Begin forwarded message:

From: "Paul Seletsky" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Date: November 15, 2005 6:00:36 AM PST
To: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: AIANY - SOM Technology Symposium 2005


Special Event

SOM BUILDING SCIENCE & DESIGN RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM '05



Date:  Friday, November 18th, 2005
Time:  Morning Session 9:30am to 12:30pm ET
Time:  Afternoon Session 1:30pm to 6:00pm ET

Date:  Saturday, November 19th, 2005
Time:  9:30am to 1:00pm ET

Location: Center for Architecture. 536 LaGuardia Place (Between Bleecker and W.3rd Street), Main Lecture Hall (Lower Level), NYC Transportation: 6/F/S/V Trains to Bleecker St./BWay-Lafayette (Walk 3 blocks West+1 block North) N,R Trains to Prince St (Walk 2 blocks West +2 blocks North) A/C/E/F/V/S Trains to W4th St (Walk 3 blocks East+1 block South)

PLEASE NOTE: SEATING FOR THIS EVENT IS LIMITED. YOU MUST RSVP to [EMAIL PROTECTED] IN ORDER TO ATTEND. Admission: FREE





EMERGING MATERIALS, SYSTEMS INTELLIGENCE, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT



The 2nd annual SOM Building Science and Design Research Symposium is structured around three half-day general sessions: The keynote address will explore the power of complex natural systems to serve as model and metaphor in architecture and engineering. Special sessions will explore the use of computational tools in designing and fabricating complex form and the nature of sustainability.





SESSION I. DESIGN EXPRESSION IN EMERGING MATERIALS (Friday Morning, Nov. 18, 9:30am – 12:30pm)



EXPRESSIVE POTENTIAL OF EMERGING MATERIALS

Many emerging materials offer the potential to create new and expressive forms in architecture. Exploiting that potential requires understanding the fundamental characteristics and behaviors of emerging materials and a close reading of the unique application domains found in architecture. It also requires a very selective and strategic approach aimed at accomplishing clear functional and performance goals.



STRUCTURAL POTENTIAL OF EMERGING MATERIALS

In recent years, a number of factors have motivated the development and use of improved structural materials and manufacturing processes, including: demand for unique performance requirements, demand for improved performance or extended life of existing products, the availability of new manufacturing methods and cost reduction requirements. Improved modeling capabilities have also increased our knowledge-base and the ability to tailor materials to specific applications.



APPLICATIONS: EMERGING MATERIALS





SESSION II. SYSTEMS INTELLIGENCE (Friday Afternoon, Nov. 18, 1:30pm – 6:0pm)



DETECTION AND RESPONSE MANAGEMENT

Automated hardware/software systems that integrate chemical detectors, closed-circuit TV, dispersion modeling, and optimal response protocols can improve detection and reaction to complex terrorist attacks involving chemical agents. These systems may provide accurate, early detection and verification in confined spaces, such as in city buildings and urban transportation systems, and may reduce loss of life and enhance rescue and recovery operations.



STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

Structural health monitoring is the process of damage detection in aerospace, mechanical and civil infrastructure. It involves the observation of a system or structure over time using dynamic response measurements from an array of sensors. The extraction of damage-sensitive indicators from these measurements, and the statistical analysis of these indicators, are then used to determine the current state of a system’s or a structure’s health. After extreme events, such as earthquakes or blast loading, structural health monitoring may be used to rapidly screen conditions and to provide, in near real time, reliable information regarding the current integrity of the structure.



APPLICATIONS: STATE OF THE ART INTELLIGENT STRUCTURES



KEYNOTE ADDRESS: EMERGENCE AND NATURAL SYSTEMS AS MODEL AND METAPHOR

Emerging structures are complex patterns or structures formed by the interaction of simple rules and events. They can be found in nature and in the self-organizing neighborhoods that frequently appear in cities. Emergence suggests that buildings can be viewed as complex energy and material systems that have a given lifespan and exist as part of the environment of other buildings.



