Greg, the only problem I can see here is there is a whole bunch of 
chemistry and even more engineering between the start and finish, and 
can this be done in an energy efficient manner.  Or would it be more 
efficient to just burn the glycerin in some sort of bulk oil burner?


Greg Harbican wrote:

>Todd and Bob,
>        
>    I'm was thinking of this message from Walt Patrick:
>
>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biofuel/message/30084
>
>The relevant part, is this paragraph:
>
>    "Another nifty patent to come down the pike involves using a 36 volt arc to
>decompose a solution of some organic in water producing syngas. Because of
>the presence of a carbon material, the plasma from the arc generates not a
>mix of H2 and O2, but rather H2 and CO. Whereas the former is explosive,
>the latter is not and can be stored for later conversion to methanol, which
>in turn can be used as an automotive fuel."
>
>I am thinking that it should be possible to use a glycerin / water solution to 
>produce syngas and from there catalyze it to methanol, without the use of high 
>temps or bacteria.
>
>Greg H. 
>
>
>    
>
>----- Original Message ----- 
>From: Appal Energy 
>To: biofuel@yahoogroups.com 
>Sent: Thursday, June 10, 2004 15:18
>Subject: Re: [biofuel] Making Methanol from Glycerin ( was Re: Biodiesel 
>Glycerin-to-Methanol Condensor plans )
>
>
>You can always ferment glycerol into ethanol, that is if you don't mind
>working with the strains of botulinum bacteria necessary to get high
>conversions.
>
>And yup. You probably could get methanol from glycerol, if the appropriate
>fractionating and pressurization equipment were available.
>
>He would need a chemical engineer on this one.
>
>Todd Swearingen
>
>
>And:
>  ----- Original Message ----- 
>  From: bob allen 
>  To: biofuel@yahoogroups.com 
>  Sent: Thursday, June 10, 2004 14:45
>  Subject: Re: [biofuel] Making Methanol from Glycerin ( was Re: Biodiesel 
> Glycerin-to-Methanol Condensor plans )
>
>
>  no problem in principle.   Any  starch/sugar/cellulosic material can be 
>  thermally degraded to  to a mixture of gases  and light liquids.(often 
>  referred to as destructive distillation)  Catalytic reforming should 
>  yield methanol.  The only problem, an engineering feat rather than a 
>  chemical problem would be optimizing yield.  On an industrial scale, you 
>  only get about a 50 % energy return going from green timber to 
>  methanol.  A bacterial fermentation may also be possible to produce 
>  methanol or other alcohols from glycerol. 
>
>
>
>
>
>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
>
>Biofuel at Journey to Forever:
>http://journeytoforever.org/biofuel.html
>
>Biofuels list archives:
>http://infoarchive.net/sgroup/biofuel/
>
>Please do NOT send Unsubscribe messages to the list address.
>To unsubscribe, send an email to:
>[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
>Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
> 
>
>
>  
>


-- 
Bob Allen, http://ozarker.org/bob
=========================================================
The modern conservative is engaged in one of Man's oldest exercises in moral 
philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for 
selfishness  JKG



------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~--> 
Yahoo! Domains - Claim yours for only $14.70
http://us.click.yahoo.com/Z1wmxD/DREIAA/yQLSAA/FGYolB/TM
--------------------------------------------------------------------~-> 

Biofuel at Journey to Forever:
http://journeytoforever.org/biofuel.html

Biofuels list archives:
http://infoarchive.net/sgroup/biofuel/

Please do NOT send Unsubscribe messages to the list address.
To unsubscribe, send an email to:
[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/biofuel/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
     [EMAIL PROTECTED]

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 


Reply via email to