I became numb reading the comic.........it was very good stuff and 
it really does highlight what is wrong with the current copyright 
situation......$10,000 for a 4 1/2 second clip of the Simpson's 
playing in the background in a documentary.......that is just 
freakin stupid.........I am left speechless, I really am..

Heath - Batman Geek
http://batmangeek7.blogspot.com


--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Andy Carvin <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> 
wrote:
>
> Hi everyone,
> 
> Sorry if this has been posted already (man, it's hard to keep up 
with 
> you guys), but I just wanted to post a note about a must-read 
comic book 
> on copyright and fair use.
> 
> The Center for the Study of the Public Domain, in an effort to 
educate 
> content producers about the realities of copyright, have published 
an 
> amazing comic book called "Tales from the Public Domain: Bound by 
Law?" 
> (http://www.law.duke.edu/cspd/comics/) The comic book, available 
in 
> various digital formats as well as on paper, is an entertaining, 
highly 
> informative about the often-confusing world of copyright law.
> 
> The book follows the story of a documentary maker putting together 
a 
> film about life in New York City. ("Trapped by a STRUGGLE she 
didn't 
> understand.... By day a FILM MAKER... By night she fought for FAIR 
> USE!") As she's gone around and captured scenes for her film, 
she's also 
> picked up incidental uses of other people's work - a saxophonist 
playing 
> a song, a sign in the background with a company logo, public TV 
screens 
> showing images of Bart Simpson. These scenes are a reality of 
modern 
> life, yet they're a nightmare for documentary producers. As the 
comic 
> book notes, one producer was forced to remove footage that 
featured 
> someone whose mobile phone ringtone happened to be the theme to 
the 
> movie Rocky because they couldn't afford to pay the song's 
publisher 
> $10,000 for including it. In other cases, important works like the 
civil 
> rights documentary Eyes on the Prize get locked away for years 
because 
> the producers couldn't afford to pay for the clearance rights of 
> incidental music. (Thankfully, Eyes on the Prize will finally air 
again 
> on PBS this fall, after years of fundraising to pay for clearance 
fees.)
> 
> The question is, who's in the right? When does the incorporation 
of 
> someone else's creative work into a new work constitute fair use, 
and 
> when does it cross the line?
> 
> Page after page, the comic goes through examples of producers 
who've 
> found themselves in difficult circumstances because they allowed 
> themselves to get pushed around by big-media lawyers - even when 
their 
> use of someone else's content is justifiably fair use. It's 
intended to 
> give producers confidence when it comes to using someone's content 
in a 
> fair use context, explaining when the law is on their side and 
when it 
> isn't.
> 
> Read more here:
> 
> http://www.andycarvin.com/
> permalink:
> 
http://www.andycarvin.com/archives/2006/03/fighting_copyright_i.html
> 
> -- 
> ------------------------------
> Andy Carvin
> acarvin (at) edc . org
> andycarvin (at) yahoo . com
> 
> http://www.digitaldivide.net
> http://www.andycarvin.com
> ------------------------------
>






 
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