SPECIAL EVENT: COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION TOOLS

Conventional practice is increasingly exploiting the potential of sophisticated design and information modeling tools. There remain, however, significant obstacles to the flow of digital building information to manufacturers and fabricators, and therefore obstacles to realizing the full potential of these tools. Successfully bridging the conventional divide between these activities will provide compelling opportunities for formal exploration and architectural innovation. Creating robust collaboration across the design, information modeling, prototyping, and fabrication stages of a project, by exploiting the innovative power of seamless digital design processes, will help transform the creation of current architecture to that of a new paradigm.





SESSION III. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (Saturday Morning, Nov. 19, 9:30am – 1:00pm)



INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

Industrial ecology is the study of how societies can deliberately and rationally maintain a desirable carrying capacity given a continued economic, cultural, and technological evolution. It requires that industrial systems be viewed in concert with their surroundings, and provides a prism through which the impact of industry and technology on the environment, and associated changes in society and the economy, can be examined. It focuses on local, regional, and global use of materials, along with usage and flow of energy in products, processes, industrial sectors and economies, and highlights the potential role of industry in reducing environmental burdens throughout the product lifecycle.



DEMATERIALIZATION



Dematerialization refers to the reduction of materials used, and quantity of waste produced, in the production of a unit of economic output. It is an investigation into the critical role technology plays in increasing the efficiency of material use, along with the reduction in the release of material waste caused by ongoing production and consumption. This has particular significance for the human environment in that lower intensity of materials will limit human exposure to hazardous waste, conserve undisturbed landscapes, and reduce the amount of garbage and waste produced.



URBAN ECOLOGY



Urban ecology is the study of human-dominated ecosystems through interdisciplinary research; it integrates analytical and participatory approaches to problem solving, and engages policy makers and the public in the generation and use of scientific knowledge. Its goal of developing more sustainable, healthy cities is critical to conserving the overall environment. Livable natural cities increase the probability that sprawl can be minimized and remaining open spaces preserved. Understanding the ecology of cities is an important step towards improving the quality of life and creating more livable places for all its inhabitants.



SPECIAL EVENT: THE NATURE OF SUSTAINABILITY



Does reducing un-sustainability produce sustainability? Can sustainability be more compellingly redefined as ‘flourishing’? Will the analogies to natural eco-systems that initiated the field of industrial ecology (and that animate many of the foundations of eco-efficiency) ultimately limit our ability to achieve true sustainability by failing to include equity and economy? Can the limitations created by ecological comparison (and classic ecological theory) be overcome by replacing analogy with metaphor, and thus with more recent interpretations of ecosystems as self- organizing, hierarchical, and open systems? John Ehrenfeld, who has asked these questions – and profoundly considered their answers - will share his ideas.



Speakers:

Carl Galioto, FAIA, Partner, SOM Technical Group

Marina Alberti, Urban Ecology Research Lab, Department of Urban Design and Planning,University of Washington

Martin Bechtold, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University

David Brown, Argonne National Laboratory

John Ehrenfeld, Executive Director, International Society of Industrial Ecology

John Fernandez, School of Architecture and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Thomas Graedel, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

Reid Lifset, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

Vineet Kamat, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan

Michael D. Todd, Department of Structural Engineering, University of California, San Diego

Michael Weinstock, Emergent Technologies and Design, Architectural Association School ofArchitecture, London

Wes Wilcox, Advanced Concept Group, Trek Bicycles

Ron Witte, Princeton University, School of Architecture



This symposium is being presented by Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP as a free event to the New Yorkarchitectural community.





PAUL SELETSKY

CHAIR, AIANY TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE



DIGITAL DESIGN DIRECTOR - SOM NEW YORK

SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

14 WALL STREET

NEW YORK, NY 10005

[EMAIL PROTECTED]






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