In a universe where all points must be connected, a pair is a topological
requirement. In a system where all endpoints must be connected then every
connection must have at least two endpoints.

At the beginning of the big bang, Computational complexity was at its
minimum and quantum entanglement was at its maximum. The entire universe
was completely entangled, it was a bose condensate. This was the time when
all the forces were combined in a grand unification to operated as a single
force. As the universe expanded and cooled, entanglement decreased and
Computational complexity increased. The four fundamental forces began to
diverge and the running coupling constants of those fundamental forces also
began to diverge.




When spacetime returns to the entangled state that the universe was
initially in, the fundamental forces return to the way that they were at
the beginning of the big bang and the single global fundamental force is
reestablished.


In this restored state of spacetime simplicity, the LENR reaction is
manifest.

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 2:38 AM, MarkI-ZeroPoint <zeropo...@charter.net>
wrote:

> That doesn’t answer my question… it’s just regurgitating the
> particle/antiparticle jargon.
>
> -mark
>
>
>
> *From:* Axil Axil [mailto:janap...@gmail.com]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, August 30, 2017 10:41 AM
> *To:* vortex-l
> *Subject:* Re: [Vo]:Why pairs?
>
>
>
> The latest theory is that entanglement keeps spacetime together.
> Entanglement is fundamental.  All other aspects of spacetime come from
> entanglement. In order for entanglement to exist, two things must be
> entangled. When a particle is created, it must be paired with an
> antiparticle so that a connection between them is formed...entanglement
> must be created.  All particle pairs must be connected by a wormhole. The
> wormhole is the mechanism that keeps spacetime together.
>
>
>
> We can manipulate the forces of nature, weak, strong, EMF, gravity by
> using entanglement, since those "fundamental" forces come from(aka emerge)
> entanglement and all the properties of spacetime emerge from entanglement.
>
>
>
> This idea has just come to Leonard Susskind and is explained here:
>
>
> Dear Qubitzers, GR=QM
>
> Leonard Susskind
> <https://arxiv.org/find/hep-th/1/au:+Susskind_L/0/1/0/all/0/1>
>
> *(Submitted on 10 Aug 2017)*
>
>
>
> https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.03040
>
>
>
> Also, here is how wormholes work
>
>
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnbJEg9r1o8
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 30, 2017 at 3:12 AM, MarkI-ZeroPoint <zeropo...@charter.net>
> wrote:
>
> Vorts,
>
>
>
> Perusing some physics news, and thought you’d b interested in this:
>
>
>
> http://www.express.co.uk/news/science/841935/Why-is-there-a-
> universe-quarks-quantum-physics-big-bang-nothing-god
>
>
>
> Some excerpts:
>
> The new findings seem to break the classical physics law of the
> Conservation of Energy – that energy can neither be created nor destroyed –
> showing that new energy can appear within a closed system from nowhere.
>
>
>
> These Quantum physicists first theorised, then proved, that particles
> simply pop into existence, usually in pairs, from absolutely nowhere.
>
>
>
> Nobel prize winner Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of
> Technology, who specialises is quantum chromodynamics, the theory that
> describes how quarks behave deep within atomic nuclei, has found that the
> universe simply doesn’t like a state of nothingness.
>
>
>
> -mark iverson
>
>
>
>
>

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