App-engine is free to a point, and you do get (little) more than you pay
for. But that scheme carries a heavy price:

personally engraved downloads: one heavyweight op per subscriber (one-time
though),
having server-side resources proxy all mobile twitter interaction: way, way
to heavy for no real functional benefit (and also less fault tolerant).

On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 1:02 PM, Abraham Williams <4bra...@gmail.com> wrote:

> With the proliferation of services like Google App Engine finding free or
> cheap sever resources is easy.
>
> Abraham
>
>
> On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 06:09, ryan alford <ryanalford...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Another problem with this approach is that you are now required to have a
>> server.  So now a developer would have the added expense of paying for a
>> server.  Now if the developer already had a server, then it's a moot point,
>> but not all developers have their own hosted servers.
>>
>> What happens when your server goes down, or your hosting provider has
>> connectivity problems?  Your app is now dead, even though Twitter is still
>> functioning normally.
>>
>> Ryan
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 7:08 AM, Anton Krasovsky <
>> anton.krasov...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> With all that talk about OAuth, I thought I might share my experience
>>> using it in for a mobile (j2me) twitter client.
>>>
>>> I guess my approach is nothing new, and probably is not applicable to
>>> iPhone apps because of the appstore distribution process, but anyways.
>>>
>>> So the way I handle OAuth is as follows:
>>>
>>> All application downloads are handled by my own server. Before
>>> allowing user to download the app I initiate OAuth authorization with
>>> Twitter and then, save user tokens along with generated unique id for
>>> a user.
>>>
>>> Once authorized, user is permitted to download the application which
>>> is tagged with that unique user id I generated earlier.
>>>
>>> Once user starts the app, it uses it's id to authenticate itself to my
>>> server.
>>>
>>> All communicatin between Twitter and user's appication is
>>> handled/proxied by the server that performs all necessary oauth
>>> signing on behalf of the user.
>>>
>>> So, this way I have all benefits of using OAuth in a mobile app.
>>>
>>> The only drawback really, is that user must visit my web site at least
>>> once to perform authorization.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Anton
>>> http://pavo.me
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Abraham Williams | Community Advocate | http://abrah.am
> Project | Out Loud | http://outloud.labs.poseurtech.com
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> Sent from Seattle, WA, United States
>

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