Re: [WSG] HTML5 offline storage question

2010-08-09 Thread Jody Tate
Asking why not just use the cache is a valid question. 

In this case, using HTML5 storage to house files doesn't seem to be tapping 
into all HTML5 storage can do--but it's not violating what storage can do 
either (so far as I know).

HTML5 storage is like cookies: Simply put, it’s a way for web pages to store 
named key/value pairs locally, within the client web browser. Like cookies, 
this data persists even after you navigate away from the web site, close your 
browser tab, exit your browser, or what have you. Unlike cookies, this data is 
never transmitted to the remote web server (unless you go out of your way to 
send it manually). That's from: 
http://diveintohtml5.org/storage.html#localstorage

So, HTML5 storage is more for data storage--storing key/value pairs (like 
massive cookies)--than just a repository of files. This is how I understand it. 
Others may know more. 

I'd think a iPhone/iPad native app would want to look beyond HTML5 storage and 
into File Management. But if this is a web app, then HTML5 storage might be the 
only option. But I'm far from being an expert. 

-jody




On Aug 9, 2010, at 12:59 AM, Josh Godsiff wrote:

 I avoid Apple products like the plague, so perhaps I'm missing some info 
 here, but what's wrong with simply getting the user to download the file 
 in the normal fashion?
 
 - Josh
 
 On 9/8/2010 3:11 PM, Breton Slivka wrote:
 The iPhone has a 5mb upper limit per page. I think the ipad's limit is 10mb 
 but I am not sure. So in other words, no.
 
 -Breton
 
 On 09/08/2010, at 2:55 PM, Andrew Harrisand...@woowoowoo.com  wrote:
 
 
 Hi all, I'm asking around the traps on a question which has come up at work.
 
 We want to develop an iPad app to will allow users to download from a
 website (like a synch) large quantities (hundreds of MB) of documents
 (pdf and word) for reading offline.
 
 Is the offline storage tool in HTML5 designed for this sort of heavy 
 lifting?
 are there storage limitations?
 on an iPad?
 
 I've found a few examples of the tool in action and read bits and
 pieces, but it all seems to be about storing small chunks of data, not
 humunguous great whumps of it.
 
 -- 
 Andrew Harris
 and...@woowoowoo.com
 http://www.woowoowoo.com
 
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[WSG] @media ordering in stylesheet

2010-08-05 Thread Jody Tate
Hi all,

Does @media rule ordering in a stylesheet matter? For example, given the 
following order:

@media print {
body { 
#FF;
}
}

@media all {
body { 
#99;
}
}

Will @media print override the @media all in this ordering?

Googling around, I've not found a clear answer to the question. So, any help is 
appreciated. 

Thanks in advance,
jody

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Re: [WSG] @media ordering in stylesheet

2010-08-05 Thread Jody Tate
Thanks for the responses. I needed the experts in the group to confirm my 
suspicions. 

Best,
jody

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Re: [WSG] EM bug in Safari 5?

2010-07-30 Thread Jody Tate
If this helps: my MacBook Pro is about 2 months old and Safari's default is 
16px. 

-jody


On Jul 30, 2010, at 11:38 AM, tee wrote:

 
 
 
 I had this issue to then I checked safari's default font size and it
 was set to 12px instead of 16px like the other browsers.  Once I
 changed that setting to 16px then they all looked the same.  I would
 suggest verifying in your browsers that they all have the same px size
 set for their default font size before testing.
 
 Thanks for bringing this up. I changed it and now Safari renders the width 
 similar to others.
 
 This is very strange! The font size in my Safari is 14px. I'd just had this 
 computer about 6 months ago, and have no memory I altered the font size for 
 the reason I did in previous machine (mentioned in my previous email).
 
 Other browsers have default 16px. 
 
 Do you have idea how Safari makes the calculation that resulted 121px 
 differences with 14px font size setting when width is set to 62em.
 
 tee
 
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Re: [WSG] link rel=stylesheet question

2010-07-20 Thread Jody Tate
Many thanks to those who respond to the link rel=stylesheet question, 

Best,
jody


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[WSG] link rel=stylesheet question

2010-07-17 Thread Jody Tate
Hello all,

In a stylesheet link, does the order of rel, href and type affect how a browser 
understands, loads, etc. a stylesheet?

I usually see the rel attribute first, as in the example below, but does the 
order of attributes matter or is the order convention, convention meaning, 
that's what most people do?

link rel=stylesheet href=screen.css type=text/css /

Thanks in advance,
jody



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Re: [WSG] Overflow hidden and floated divs

2010-07-15 Thread Jody Tate
I asked a similar question back in February and this link helped explain it:

http://www.quirksmode.org/css/clearing.html

-jody


On Jul 15, 2010, at 8:11 AM, Stevio wrote:

 I have a row of floated list items inside a container with height 1.2em, 
 which is inside a parent div with a background colour.
 
 e.g. something like this (not the actual HTML of course ;) -
 div with background colour
  ul with height 1.2em
li floated/li
li floated/li
li floated/li
  /ul
 /div
 
 If the floated list items were too wide, the rightmost list item jumped down 
 beneath, but the container did not expand so it looked bad.
 
