them... which
  could
  be very problematic
 
  I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot
  being
  the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these
issues
  by
  now.
 
  In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make
  them
  cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.
 
  Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm
not
  sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since
  they
  are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.
On
  the downside availability can be difficult.
 
  I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the
RUS
  approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that
stimulus
  money easier.
 
  Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole
  different
  conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).
 
  Daniel White
  3-dB Networks
  http://www.3dbnetworks.com
 
 
  -Original Message-
  From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org]
On
  Behalf Of Rogelio
  Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
  To: WISPA General List
  Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community
 
  I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
  dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.
 
  A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and
I
  was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
  vendor

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread David Hulsebus
The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
Portative Technologies, LLC
www.portative.com


Steve Barnes wrote:
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about 
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through 
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber 
 grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through 
 already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2 mistakes 
 of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a problem.  Tranzeo 
 are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside availability can be difficult.

 I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the RUS
 approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimulus
 money easier.

 Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole different
 conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).  

 Daniel White
 3-dB Networks
 http://www.3dbnetworks.com

   
 
 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
 dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

 A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I
 was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a
 vendor.


 
 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 
 

 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread D. Ryan Spott
Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be 
torqued down no more!

Use this method.. no tools required:

*With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it 
touches the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes 
through the cover.
*With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
*Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with 
just enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
*Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better 
yet, you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and 
you can use a nut-driver.

ryan

David Hulsebus wrote:
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
 the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
 seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
 cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
 replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
 experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about 
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through 
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber 
 grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through 
 already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2 
 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a 
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside availability can be difficult.

 I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the RUS
 approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that stimulus
 money easier.

 Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole different
 conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).  

 Daniel White
 3-dB Networks
 http://www.3dbnetworks.com

   
 
   
 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Jason Hensley
Only problem I've found with this is that eventually the foam gets worn out
and doesn't spring back and if the plastic cover is not flush with the
unit then it will leak as well.  I've had similar issues to what David
described and have tried it how you describe, tightening down completely,
loosely, etc.  Gotten to where I will put a line of silicone around the top
and sides of the cover to keep water out. 



 

-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
Behalf Of D. Ryan Spott
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 3:42 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be
torqued down no more!

Use this method.. no tools required:

*With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it touches
the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes through the cover.
*With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
*Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with just
enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
*Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better yet,
you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and you can
use a nut-driver.

ryan

David Hulsebus wrote:
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use 
 for the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with 
 water seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom 
 of the cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a 
 tower to replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has 
 anyone else experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but
rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about
is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through
the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber
grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through
already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2
mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a
problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] 
 On Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  
 The 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but 
 the 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem 
 to play best with each other... there has been issues when mixing 
 other clients with them.

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... 
 which could be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a 
 reboot being the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked 
 past these issues by now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps 
 make them cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work
with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm 
 not sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity 
 since they are a cheaper price point

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Steve Barnes
Ryan, so right on.  I have had to drill this into my installers.  It's a seal 
not an engine block, you don't need to torque it down.  However you have to get 
it tight enough that ice sitting on top wont open it up.  You also have to 
admit that the new no adhesive seals are better.

Steve Barnes
RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On Behalf 
Of D. Ryan Spott
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 4:42 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be 
torqued down no more!

Use this method.. no tools required:

*With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it 
touches the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes 
through the cover.
*With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
*Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with 
just enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
*Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better 
yet, you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and 
you can use a nut-driver.

ryan

David Hulsebus wrote:
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
 the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
 seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
 cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
 replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
 experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about 
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through 
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a rubber 
 grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through 
 already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2 
 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a 
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.  On
 the downside availability can

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread D. Ryan Spott
My 6YO daughter disagrees with the no adhesive seals... She really, 
really liked daddy's stickers. I occasionally peel evidence of this 
off the rear window of my truck.

Now she plays with daddy's zip ties did you know a bag of 300 can be 
zipped together by a 6 year old in less than 30 minutes?!

ryan

Steve Barnes wrote:
 Ryan, so right on.  I have had to drill this into my installers.  It's a seal 
 not an engine block, you don't need to torque it down.  However you have to 
 get it tight enough that ice sitting on top wont open it up.  You also have 
 to admit that the new no adhesive seals are better.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of D. Ryan Spott
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 4:42 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be 
 torqued down no more!

 Use this method.. no tools required:

 *With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it 
 touches the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes 
 through the cover.
 *With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
 *Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with 
 just enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
 *Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

 After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better 
 yet, you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and 
 you can use a nut-driver.

 ryan

 David Hulsebus wrote:
   
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
 the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
 seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
 cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
 replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
 experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about 
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through 
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a 
 rubber grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable 
 through already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 
 2 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a 
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the 
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
   
 
   
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients 
 with
 them.  

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which 
 could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these issues 
 by
 now.

