I never thought that amateur radio would be discussed in a video blogger group, 
but it's 
great to hear how it all goes hand in hand. I know any ham radio operator would 
freak out 
if they are ever compared to cb radio operators, so I have to laugh at that. 
I've been a ham 
(radio operator) for a couple years now because it runs in the family, but I 
always fear that 
it's a dying bread, so it's nice to hear younger, digital orientated, people 
still interested in 
it too!

73s KC9FNR

Kev!



>
> Hehe yeah.  I still really like Shortwave, but rarely find time for it
> now. If I had to fit Ham Radio into the analogy I'd liken them to
> mainstream media.  It's licensed, controlled, and regulated ... where
> as things like VoIP (largely) isn't.
> 
> 73s de N9LTQ
> 
> :-P
> 
> On 11/21/05, Eric Rice <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> > I love how ham radio gets brought into the mix. Two of us on our show are 
> > amateur 
radio
> > operators, licensed and the whole nine, as are most of my friends. It's the 
> > most 
bizarre
> > analogy I've ever seen yet.
> >
> > Unless we need licenses to blog? ;-)
> >
> > ER
> >
> >
> > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, David Meade <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> > >
> > > well I'm not sure how Ham Radio got into the mix (its different than CB) 
> > > ...
> > > but as a Federally Licensed Short Wave Radio Operator (HAM Radio) I'll 
> > > chime
> > > in ... :-)
> > >
> > > Let me first speak to the slightly OT part: Yeah HAM operators have been
> > > operating a network of computers over short wave for ... well a long long
> > > long long long time. Ham Radio has always been an interesting (and at 
> > > times
> > > vital) component in emergency/disaster communications.
> > >
> > > ok .. now back to the topic (I think).
> > >
> > > I've kinda thought of it this way in my head: VoIP is to Ham Radio as
> > > Vlogging is to TV.
> > >
> > > VoIP let people freely find/communicate with people all over the world
> > > without the entry barrier (license) or technical knowledge (Radio
> > > operation/code/etc) that things like Ham Radio have.
> > >
> > > One of the coolest things that brought young people into the hobby of Ham
> > > Radio was the wonder of sitting town and being able to have a random
> > > conversation and share ideas with people all over the world. It was great.
> > > It required a license and to learn Morse code, and to know how radio 
> > > signals
> > > worked, and how to tune an antenna for the right band, and all sorts of
> > > things ... but it was great.
> > >
> > > Today ... you can do that with Yahoo Messenger. :-P
> > >
> > > The other amazing thing you could do with HAM Radio was stay in contact
> > > anywhere ... even in your car. HAMs would set up auto-patches to route
> > > Shortwave to/from land line telephones ... WHOA!
> > >
> > > Today ... we all have cell phones. :-P
> > >
> > > Understandably HAMs were somewhat concerned that their already dwindling
> > > numbers might drop off all together as this new distributed and 
> > > unregulated
> > > communication medium found its place in homes all over the world. Sure 
> > > there
> > > was alot of noise on this 'Internet' but the shear ease of use 
> > > (comparably)
> > > was hard to ignore.
> > >
> > > Mainstream media is no doubt similarly concerned that their revenue models
> > > and programming formats are going to be serious problems as a new and
> > > engaging form of on-demand entertainment is insisted upon by more and more
> > > of the world.
> > >
> > > Ham Radio Operators eventually learned that things were going to change, 
> > > but
> > > nobody was likely to go extinct. Ham Radio license requirements have
> > > changes, preferred operating methods, bandwidth has been reallocated - but
> > > HAMs are still around. Hams still use auto-patch at times (even though 
> > > they
> > > have a cell phone). Hams still spend hours hunting for the perfect
> > > long-range signal (even though they could just open up an international 
> > > VoIP
> > > chat room).
> > >
> > > The same will happen with media I think.
> > >
> > > Some vloggers will move more mainstream. Some mainstream will move to be
> > > more vloggish. Vloggers will have to deal with more and more show-like 
> > > vlogs
> > > (and the expectation that will set in new potential viewers). Mainstream
> > > media will have to deal with the fact that people can get unfiltered news
> > > and entertainment on demand (and the expectation that will set in their
> > > viewers).
> > >
> > > People willing to look through a bit of noise will use VoIP/Vlogging
> > > scenario... the rest will find comfort in the more controlled
> > > HAM/Mainstream-Media scenario :-)
> > >
> > > Sure there's noise in our channel ... but it wont prevent the change that 
> > > is
> > > bound to come.
> > >
> > > ... I think I found the point there?? ...
> > >
> > > - Dave
> > >
> > > --
> > > http://www.DavidMeade.com
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> 
> 
> --
> http://www.DavidMeade.com
>







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