Is this scheme available for all open source applications to test, or is TTYtter the only one using it at the moment?
--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
http://borasky-research.net http://twitter.com/znmeb

"A mathematician is a device for turning coffee into theorems." - Paul Erdos


Quoting Cameron Kaiser <spec...@floodgap.com>:

I have the same question. I need to add Twitter OAuth to my widely
distributed PHP based open-source CMS add-on. All the documentation
says never ever distribute your consumer secret, which I understand
why this would be a bad idea. Yet all of the documentation/examples I
have found require that the consumer secret be hard-coded into the
source.

The closes thing I have found, that doesn't require the consumer
secret embedded in the source, is a description of how it might work,
http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk/browse_thread/thread/c18ade9d86c8b239
But, I cannot find any docs/examples where this scenario has actually
been implemented.

It does exist. While I can't speak for Twitter and whatever internal issues
are slowing up its rollout, TTYtter has been a test bed for the key exchange
for some time now. Most of the users have found the process painless. You can
see how a sample workflow works in the documentation, or try it yourself. The
app itself is open Perl.

        http://www.floodgap.com/software/ttytter/

I'm sure Taylor will comment on what will be happening to roll it out to more
potential consumers.

--
------------------------------------ personal: http://www.cameronkaiser.com/ --
  Cameron Kaiser * Floodgap Systems * www.floodgap.com * ckai...@floodgap.com
-- People are weird. -- Law & Order SVU ---------------------------------------




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