Video Lib Friends,

Please direct me to a good source or give me some information on this.  We have 
the VHS version of "Eyes on the Prize II."  From what we can determine thus 
far, there is no DVD version of this particular title.  Apparently licensing 
issues have kept "Eyes on the Prize II" from being translated into DVD.  Eyes 
on the Prize I was translated into DVD in 2006 and is available for purchase 
from DVD.

So, since this is not available in DVD... and since our VHS tapes are starting 
to show wear, I "thought" that it might be a legal candidate for converting a 
copy to DVD for our faculty to use. ...especially since our IT department is 
pulling all VHS players and equipment out of our classrooms.  They will no 
longer support this format.

Our tech services librarian head says that his is NOT the case and quotes 
"copyright expert" Lolly Gasaway as saying, " .

"There is no permission for libraries to convert format as long as the 
equipment for using VHS is still being manufactured or is still reasonably 
available." (This quote comes from her book, Copyright Questions and Answers 
for Information Professionals in press from Purdue University Press, due out in 
November).

So, does anyone out there have any insights into this?  If this title is never 
converted to DVD, may we not make an archival copy until literally our last VHS 
machine dies?

Thanks for the input.



Jared Alexander Seay
Reference Librarian
Head, Media Collections
Addlestone Library
College of Charleston
Charleston SC 29424

Main Office:           843-953-1428       
blogs.cofc.edu/seayj/<http://blogs.cofc.edu/seayj/>
Media Collections: 843-953-8040       blogs.cofc.edu/media 
collections<http://blogs.cofc.edu/mediacollections/>

Addlestone Report:    
blogs.cofc.edu/addlestonereport<http://blogs.cofc.edu/addlestonereport/>
Reference Services:  blogs.cofc.edu/refblog<http://blogs.cofc.edu/refblog/>






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