Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-11 Thread Mathew Robertson
I've been working with he data generated by surveys, for quite a number of years and tip that I can give that applies in example is that a boolean question (aka Yes/No) is represented by 4 states, when asked in a web form, i.e. - no response was saved, eg form was served correctly, form was

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-08 Thread Steve Gibbings
Agreed it does depend entirely on the situation and users. By universally implemented I wasn't being flippant, I meant to be saying that things have moved on, just the modified model of radio set use doesn't work everywhere. For some reason undefined/unset radio button sets get overlooked by

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-08 Thread Steve Gibbings
lol, well yes but then that would be attempting to break the input device on real radios. Funnily we must be twins because as a kid I used to try to do that too. I broke so much stuff... On 8 Jun 2010, at 05:39, Lucien Stals wrote: And I seem to recall that the old radios on which the

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-08 Thread Steve Gibbings
Agreed it does depend entirely on the situation and users. By universally implemented I wasn't being flippant, I meant to be saying that things have moved on, just the modified model of radio set use doesn't work everywhere. For some reason undefined/unset radio button sets get overlooked by

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-07 Thread Ben Buchanan
On 7 June 2010 14:58, Steve Gibbings st...@stevegibbings.co.uk wrote: I have a problem with that. Radio button sets should always have an option selected, there is no undefined selection. This makes sense when you remember where the radio button metaphor came from. However seems that

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-07 Thread Lucien Stals
And I seem to recall that the old radios on which the metaphor is based could be pushed half in. That would cause all buttons to pop out thus having *no* selection. Not saying that as a justification for having no selection in a radio group. Just pointing out that the metaphor wears a bit thin

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-07 Thread Hassan Schroeder
Lucien Stals wrote: And I seem to recall that the old radios on which the metaphor is based could be pushed half in. That would cause all buttons to pop out thus having *no* selection. Poor implementations don't define a design pattern. :-) -- Hassan Schroeder -

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-06 Thread Ben Buchanan
On 4 June 2010 12:29, nedlud ned...@gmail.com wrote: I have a web form I'm building and there is a simple yes/no question in it. I got to wondering what the best semantic mark up for this is? Does anyone have any good UI/UX suggestions? My three ideas were... Two radio buttons for yes and

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-06 Thread Steve Gibbings
I have a problem with that. Radio button sets should always have an option selected, there is no undefined selection. This makes sense when you remember where the radio button metaphor came from. However seems that doesn't get universally implemented. On 7 Jun 2010, at 02:25, Ben Buchanan

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-04 Thread Krystian Szastok
John, thank you for the book recommendation, I was waiting for someone to quote one, so I don't have to make a new thread :) Kind regards, Krystian In addition to my thoughts I had a look into the Robert Hoekman Jr book Designing the Obvious and in Chapter 16 about Simplifying Long Forms he

RE: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-04 Thread michael.brockington
There is actually a fourth option, which is a pair of buttons, which is a good idea if both choices require an action, such as feeding on to a different form, or if this is the last action of the form. For me, the main thing to think about is 'negative responses' - with a radio button you get

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-04 Thread Lea de Groot
On 4/06/10 2:41 PM, nedlud wrote: The full questions in the form is Do you require an interpreter? This is followed by: If so, what language? Personally, I would try this structure: Do you require a translator? o No o Yes [] Greek | {I require a Greek Translator written in greek} []

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-03 Thread John Unsworth
Hi Lucien, The first thing that occurs to me regarding the semantics of the action is what is the Yes/No proposition in regards to, and that this might provide a clearer notion as to what to do. By this what I mean is, in the first instance so far as semantic mark up is concerned it would appear

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-03 Thread nedlud
Hmm. I hadn't considered the wording of the actual question to be so important. But I can sure see your point. The full questions in the form is Do you require an interpreter? This is followed by: If so, what language? I am porting a paper based for onto the web, and the paper based version has

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-03 Thread Gregorio Hernández Caso
Hi Lucien, In my opinion, this is the best structure for yes/no options: pDo you...?/p labelinput type=radio name=ans value=yes Yes/label labelinput type=radio name=ans value=no No/label Cheers, Greg On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 11:41 PM, nedlud ned...@gmail.com wrote: Hmm. I hadn't considered

Re: [WSG] Yes/No structure?

2010-06-03 Thread John Unsworth
Lucien, Interestingly the Robert Hoekman Jr example I cited started originally as a paper form. In his write up when the form was first put up online before he came along it ran to page after page, resulting in people never completing it! In your example the first thing that strikes me, but this