Yes, but not all clients support HTTPS proxy, especially mobile
clients.

On Feb 12, 1:39 pm, Harshad RJ <harshad...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Wouldn't a regular HTTPS proxy be sufficient?
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> On Fri, Feb 12, 2010 at 11:00 AM, yegle <cnye...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi all,
> > This could be a long email.
>
> > I read Raffi's post today,the original post is here:
>
> >https://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk/browse_threa...
>
> > I think the abandon of HTTP basic auth would be a disaster for all
> > Chinese twitter users.
>
> > The gov of China runs a big censorship system called GFW. Wikipedia
> > gives more information about GFW here:
> >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Shield_Project
>
> > GFW blocked many websites like facebook, twitter, youtube, plurk and
> > so on. So how does Chinese users post tweets from twitter client? We
> > uses Twitter API proxy.
>
> > A twitter API proxy is a simple script which redirect all POST and GET
> > request it received to twitter.com. These scripts are written in PHP
> > or Python, so it can be set up on virtual host outside China or on
> > GAE.
>
> > Basically, a API proxy script works as a middleman between twitter and
> > twitter client, little like man-in-the-middle attack.It's possible to
> > do this if the authentication is made in HTTP basic auth.But there is
> > no way to do the same thing with OAuth. The base string of an OAuth
> > request contains the domain of the HTTP request, so all client
> > developers modify their code if they want to suite the need of API
> > proxy.
>
> > This is really a disaster for all Chinese twitter users.
>
> --
> Harshad RJhttp://hrj.wikidot.com

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