 In my opinion

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Steve Barnes
Yeah those little adhesive knockouts for the screw hole made great black warts 
at Halloween time.  My kids used to stick one on their nose and the rest all 
over their little hands as witches.  That's great to know about the zip ties. 
They also learned to use them (50+ at a time) to hold the chest part of 
seatbelts over out of the way and if those weren't available daddy's multi 
colored electrical tape will do.

Steve Barnes
RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On Behalf 
Of D. Ryan Spott
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 7:34 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

My 6YO daughter disagrees with the no adhesive seals... She really, 
really liked daddy's stickers. I occasionally peel evidence of this 
off the rear window of my truck.

Now she plays with daddy's zip ties did you know a bag of 300 can be 
zipped together by a 6 year old in less than 30 minutes?!

ryan

Steve Barnes wrote:
 Ryan, so right on.  I have had to drill this into my installers.  It's a seal 
 not an engine block, you don't need to torque it down.  However you have to 
 get it tight enough that ice sitting on top wont open it up.  You also have 
 to admit that the new no adhesive seals are better.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of D. Ryan Spott
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 4:42 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 Let me guess, you are torquing down the plastic cover until it can be 
 torqued down no more!

 Use this method.. no tools required:

 *With left hand; Press down cover, compressing the foam, until it 
 touches the unit. Perform this right next to where the stud comes 
 through the cover.
 *With right hand tighten nut with fingers until finger tight.
 *Let go of cover with right hand. The foam should spring back with 
 just enough pressure to keep it compressed, but not too compressed.
 *Repeat until done with all 4 nuts.

 After you do this for a while you can do it with one hand... or better 
 yet, you will know how much you should be tightening down the cover and 
 you can use a nut-driver.

 ryan

 David Hulsebus wrote:
   
 The only issue I've had with Tranzeo are the cover and seal they use for 
 the POE. We've followed their directions but have had issues with water 
 seeping into a few units. We now drill small holes in the bottom of the 
 cover to let them drain if needed. We got tired of climbing a tower to 
 replace defective units after a few days of rain..  Has anyone else 
 experienced this? They are the TR5a-2024f series.

 Thanks, Dave Hulsebus
 Portative Technologies, LLC
 www.portative.com


 Steve Barnes wrote:
   
 
 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but 
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking about 
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire through 
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a 
 rubber grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable 
 through already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 
 2 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a 
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new 
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features 
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS 
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced 
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer 
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly 
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and 
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both 
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a 
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The 
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.  
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I 
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of 
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The 
 2.4ghz models

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread 3-dB Networks
Well since I got beat up pretty bad it seems... I'll respond :-)

BTW if you read my last post... I was pretty clear Tranzeo radios are
okay... and can do the job just fine.  In my experience though you will find
many more people that will curse their radios then praise their radios.  I'm
probably somewhere in that middle ground...

Daniel White
3-dB Networks
http://www.3dbnetworks.com


-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 11:22 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

A few responses here:

1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new
Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features
than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS
or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced
features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.

Agreed.  One of the advantages to Tranzeo or 802.11 based gear is that it is
for the most part interoperable.  Yes my experience with Tranzeo is pre
EN-500 series.  But at the end of the day it's still 802.11... :-)

2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer
units do not seem to have this same problem.

I'm glad they FINALLY got that fixed.  Only took them 5 years or so right?

3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly
designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and
have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both
hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a
plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The
cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.

The cases are poorly designed because they are cheap.  The mounting hardware
is cheap.  I've seen the radios fill up with water because they were not
sealed right.  I've also had that plastic break with the CPE just riding
around in my truck (granted something could have hit it I guess).  

On the flip side... I've dropped Canopy radios off of a 100ft tower once
with no damage once so ever.  The cable entrance is the easiest one to deal
with out there.  The radios don't have to be grounded because at no point is
the case metal.  I'll take the Canopy design any day.

4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I
did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.

I think all wireless gear qualifies for RUS funding... it's just RUS
approved gear goes through the process quicker.  Either way, I'm not an
expert on RUS funding :-)

5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of
Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The
2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the
802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

There was also hundreds of thousands of Smartbridge CPE's out there... but I
wouldn't argue that made it a good product.  They work okay in low noise low
client environments. But they work fine for being an 802.11 a/b device.
Personally if I was going this route I would probably look more towards
Ubiquity for CPE's and Mikrotik for AP's... but Tranzeo WILL work. 

Hope that helps.

Matt Larsen
vistabeam.com



3-dB Networks wrote:
 So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?

 I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to
play
 best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other
clients with
 them.

 There is not going to be a central management system for them... which
could
 be very problematic

 I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot
being
 the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these
issues by
 now.

 In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make
them
 cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.

 Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm
not
 sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since
they
 are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.
On
 the downside availability can be difficult.

