St. Catharines was founded by Loyalists, so they would have been English
speaking making comparing with Quebecois names isn't the greatest idea.
Ontario's place names generally have more in common with British convention
than with French/Quebecois historical conventions.  The city's corporate
name uses "St." as does all city and provincial spellings of their name.
In the end, the province has the authority to make a municipal name
"official" and their spelling is only ever found as "St." in any document.

-Kevin Farrugia
kevinfarru...@gmail.com

On 19 February 2018 at 15:31, Ga Delap <gade...@gmail.com> wrote:

> > Date: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 23:56:20 +0100
> > From: Jarek Piórkowski <ja...@piorkowski.ca>
> > Cc: talk-ca@openstreetmap.org
> > Subject: Re: [Talk-ca] Formatting of Municipality Names
> > Message-ID:
>         <CACV3h2kMEzPz15tvhfW=xFULLxiphmJe=0+qELtpT8PEYs_c8w@mail.
> gmail.com>
> > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> > ... It is not clear to me that "Saint Catharines" is the
> > correct unabbreviated version of the city's name. In fact it looks
> > incorrect to me.
>
> > --Jarek
>
> Since St-Catharines is of french origin, why don't you look at what they
> did on the other side of your language border?
>   Sainte-Catherine
>   Sainte-Catherine-de-Hatley
>   Sainte-Adèle
>   etc
>
> dega
>
>
>
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