The author recommends that in order to survive, libraries have to redefine 
their relationships with You Tube and other online video sources. But the 
problem is accessing most of these resources are illegal if one has to follow 
the copyright law. Since I act as our library's copyright advisor, besides 
being the AV librarian, I found myself trapped in what I'm teaching about 
copyright and what the faculty want to use in their classes that are all almost 
illegal.
Farhad Moshiri, MLS
Audiovisual  Librarian
University of the Incarnate Word Library
4301 Broadway – CPO 297
San Antonio, TX 78209
(210) 829-3842
________________________________
From: videolib-boun...@lists.berkeley.edu <videolib-boun...@lists.berkeley.edu> 
on behalf of Maureen Tripp <maureen_tr...@emerson.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2016 9:46 AM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Jane Otto's C&RL article.

Scott, thanks for suggesting this article, “University Faculty Describe Their 
Use of Moving Images in Teaching and Learning . . . “.
It made me think that, apart from my regular and active clients, I don’t know 
very much about faculty actually use moving images in their teaching. I would 
be interested in your faculty survey results, as well.
Did anyone else who read the article find her last paragraph disturbing?

“The largest issue, however, may be that faculty video users appear to be 
falling away. If libraries are to survive as players in this arena, they will 
have to redefine themselves. They must reexamine their relationship to YouTube 
and other online video sources. Are there ways in which libraries can 
facilitate access to the heavily used resources they don’t own, and never will? 
Will they choose to compete with online providers or identify new services to 
complement those of the Internet video sites? Libraries should stake out their 
territory, marshal their resources, focus their efforts, and get the word out.”

Anyone have any ideas on specific ways we can go about staking, marshalling, 
focusing, etc?
Maureen

From: videolib-boun...@lists.berkeley.edu 
[mailto:videolib-boun...@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Deborah S Benrubi
Sent: Monday, August 01, 2016 4:37 PM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Surveys for Users of Library Video Collections?

Scott, thanks for sharing your survey. I'd be interested in the results of the 
survey with your faculty, especially in their comments if any.

Debbie
--
Deborah Benrubi
Technical Services Librarian
University of San Francisco
Gleeson Library|Geschke Center
2130 Fulton St.
San Francisco, CA 94117

ph 415.422.5672   fax 415.422.2233
On 8/1/2016 1:14 PM, scott spicer wrote:
Hi Meghan,
I concur with deg that we need more data on specific user experiences with 
library based commercial video collections. IMHO Jane Otto's 2014 C&RL article 
on the topic is a decent reference point (includes survey and qualitative focus 
group methodologies):
Otto, J. J. (2014). University Faculty Describe Their Use of Moving Images in 
Teaching and Learning and Their Perceptions of the Library’s Role in That Use. 
College & Research Libraries, 75(2), 115-144.

Similarly, in Spring '15 to capture some case studies as part of a streaming 
task group initiative, I sent out a survey to known instructor users of our 
licensed streaming video content asking about specific pedagogical use cases, 
content value, streaming affordances, and technical experience with these 
materials.  I am not certain if it would be helpful for your question, but feel 
free to take a look at a public copy I made of this survey: 
http://z.umn.edu/publicvideousesurvey.  Further, I would be happy to share some 
of the general results if anyone is interested.

Best,
Scott

--
Scott Spicer
Media Outreach and Learning Spaces Librarian
University of Minnesota Libraries - Twin Cities
341 Walter Library
spic0...@umn.edu<mailto:spic0...@umn.edu>    612.626.0629
Media Services: lib.umn.edu/media<http://lib.umn.edu/media>
SMART Learning Commons: lib.umn.edu/smart<http://lib.umn.edu/smart>




VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues 
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, 
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and 
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective 
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication 
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and 
distributors.


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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues 
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, 
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and 
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective 
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication 
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and 
distributors.

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