"We're almost always behind in processing whitelisting requests. Due
to volume, we can't respond to all requests."

Really? Is not responding at all to whitelisting requests an official
policy?  If you mean you can't respond quickly, that makes sense. If
you mean you can't approve all requests, I agree. But is no response
at all a smart, polite, or even efficient way to deal with requests
from developers? It seems like a guaranteed way to create discouraged
developers. I know you try hard to be responsive, Taylor, and the fact
that you will discuss this off-list proves this. So I'm guessing this
is a policy you are just repeating. Maybe you can go back to
management and point out the flaws in this approach?

If a decision is made to deny a whitelist request, and at least a few
minutes are spent on that decision, wouldn't it make more sense to
reply with a denial? Otherwise the developer is left to repeat the
request, which must use up more time for Twitter HQ than sending a
denial in the first place. Repeated requests with no response leaves
the developer with the opinion that Twitter doesn't want a third-party
ecosystem, which clearly isn't the case. It also fills this list with
messages from annoyed developers, which doesn't send a good message to
new developers.

Why can't someone reply with "Sorry, we can't approve this request
right now due to insufficient resources, but we appreciate your
interest in Twitter development. Please try again in the future, as we
may have more resources available at that time."  How many seconds
does it take to send this type of email?


On Wed, Oct 20, 2010 at 12:21 PM, Taylor Singletary
<taylorsinglet...@twitter.com> wrote:
> Hi Cassie,
> We're almost always behind in processing whitelisting requests. Due to
> volume, we can't respond to all requests. If the nature of your project has
> changed, you should feel free to re-apply -- even if you were already
> granted whitelisted status, as the nature of a project is certainly taken
> into account in the decision making process. Feel free to follow up with me
> privately at list with the username you've filed a whitelisting request
> under for expanded discussion.
> Thanks,
> Taylor
> On Tue, Oct 19, 2010 at 4:12 PM, Cassie Lynn <cassie.schwendi...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> Hello!
>>
>> How often should you send a request to be whitelisted? I am finding
>> that in the span of time while I'm waiting for an answer, the nature
>> of my project has changed drastically. So I then resend a request.
>> Does this affect whether you will be whitelisted or not? And should I
>> wait for a rejection before rerequesting in the future?
>>
>> Thank you,
>> - Cassie
>>
>> --
>> Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
>> API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
>> Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
>> http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
>> Change your membership to this group:
>> http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk
>
> --
> Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
> API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
> Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
> http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
> Change your membership to this group:
> http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk
>



-- 
Adam Green
Twitter API Consultant and Trainer
http://140dev.com
@140dev

-- 
Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
Issues/Enhancements Tracker: http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
Change your membership to this group: 
http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk

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