>There is also now the "Pinturicchio" lion's head viola at the end of your
>page: the interresting thing with that instrument - apart from its long
>string length! - is that it has been ordered and painted for Pope
>Borgia'appartments in Roma. This Pope was Archbishop of Valencia, Spain,
>before he moved to Italy, where he came with his complete "maison" (I don't
>know the word in english). Valencia is considered to be the place of birth
>for the vihuela, probably as a development of arabic instruments of the
>rebab type. Several names of cities and villages of the coast of Valencia
>still has arabic resonances today, the most famous beeing Benicasim.
>Concerning the Valencian origins of the vihuela, see the "incontournable"
>Early History of the Viol by Ian Woodfield.
>So do I consider the model of Pinturrichio as an interresting vihuela-viola,
>as the vogue of the viola in Italy was in part imported from Valencia by the
>Borgia.
>Philippe 
>
>
>  
>
I've seen this instrument described as a 'vihuela de penola' (not viola 
da penola) on another website:

http://www.renesenn.de/

Then go to Alte Gitarren & Lautenmsusik and then 'vihuela'.

(It's also described as a 'guitarre morisca' here too. A bit too 
speculative, perhaps.)

There is another 'vihuela de penola' ,evidently from Valencia, from the 
late 15th century here 
<http://homepage.ntlworld.com/s.walsh/val/Valencia.html>


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