 I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the
RUS
 approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that
stimulus
 money easier.

 Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole
different
 conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).

 Daniel White
 3-dB Networks
 http://www.3dbnetworks.com


 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org]
On
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus
 dollars

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-04-01 Thread Marlon K. Schafer
I really like them for cpe.  We have hundreds out there.  The only thing 
missing is a reset button :-).

I hate the ap's that I've used so far.  Most work like crap when they get at 
all busy.  Even the newest software isn't helping much.

Think I'll stick with MT for my AP's.  At least until I get a software 
version of the Tranzeo software that makes for a good ap.

marlon

- Original Message - 
From: Mark Nash markl...@uwol.net
To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 11:01 AM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community


 Agreed that they are good CPEs.  Though we've standardized on StarOS for 
 our
 clients, we still have a couple hundred Tranzeo TR-CPQ19 CPEs in use on 
 our
 StarOS APs (though we're slowly replacing them with StarOS units and
 ebay-ing them).

 Mark Nash
 UnwiredWest
 78 Centennial Loop
 Suite E
 Eugene, OR 97401
 541-998-
 541-998-5599 fax
 http://www.unwiredwest.com
 - Original Message - 
 From: Steve Barnes st...@pcswin.com
 To: WISPA General List wireless@wispa.org
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 11:00 AM
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community


 Very Nice Post Matt.  I agree completely.  Few reboots here and there but
 rock solid 98% of the time. The cable boot issue that Matt is talking 
 about
 is that you can't have cables pre-crimped you have to feed the wire 
 through
 the boot then crimp the end on.  Some other manufactures system had a 
 rubber
 grommet that will compress down enough that you can get the cable through
 already crimped and tighten it after the fact.  Takes an installer 2
 mistakes of having to cut ends off and redo to fix that from being a
 problem.  Tranzeo are good units.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service

 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
 Behalf Of Matt Larsen - Lists
 Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 1:22 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 A few responses here:

 1)  You don't have to use Tranzeo APs with Tranzeo CPEs.The new
 Tranzeo APs (EN-500 series) does have a lot more management features
 than the older Tranzeo units (TR-6000, TR-5a).   You can also use StarOS
 or Mikrotik APs and have all the centralized management and advanced
 features that you could possibly want for an 802.11 network.
 2)  The older CPEs do need to be rebooted occasionally.   The newer
 units do not seem to have this same problem.
 3)  I tend to disagree with comments that the cases are poorly
 designed.   The Tranzeo radios have substantial internal grounding and
 have a very high degree of tolerance for environmental extremes, both
 hot and cold.   They are built like tanks compared to the PCB in a
 plastic case design of the Ubiquiti and Motorola Canopy radios.   The
 cable boot is not that bad to work with, but they could be improved.
 4)  Tranzeo is RUS approved.   I would have to dig up the link, but I
 did determine that they will qualify for RUS or stimulus financing.
 5)  They work great for PTMP, and there are hundreds of thousands of
 Tranzeos out in the field providing PTMP service to WISP customers.  The
 2.4ghz models have the same limitations of all 802.11b gear, but the
 802.11a based gear is especially capable and a great value.

 Hope that helps.

 Matt Larsen
 vistabeam.com



 3-dB Networks wrote:
  So are you looking to provide a muni Wi-Fi type setup?
 
  I have used and deployed a few hundred Tranzeo radios... they seem to
 play
  best with each other... there has been issues when mixing other clients
 with
  them.
 
  There is not going to be a central management system for them... which
 could
  be very problematic
 
  I have seen many issues with the management locking up, with a reboot
 being
  the only way to bring it back.  Tranzeo may have worked past these
 issues by
  now.
 
  In my opinion their radio cases are poorly designed, but it helps make
 them
  cheap.  Of note the cable boot can be very difficult to work with.
 
  Overall though, I would deploy Tranzeo in the right situations.  I'm 
  not
  sure you have one of them though.  I would lean towards Ubiquity since
 they
  are a cheaper price point and there are more choices for the firmware.
 On
  the downside availability can be difficult.
 
  I'm also not sure if Tranzeo is RUS approved.  I would start from the
 RUS
  approved list and work from there... as it will make getting that 
  stimul
 us
  money easier.
 
  Now if you're looking to do point to multi-point... it is a whole
 different
  conversation (and not generally in Tranzeo's favor).
 
  Daniel White
  3-dB Networks
  http://www.3dbnetworks.com
 
 
  -Original Message-
  From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] 
  On
  Behalf Of Rogelio
  Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:34 AM
  To: WISPA General List
  Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural

Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-03-31 Thread Steve Barnes
If you are starting out looking at CPE's, it is my opinion that you are 
starting at the wrong end. Maybe you already have this all thought out and 
planned. Tranzeo is a fine product I own hundreds of them.  However, you need 
to start at the beginning and look at internet backhaul, then the distribution 
to the towers and how you're going to manage clients.  Then you need to 
determine the proper frequencies for your location which is determined by Line 
of sight obstacles and noise from competitors and other factors. These will all 
lead to a decision as to what equipment is best suited for your location.  That 
is the right step.  Deciding on the equipment you want to use then trying to 
make it fit your location will cause you countless hours of frustration.