 However, if I add overflow:hidden; to the parent div, then the rightmost 
 list item still jumps down, but now the box expands down the way, so it 
 looks a lot better.
 
 My question is why does it do this? I have looked up what overflow hidden is 
 meant to do and from what I read it sounds like the content should just get 
 clipped at the right hand side and not be shown. Why is it causing the box 
 to expand down the way?
 
 Thanks.
 
 Here is the CSS:
 
 #navigationbar {
 background-color:#DEDEDE;
 overflow:hidden;
 }
 #navigationbar ul {
 padding: 0.2em 0 0.2em 0;
 margin: 0px;
 list-style: none;
 height:1.2em;
 }
 #navigationbar ul li {
 padding: 0;
 margin: 0;
 display: block;
 float: left;
 } 
 
 
 
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[WSG] the mysteries of overflow: hidden

2010-02-10 Thread Jody Tate
(I'm a list lurker. Also, apologies if this has been covered before.)

In CSS, setting a div to overflow: hidden solves a problem it shouldn't--at 
least from the name of the property and value, it seems like it shouldn't. 

Often I'll have text, e.g. an h1, overflowing its containing/parent div, but 
setting the containing/parent div to overflow: hidden causes the parent div 
to set its height in a way that the formerly overflowing text no longer 
overflows. 

I've seen this happen for years. Another developer showed me this fix years 
ago. But over the years, I've never read an explanation why overflow: hidden 
fixes a problem its name implies it wouldn't. 

Have others seen this? Any explanations? 

-jody




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Re: [WSG] Appropriate postings

2008-08-05 Thread Jody Tate
I'm a lurker on the list, but primarily because the list, so far, has seemed
like a place where people come for help solving specific, remedial problems
with long-standing (in internet-time) solutions well-documented on the
internet and in books.

On 8/5/08 11:10 AM, Rick Faircloth [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 And I would like to know what a list on any subject is for if not for helping
 people understand the most basic principles and application of a give
 practice.
 A list on any topic must embrace all level of participants, beginners and
 advanced, alike.

If we think of the list as a classroom, a teaching environment, then it's
standard practice to have separate beginning, advanced, etc. classes. At the
university level, for example (in the US), classes at the 100 level tackle
different issues than classes at the 200, 300 and 400 level.

A list on a topic isn't required to embrace all levels of expertise. I've
participated in many mailings lists where some requests for basic help were
considered off-topic. Requests for help when answers can be found by via
searches or reading books were often seen as inappropriate.

I'd advocate (at the risk of sounding snobby), as some have suggested, for
different lists--one to accommodate beginners and another to accommodate
other developers interested, not in help with standards, but in the
standards themselves.

 Anyone who thinks a list about web standards should not first have as its
 mission
 to teach and clarify the basics of the tools of standardization, such as CSS,
 is
 mistaken.  Unless expressly stated, a list must cater to the lowest common
 denominator of its participants, not the highest.  By doing so, those on the
 bottom
 are lifted up, instead of always being pushed down and kept in the dark.

To think a list about web standards doesn't need to have teaching as its
first mission is not mistaken, it's considering that a different goal or
multiple goals might be acceptable.

Web standards are not new, though they may be new to some list users.
Teaching can be a function, but if helping others with the basics is its
sole function, as it's becoming here, it neglects another portion of the
list's members, those who have been using web standards since their
inception and hope to have extended discussions about, for example, XHTML
vs. HTML5, CSS3, current and upcoming browser implementation of standards,
emerging standards and so on.

-jody

--
Jody Tate
http://staff.washington.edu/jtate/






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Re: [WSG] html vs. html

2008-06-19 Thread jody tate
After much googling around (I was fascinated by this question) and  
much reading of various W3C documents here and there, I can say with  
about 97.3% certainty that the W3C has never drafted a recommendation  
that standardized file extensions. Most of their recommendations  
include URI examples that use the .html extension and the site itself  
appears to use .html extensions: http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/Cover.html.


The real story of why .htm and three letter extensions were ever used  
is told in a round about way here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filename_extension 
.


Given the history of filename extensions, I can see how someone might  
think that a three-letter extension is required (and maybe--for some  
strange reason--the server's settings do require html to be served  
as .htm and .html files are served differently). Whatever the case,  
the W3C doesn't recommend .htm as a standard.


--
Jody Tate
Web Developer - UW Network Systems
http://staff.washington.edu/jtate/




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Re: [WSG] Marking Up Poems

2008-06-19 Thread jody tate
I'd stress what Jon Tan wrote:  My recommendation would be p for  
stanzas and br / line breaks for most verse. Stanzas are usually  
taught as the paragraph of poetry and verses are referred to as line  
breaks.


Side note you're free to ignore: I'd argue most of the historical bits  
below are incorrect in the details, but are correct in general.  
Jonson's _English Grammar_ is a great snapshot of the period's grammar  
eccentricities, but hardly a guide that was followed--he didn't care  
enough to publish it while alive despite how careful he was about  
publication (I did a Ph.D. one Shakespeare and taught medieval, early  
modern and modern poetry for eight years before the siren call of web  
work).


