I don't know if you could. It wasn't created by a music publisher that the RIAA or any of the fee-collection agencies have an agreement with, was it? Put another way, I make a music CD on my own, and I sell it in a few local stores. A DJ from a local radio station (say its owned by Clearwater Communications, they own what, 33% of all the radio stations in America or some ridiculous number) buys it any plays it on the air. I never made an agreement with anyone negotiating how much I'd ask for for playing my music. Does everyone get the same flat fee and magically a check just appears in my mailbox with *no* agreement whatsoever and that's the end of that, all legal and tidy? That doesn't sound right, but I know just about nothing about this process.

PS - If I did make a music CD and a large radio station did play it, I probably wouldn't complain too loudly. Their listeners on the other hand, that's another story...


On Jun 8, 2004, at 1:11 PM, Feldhamer, Stuart wrote:

Of course, your alternative is to petition your local radio station to play the Origin soundtrack. :)

Stuart

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Leonard [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2004 1:01 PM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: [SWCollect] Another one?!


[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

I believe that this is as illegal as copying *ANY* music file.

Why doesn't Jim just bid on it, and then he can do what he wants with the music?

Because it wouldn't be any more legal that way (I have no explicit permission
from Origin to stream the music). In all honesty, I just want to hear it. I
have no intention of collecting it. I'm not a fan of the music per se, I just
want to hear how it turned out.


I can see a morality issue coming, so I'm going to head it off: For older
games that you are curious about, do you download a copy to try, or do you
spend $150 or more to collect a copy you can open and play? For example, I
have never played Starcross and would like to give it a try. Should I spend
crazy amounts of money for a Starcross collectable, knowing that any money I
spend will never get back to the people who made it (and the collectable itself
will go down in value when I open it to get at the disk), or should I just
download a copy and try it out? Hopefully you agree the latter is the more
practical choice.


Before anyone accuses me of being a pirate, I own 600+ new and collectable
games. I also own 100+ music CDs and 100+ DVDs. I do buy things, you know :-)
I just don't feel I need to collect something just to give it a shot.
--
Jim Leonard ([EMAIL PROTECTED])
World's largest electronic gaming project: http://www.MobyGames.com/
A delicious slice of the demoscene: http://www.MindCandyDVD.com/
Various oldskool PC rants and ramblings: http://www.oldskool.org/



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