Ok.

In that case then the easiest solution I can think of is to do
something similar to Facebook where session keys.  Right now I use the
session generated from the fb connect api to pass to the Server side
java libraries.

On Apr 28, 12:26 pm, Taylor Singletary <taylorsinglet...@twitter.com>
wrote:
> Hi MJ,
>
> The access tokens used transparently behind the scenes in @Anywhere aren't
> compatible with the OAuth 1.0A access tokens Twitter uses in the standard
> API implementation. We're looking at creative ways to bridge the gap but
> won't have an easy solution for this for a bit.
>
> Taylor Singletary
> Developer Advocate, Twitterhttp://twitter.com/episod
>
> On Wed, Apr 28, 2010 at 9:18 AM, MJ <lor...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Don't mean the credentials (password) but if a user authorizes my app
> > to for example post tweets to their account via @anywhere  will my
> > server side libraries (using JTwitter) have the same permissions
> > provided that they are using the same API Key and Secret Key?
>
> > On Apr 28, 4:06 am, glenn gillen <gl...@rubypond.com> wrote:
> > > On Apr 28, 12:06 am, MJ <lor...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > > Also I am using @anywhere to login but I also have some server side
> > > > code with java.  Is there a way that I can pass the credentials of the
> > > > @anywhere logged in user to the server side code?  Or does that happen
> > > > automatically (once someone authorizes the Twitter application via
> > > > @anywhere a server side library with the same apikey and secretkey is
> > > > authorized).
>
> > > I doubt you'll have access to the credentials, as that would mean
> > > you'd
> > > have login credentials for any twitter user that hit your page which
> > > wouldn't
> > > be what end users would expect.
> > > --
> > > Glennhttp://glenngillen.com/

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