-jody

--
Jody Tate
Web Developer - UW Network Systems
http://staff.washington.edu/jtate/


On Jun 19, 2008, at 3:06 AM, Jon Tan wrote:

Historically each stanza in a poem is a paragraph. Layout (new  
lines) began punctuating paragraphs in the later Middle Ages. Prior  
to that the lines ran into one another with punctuation used to  
indicate where breaths and breaks in the running text occurred [1].  
Syntactic punctuation was not commonplace until after Ben Johnson's  
English Grammar in 1640. That means that layout /is/ punctuation for  
modern poetry, so markup needs to reflect that. My recommendation  
would be p for stanzas and br / line breaks for most verse. To  
do anything that returns stanzas to running text when CSS is  
disabled would break the syntax of the verse /unless/ lines are  
specifically punctuated with something other than a break at the  
end; a comma for example. pre is an alternative but does not  
punctuate line ends at all, except visually. It would be interesting  
to know how alternative browsers handle both br /s and single/ 
double line breaks in pre blocks. Do they inject a pause or other  
aural boundary?










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Re: [WSG] premature to test/worry new site for IE8?

2008-03-26 Thread jody tate
IE8's default setting will be to render web pages in standards- 
compliant mode. You can opt out of standards compliance with a meta  
tag. It was originally announced as the reverse. They changed their  
mind once the mob headed toward the castle in Redmond with pitchforks.


Like most of us, If I could bill MS for all the time I've spent  
debugging/hacking web pages for IE, I'd be a rich man. But I've been  
using and testing the IE8 beta since it was released, and I'd hazard  
that if you're writing standards compliant (x)html and css, all should  
be well (more or less) with the final release. The efforts of the IE  
development team, while not always stellar in the past, genuinely seem  
to be going in the right direction. They're working with the Web  
Standards Project and other groups to ensure IE8 isn't the disaster  
that IE6 and 7 have been.


--
Jody Tate
Web Developer - UW Network Systems
http://staff.washington.edu/jtate/



On Mar 21, 2008, at 3:52 AM, tee wrote:
I am about to start coding for a new site, and client asked me to  
make sure my code will work for IE8, meaning when IE 8 comes out,  
she doesn't need to pay me extra to fix any problem that may occur  
in IE 8. Client is from a web media company, though I understand her  
concerns and that she has to answer to her client, but I just don't  
know how or if I should commit to such 'expectation'.


Last time with IE 7, there was no problem and none of the sites I  
coded for her break when  IE 7 came out. I think this version  
targeting thing really got people worry.


Say, I code my CSS with best practice just like I'd always do, and  
treat IE browsers with CC should it be needed. Do I need to worry  
anything with IE8? It didn't occur to me to worry anything at all  
until client was making this request.


Thanks!

tee


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[WSG] generated source

2008-02-26 Thread jody tate
Does anyone have a preferred way to view and validate generated source  
code? By generated source I mean after Ajax, JavaScript, and so on  
have done their magic.


I'm asking because I'm working on a web application for browsing  
network devices (close to 9000 routers, switches, WAPs, etc.) that  
relies on JavaScript (some homemade JS, jQuery, Ajax and JSON) to  
build virtually all the XHTML. Yet, when I view source via the debug  
inspect element feature in the latest release of Safari or using  
Pederick's web developer Firefox add-on, closed tags become unclosed.  
For example:


meta http-equiv=Content-Type content=text/html; charset=UTF-8 /

Becomes:

meta http-equiv=Content-Type content=text/html; charset=UTF-8

Yet viewing generated source in Firebug, that same meta tag remains  
closed. Firebug, however, doesn't have (or I haven't noticed?) a way  
to copy and paste source code for direct input validation to the W3C  
validator. This, then, is the ultimate goal: to get the generated  
source, copy it and paste it into a validator. I validated with static  
mockups prior to de-building the XHTML and giving it over to  
JavaScript, but I want to validate now to make sure I'm staying on  
track.


Have others run into this problem?

Thanks in advance,
Jody

--
Jody Tate
Web Developer - UW Network Systems
http://staff.washington.edu/jtate/








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Re: [WSG] generated source

2008-02-26 Thread jody tate

Thanks, Paul, for the suggestion.

Doctype, I don't think, is the issue. The doctype is set in the static  
XHTML that the Ajax builds on as XHTML strict. However, most generated  
source views remove the doctype, a phenomenon I asked about here: http://ask.metafilter.com/84314/Where-does-the-DTD-go 
.


The W3C validator lets you re-declare a doctype if one is missing, http://validator.w3.org/#validate_by_input+with_options 
, but even using that option, many of my tags are still already  
unclosed from the generated source view.


-jody





On Feb 26, 2008, at 11:37 AM, Paul Bennett wrote:


Hi Jody,

I recall having a similar problem. The issue came down (from memory)  
to the doctype I was using. I was closing elements in xhtml style,  
while the doctype I was using was html.


Firefox was happily removing the extraneous closing elements in the  
rendered source to fit the doctype.


:)
Paul


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