Neutral particle flux probably won't create substantial electromagnetic
noise and certainly no gamma.  Best case is that it would occasionally
knock off some electrons that would excite the characteristic x-ray
emission of their host atom.  They will excite acoustic noise that would
quickly be converted to heat.

On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 4:45 PM, Axil Axil <janap...@gmail.com> wrote:

> According to Holmlid, there is a high flux of neutral atomic fragments
> that receive a ton of kinetic energy from the primary reaction(nucleon
> particle decay). These fragments would dissipate their kinetic energy
> through particle collision cascades. That particle collision cascade
> would produce the pink noise.
>
> On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 6:33 PM, Bob Higgins <rj.bob.higg...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Keep in mind that as large massive charged particles (200x that of an
>> electron), muons would not penetrate materials very well.  For a given
>> energy, they are moving much slower than electrons.  Also, because they are
>> so heavy, they will stop slowly, and hence, not create much bremsstrahlung
>> radiation.
>>
>> On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 1:11 PM, JonesBeene <jone...@pacbell.net> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> BTW - Wouldn’t it be a hoot if muons showed up on a particular detector
>>> as 1/f^2 noise  ??
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Nigel,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Since you noticed the fit initially, were you looking for it based on
>>> phenomena from another field ?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I see from Alan’s posting that the context is no mystery – except to
>>> someone who was not paying attention to every detail of an excellent
>>> presentation <g>
>>>
>>> However, I think Nigel is looking for deeper significance. Universal
>>> theories of pink noise are incomplete. According to Wiki,  the Tweedie
>>> hypothesis has been proposed to explain the genesis of pink noise on the
>>> basis of a mathematical convergence theorem related to statistical analysis
>>> in many systems, yet … this signal  is not pink noise per se. In general
>>> the spectrum of pink noise is 1/f  for what are said to be
>>> one-dimensional signals.
>>>
>>> Perhaps two-dimensional signals have a weaker power spectrum which is
>>> the reciprocal of f^2 ? At any rate, pink noise would be an obvious place
>>> to start a search for statistical significance.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>

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