On 9/4/10 8:51 PM, Bernd Stramm wrote:
> On Sat, 04 Sep 2010 20:34:50 +0200
> Tom van der Woerdt <i...@tvdw.eu> wrote:
> 
>> On 9/4/10 8:13 PM, Bernd Stramm wrote:
>>> On Sat, 04 Sep 2010 19:02:11 +0200
>>> Tom van der Woerdt <i...@tvdw.eu> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 9/4/10 6:08 PM, rrd wrote:
>>>>> I have a website which gets friends timeline by twitter api. I use
>>>>> oauth 1.0 My website worked without any problem in the last 1,5
>>>>> year, but from 1st September something changed.
>>>>>
>>>>> When I try to add a new user my app redirects me to the twitter
>>>>> oauth authentication page, where I could log in with my twitter
>>>>> credentials. After this twitter redirects me to my application.
>>>>>
>>>>> After this when I try to verify credentials I got "Could not
>>>>> authenticate you" error message.
>>>>>
>>>>> Could it be a timestamp problem? I found a few articles about
>>>>> having authentication problems because of fautty timestamp. If so
>>>>> what should I do if I am not able to change the server time? It
>>>>> seems I have 55 minutes difference from twitter time.
>>>>>
>>>
>>> Is it 55 minutes, or 5 minutes and the wrong time zone?
>>>
>>> In the case of 55 minutes, of course Tom is right:
>> I'd be right in both cases. ;-) Although compensating for the timezone
>> is also an option. (But really, the Unix Timestamp is always UTC,
>> right?)
> 
> The sever of the website may be configured to a timezone that is
> different from the server's timezone. And, we don't know how the
> website code determines the time stamp. 5 minutes off indicates
> something wrong with the server, but it's not unheard of.
Unix time, or POSIX time, is a system for describing points in time,
defined as the number of seconds elapsed since midnight proleptic
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) of January 1, 1970, not counting leap
seconds.

Read the UTC part ;-)

> 
>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> 55 minutes is a lot. You should contact the server owner and tell
>>>> him/her to synchronize the clock.
>>>>
>>>> If that's not an option, then you should simply generate an
>>>> "offset" by asking the Twitter server the time and comparing this
>>>> to the Unix Time of the server (don't do that too often, daily is
>>>> fine). Later you can use this offset and add it to the Unix Time
>>>> of the server to generate a time that is closer to the Twitter.com
>>>> one.
>>>>
>>>> Tom
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
> 
> 
> 

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