Yeah I cant keep up anymore either. I only noticed these because they
were on the front page of the UK bbc news site. Just noticed that
theres also a news story about viral video audiences, some research
company reckons the 'star wars kid' video has been watched 900 million
times. But then it turns out that this 'news' is timed to co-incide
with the launch of some new UK TV program about viral videos.
Meanwhile the BBC are going on about the future of TV a lot because
they consider themselves the guardians of it in the UK, and as their
funding comes from the license fee they are always a bit concious of
the need to keep talking about themselves and the future.

Heres the article about the viral vids:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6187554.stm                 
                                       

The Star Wars Kid still wishes the video wasnt out there, the BBC and
others dont care, theyve been showing it on the TV today, all these
years later. At least the man behind '2nd most watched viral video'
Numa Numa, although upset when the thing first happened to him, has
come to terms with the attention.

Anyway I remain quite skeptical about the accuracy of such viewing
figures.

Steve Elbows

--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
>
> Thanks for sharing steve!
> 
> Interesting articles.
> 
> I use google news to keep tabs on articles mentioning vlogs in the
> mainstream press, but it's to much to keep up with anymore. I keep
> missing the good stuff.
> 
> -Mike
> mefeedia.com
> mmeiser.com/blog/
> 
> On 11/27/06, Steve Watkins <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> > The BBC seem to be doing a series of articles on the future of TV.
> > Some of it covers vlogging, although a lot is about how traditional
> > television will adapt or die.
> >
> > Online video eroding TV viewing:
> > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6168950.stm
> >
> > At the very end it says "The first award ceremony for web-only video,
> > the Vloggies, was held in San Francisco at the start of November.
> >
> > Alive in Baghdad, a site featuring videos of real Iraqis telling their
> > own stories, won the top award. "
> >
> >
> > How Will we Watch TV in 10 Years?
> > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6146244.stm
> >
> > Including some quotes from traditional media types which will may be
> > considered nonsense by some herehere.
> >
> >
> > The First Superstars of Web TV
> > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6180312.stm
> >
> > Includes interviews with 2 online video makers.
> >
> >
> > What To Watch on the Web
> > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/6178644.stm
> >
> > Lots of stuff about traditional TV and news video on the web, but
> > towards the end of the page it has sections on web-only comedy and
> > videoblogs.
> >
> > The comedy section mentions Galacticast in glowing terms:
> >
> > "Galacticast, a weekly sci-fi comedy shot in a Montreal apartment, is
> > one of the few with enough talent and imagination to be truly funny
> > and watchable."
> >
> > Congats for the glowing BBC review & link Galacticast! Recognition,
> > hoorah. There are many other comedic talents on the web which I reckon
> > also deserve praise, but hey ho, its a start :) Just wish these
> > journo's could resist being so negative, even the compliments are a
> > dig at the quality of others! Goodnight Burbank is mentioned by the
> > Beeb too, a programme I only found myself a few weeks ago and did seem
> > rather funny to me :)
> >
> > Anyway Im sure theres a few things in these articles that people could
> > tear apart. My summary is that theyve decided that web video has come
> > of age, but with plenty of caveats and the usual 'missing the point'
> > slightly (eg huge success by online video makers is still deemed 'a
> > surprise').
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Steve Elbows
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
> >
>


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