Tranzeo makes a great line of 2.4 CPE's. Consistent in quality and look.  Price 
is OK as long as you buy in quantity.  There are other options that may give 
you better control depending on your circumstances.  Don't start out without 
traveling some and discussing the growing pains with someone who has been there 
and who is not your closest competitor.  

You might also look at partnerships with other WISP's in your area.  It is 
always good to have someone to fall back-on when the going gets tough (and it 
will).

My opinion. And like butt-holes everyone has one and most shouldn't let theirs 
out. But I just did.

Steve Barnes
RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On Behalf 
Of Rogelio
Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:34 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus 
dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I 
was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a vendor.



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Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-03-31 Thread Rogelio
Thanks, Steve. Your advice is helpful.

(I actually already have all of the other vendor pieces. I am now just 
looking for CPE devices to put on the roofs of the houses that subscribe.)





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Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-03-31 Thread Martha Huizenga
Definitely good info Steve. Sometimes we need people to put out their 
opinion before we make the wrong move. This wasn't controversial at all, 
just good points. I like that kind of post!

Martha Huizenga
DC Access, LLC
202-546-5898
*/Friendly, Local, Affordable, Internet!/**/
Connecting the Capitol Hill Community

/*



Steve Barnes wrote:
 If you are starting out looking at CPE's, it is my opinion that you are 
 starting at the wrong end. Maybe you already have this all thought out and 
 planned. Tranzeo is a fine product I own hundreds of them.  However, you need 
 to start at the beginning and look at internet backhaul, then the 
 distribution to the towers and how you're going to manage clients.  Then you 
 need to determine the proper frequencies for your location which is 
 determined by Line of sight obstacles and noise from competitors and other 
 factors. These will all lead to a decision as to what equipment is best 
 suited for your location.  That is the right step.  Deciding on the equipment 
 you want to use then trying to make it fit your location will cause you 
 countless hours of frustration.

 Tranzeo makes a great line of 2.4 CPE's. Consistent in quality and look.  
 Price is OK as long as you buy in quantity.  There are other options that may 
 give you better control depending on your circumstances.  Don't start out 
 without traveling some and discussing the growing pains with someone who has 
 been there and who is not your closest competitor.  

 You might also look at partnerships with other WISP's in your area.  It is 
 always good to have someone to fall back-on when the going gets tough (and it 
 will).

 My opinion. And like butt-holes everyone has one and most shouldn't let 
 theirs out. But I just did.

 Steve Barnes
 RCWiFi Wireless Internet Service


 -Original Message-
 From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On 
 Behalf Of Rogelio
 Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:34 PM
 To: WISPA General List
 Subject: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

 I'm looking into setting up wi-fi for rural county (using stimulus 
 dollars) and am now looking for CPE devices to put on each rooftop.

 A past coworker told me that he's heard good things about Tranzeo, and I 
 was wondering what others here on the list thought about them as a vendor.


 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 
  
 WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/


 
 WISPA Wants You! Join today!
 http://signup.wispa.org/
 
  
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 Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
 http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/

   



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Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

2009-03-31 Thread Jason Hensley
I would second what Steve has said as well, but my questino to you would be
that if you have all other vendor pieces figured out, why not stay with your
AP vendor for your CPE's?  Depending on AP's, you might actually HAVE to
stay with the same vendor.  I would hop you have considered that as well.
We have a second network that we inherited from a company we merged with
that would supposedly support generic CPE's.  Well, it does, but it takes
some workarounds to make it work like we want. 

My personal experience with Tranzeo is mixed.  I have a few Tranzeo AP's,
and some CPE's, that have been in the air for about 4 years that I never
have to touch.  But, I went through a time about 2.5 years ago when Tranzeo
evidently had a bad run of CPE's or something and it burned me on them.  I
got some Deliberant gear in and wouldn't change it for the world.
Deliberant, at least at that time, offered better features, better support,
and a better price.  Not sure how they compare now though, but I think the
situation is about the same.  Only thing I have negative on Deliberant
radios is that their interface is still a bit slow, but I really think
they're making improvements over what it was at one time. 
 

 

-Original Message-
From: wireless-boun...@wispa.org [mailto:wireless-boun...@wispa.org] On
Behalf Of Rogelio
Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:14 PM
To: Steve Barnes
Cc: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Using Tranzeo as CPE for rural community

Thanks, Steve. Your advice is helpful.

(I actually already have all of the other vendor pieces. I am now just
looking for CPE devices to put on the roofs of the houses that subscribe.)






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