@ Hwee-Boon
> Isn't this what I said?

i dont think so. I (and i think everyone) interpreted it as 20k limit to IP
for all users if ip is whitelisted else the limit is 150 per user.

@Bill Kocik

<< 3. Repeat step 1. Do both users now see 19,999? Or does one see 19,999
and one see 20,000?
>>

 jim renkel and sjepers have already tested this.I also verified with two
different accounts.
on http://twxlate.com
Guess what ? it is working as intended :) (20k for each user)

Srikanth




On Sat, Jul 25, 2009 at 12:25 AM, Bill Kocik <bko...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> If this is correct (and I don't think it is), then it's very different
> from what has always been my understanding. I've stated a few times on
> this list my belief that if you're going to be supporting a
> significant number of simultaneous users, whitelisting works against
> you. No one has ever challenged that assertion.
>
> This is in the rate limit documentation Abraham linked to: "Each
> whitelisted entity, whether an account or IP address, is allowed 20000
> requests per hour."
>
> It is my understanding that if your IP is whitelisted, you get one
> pool of 20,000 requests per each hour to divide up amongst all your
> users - NOT 20,000 requests for each of them. I could be wrong, but I
> don't think I am. If you have a whitelisted IP, here's an experiment
> you can run:
>
> 1. Check the current rate limit using two different Twitter accounts
> from your IP (using curl or whichever tool you choose). You should get
> the same number (probably 20,000 unless you've been making requests
> recently from that IP)
> 2. Make a request that counts against the rate limit from ONE and only
> ONE of the two accounts (grab their statuses/friends_timeline, for
> example)
> 3. Repeat step 1. Do both users now see 19,999? Or does one see 19,999
> and one see 20,000?
>
> If one user still sees 20,000, then I'm wrong, and you've got 20,000
> requests per hour per user (and I'm gonna go apply for
> whitelisting :). If they both see 19,999, then I'm right - your IP has
> a single pool of 20,000 requests from which all of your users draw.
>
>
> On Jul 24, 2:36 am, srikanth reddy <srikanth.yara...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > @jim.renkel. Thanks a ton. I think now it is clear.
> >
> > <<It appears to me that each user of a white-listed site gets 20k
> > requests per hour, independent of any other users of that site or *any
> > other uses of the twitter API at other sites by that user *>>
> >
> > probably this is what they mean by
> >
> > *"IP whitelisting takes precedence to account rate limits*. *GET requests
> > from a whitelisted IP address made on a user's behalf will be deducted
> from
> > the whitelisted IP's limit, not the users*."
> >
> > If the IP limit  is for the consumer then it will lead to denial of
> service
> > attacks.
> > This is how we wanted it to work.
> >
> > Srikanth
> >
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Jul 24, 2009 at 12:52 AM, jim.renkel <james.ren...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > > My experience with this is, I think, a little bit different than what
> > > you describe.
> >
> > > It appears to me that each user of a white-listed site gets 20k
> > > requests per hour, independent of any other users of that site or any
> > > other uses of the twitter API at other sites by that user.
> >
> > > I didn't think this was what twitter intended and reported it as a bug
> > > (See:http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/detail?id=617), but
> > > the twitter folk said "Yup, working as intended".
> >
> > > After you log in athttp://twxlate.com, the site reports rate limit
> > > information on every page view, so you can see how this works there.
> >
> > > Comments expected and welcome.
> >
> > > Jim Renkel
> >
> > > On Jul 23, 3:48 am, jmathai <jmat...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > > > In other words, you have a web app running on a single server with
> a
> > > > > single IP. You make authenticated requests using each user's
> account.
> > > > > If your IP is whitelisted, the calls go towards your 20k limit, if
> it
> > > > > is not whitelisted, it goes against the current 150 limit for the
> > > > > respective accounts. That's what it means by "IP whitelisting takes
> > > > > precedence to account rate limits".
> >
> > > > I don't believe that is true.  If your web app is running on a
> > > > whitelisted IP then you get up to 20k GET calls per hour.  POST
> > > > requests (status or DM) are counted against the user being
> > > > authenticated.  You CANNOT retrieve a user's rate limit status.
>

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