quote <<​Imagine playing a game of billiards, putting a bit of
counter-clockwise spin on the cue ball and watching it deflect to the right
as it strikes its target ball. With luck, or skill, the target ball sinks
into the corner pocket while the rightward-deflected cue ball narrowly
misses a side-pocket scratch. Now imagine your counter-clockwise spinning
cue ball striking a bowling ball instead, and deflecting even more
strongly—but to the *left*—when it strikes the larger mass.>>

This reminds me of the motion of a curling stone which  displays an
unexpected to tendency to drift in the same direction as it spins as it
slides across the ice surface. Why curling stones curl in this fashion
remains controversial.

Harry

On Mon, Jan 8, 2018 at 11:12 PM, MarkI-ZeroPoint <zeropo...@charter.net>
wrote:

> Gee, physicists don’t know everything there is to know about atomic
> physics... could it be that the ‘Standard Model’ is missing a few parts!
>
>
>
> https://phys.org/news/2018-01-result-scientists.html
>
>
>
> "What we observed was totally amazing," said Brookhaven physicist
> Alexander Bazilevsky, a deputy spokesperson for the PHENIX collaboration at
> RHIC, which is reporting these results in a new paper just published in 
> *Physical
> Review Letters*. "Our findings may mean that the mechanisms producing
> particles along the direction in which the spinning proton is traveling may
> be very different in proton-proton collisions
> <https://phys.org/tags/proton-proton+collisions/> compared with
> proton-nucleus collisions."
>
>
>
> Understanding different particle production mechanisms could have big
> implications for interpreting other high-energy particle collisions,
> including the interactions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays with particles
> in the Earth's atmosphere, Bazilevsky said.
>
>
> -Mark Iverson
>
>
>

Reply via email to