Wouldn't the fact that both countries are signatories to Berne make it 
protected in the US regardless of whether or not it was registered here in the 
70s?

mb

Michael Brewer
Team Leader for Instructional Services
University of Arizona Libraries
brew...@u.library.arizona.edu<mailto:brew...@u.library.arizona.edu>

From: videolib-boun...@lists.berkeley.edu 
[mailto:videolib-boun...@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Jessica Rosner
Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 9:19 AM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Copyright "waived" on Bolivian film?

OK BUY not by his story.
FYI my money is on the film never being registered in the US.
On Mon, Apr 4, 2011 at 12:12 PM, Jessica Rosner 
<jessicapros...@gmail.com<mailto:jessicapros...@gmail.com>> wrote:
I don't exactly by this story that he mailed it out and waived the copyright. 
First off he would have to own the copyright to waive it, most directors don't 
own their films. Kind of like when Michael Moore said he thought people should 
just illegally download SICKO which did not endear him to the Weinsteins. It is 
possible the director owned the copyright, but not that likely on a fiction 
film. IMDB shows the film had some kind of theatrical release in 1973 by a 
mostly exploitation company called Tricontinental Film Center. Presumably 
somebody sold them the rights. The key really is if Tricontinental ever 
bothered to copyright it in the US.You should be able to check this at Library 
of Congress. Now even if they did not in theory it could be retroactively 
copyrighted by the original rights holder, but until they do it would be fair 
game. Basically I would see if it was ever copyrighted in the US and proceed 
from there.

On Mon, Apr 4, 2011 at 11:48 AM, Brewer, Michael 
<brew...@u.library.arizona.edu<mailto:brew...@u.library.arizona.edu>> wrote:
Anyone know about this? A faculty member is asking us to stream this film for 
his course and says that the copyright was "waived" by the director at the time 
of its distribution.  We don't even own a copy:

"The film is titled  'Yawar mallku Sangre del condor = Blood of the condor', 
directed by Jorge Sanjinés in 1969. The copyright has been waived on this 
title. Sanjines mailed out the film in order to save it from the destruction by 
the Bolivian government. I believe that if you request an ILL, you will see 
that the borrowed dvd has no copyright claim. That is why there is no vendor. 
Something you might check out for this very important piece of cinema."

Thanks,

mb

Michael Brewer
Team Leader for Instructional Services
University of Arizona Libraries, A122
P.O. Box 210055
Tucson, AZ  85721-0055
Tel: (520) 307-2771<tel:%28520%29%20307-2771>
Fax: (520) 626-7444<tel:%28520%29%20626-7444>
brew...@u.library.arizona.edu<mailto:brew...@u.library.arizona.edu>


VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues 
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, 
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and 
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective 
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication 
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and 
distributors.



--
Jessica Rosner
Media Consultant
224-545-3897<tel:224-545-3897> (cell)
212-627-1785<tel:212-627-1785> (land line)
jessicapros...@gmail.com<mailto:jessicapros...@gmail.com>



--
Jessica Rosner
Media Consultant
224-545-3897 (cell)
212-627-1785 (land line)
jessicapros...@gmail.com<mailto:jessicapros...@gmail.com>
VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues 
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, 
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and 
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective 
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication 
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and 
distributors.

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