Hey Pierre-Yves,

I have to admit it was new experience to me too, to have to resort to the
source & javadocs for examples and framework alike, but now that I am used
to it (and have attached source & apidocs to my Eclipse wicket user library
;-) I don't think it's that bad.
I rather prefer it to having to struggle through for instance Tapestry in
Action* over and over again.

Cheers,

Wilko

*) I hope Wicket in Action will turn out to be a bit more functional btw


Pierre-Yves Saumont wrote:
> 
> I will also by the book as soon as it is available... unless I give up 
> before :-(
> 
> Pierre-Yves
> 
> James Cook a écrit :
>> I wouldn't be too quick to judge developers that struggle with your 
>> platform to be new to _good_ java programming. I have many years of 
>> Swing development experience and web experience dating back to the 
>> pre-servlet, pre-framework era. That said, Wicket does interest me 
>> because it is radically different that the page-based frameworks *and* 
>> JSF-based component frameworks available today.
>> 
>>  From my own experience, I would say the hardest part about _using_ 
>> Wicket is _learning_ Wicket. There is a hodgepodge of documentation 
>> scattered in a lot of different places. You are transitioning to a new 
>> version, and without a good collection of documents/best practices it 
>> seems a bit hopeless at times.
>> 
>> Your Wicket in Action book is many months off. Hopefully it is geared 
>> for Wicket 2.0. Also, perhaps you can get Manning to release it in their 
>> early access program. I know I would buy it today if a few initial 
>> chapters were available online.
>> 
>> -- jim
>> 
>> On 8/6/06, *Eelco Hillenius* <[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
>> <mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]>> wrote:
>> 
>>     I'd like to add to that that Wicket requires you to know your Java,
>>     while e.g. using JSP allows to build whole web sites with hardly any
>>     Java knowledge. Whether that is a good thing or not is debatable.
>> 
>>     Eelco
>> 
>> 
>>     On 8/6/06, Eelco Hillenius <[EMAIL PROTECTED]
>>     <mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]>> wrote:
>>      > What were/ are the problems you are experiencing Pierre-Yves?
>>      >
>>      > Usually the largest obstacle for people with Wicket (and Tapestry,
>>      > Echo and GWT for that matter) is getting rid of the bad practices
>>     they
>>      > got used to when working with frameworks like Struts etc. A lot of
>>      > people learned programming Java web apps on frameworks like that,
>>     and
>>      > never got much of the OO part. Otoh, if you're coming from e.g.
>> Swing
>>      > programming, Wicket should be easier for you.
>>      >
>>      > Wicket vs Stripes... it's oranges and pears - except for the fact
>>     that
>>      > you both make web apps with them. Stripes is geared towards
>>      > simplifying the common model 2 paradigm, and it does a very good
>> job
>>      > at that as far as I've seen, While Wicket is all about stateful,
>> self
>>      > contained, reusable components.
>>      >
>>      > Personally, I don't think Stripes is always easier than Wicket,
>>      > especially when you look at e.g.
>>      >
>>    
>> http://mc4j.org/confluence/display/stripes/Binding+directly+to+your+domain+model
>>      > ; Wicket's equivalent would be quite a lot easier imo, but for
>> some
>>      > things Stripes probably is easier, like when you are prototyping/
>>      > moving your HTML structure around a lot.
>>      >
>>      > In the end, just choose which framework that gives you a warm and
>>      > fuzzy feeling :) Stripes seems to be the best choice if you want
>>     to go
>>      > for a model 2 framework.
>>      >
>>      > Read some more here:
>>      > http://www.virtuas.com/articles/webframework-sweetspots.html
>>      >
>>      > Eelco
>>      >
>>      >
>>      >
>>      > On 8/6/06, Pierre-Yves Saumont <[EMAIL PROTECTED]
>>     <mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]>> wrote:
>>      > > I would be very interested to know how you compare Wicket and
>>     Stripes
>>      > > and why you're leaning toward Wicket. (I didn't know about
>>     Stripes, but
>>      > > at first glance, it seems much simpler than Wicket, which I
>>     have been
>>      > > struggling with for two weeks now without much success!).
>>      > >
>>      > > Pierre-Yves
>>      > >
>>      > > Bill Bruyn a écrit :
>>      > > > I have an opportunity to use a new framework on a current
>>     project, and
>>      > > > I've been trying to decide between Wicket and Stripes.  Both
>>     look really
>>      > > > nice, but at the moment I'm leaning toward Wicket.  Got a
>>     skeleton
>>      > > > project set up with 1.2.1 (via Wicket Bench 0.3.0) and am
>>     running it
>>      > > > with a JettyLauncher from Eclipse.  So far, so good, but my
>>     wicket page
>>      > > > markup (e.g., SomePage.html ) doesn't find my css.
>>      > > >
>>      > > > I've tried it at the root of my webapp and in the same
>>     directory as the
>>      > > > markup (looks like from the examples I should just be able to
>>     drop it on
>>      > > > the root).  I've tried adding a resource to the class via
>>      > > > super.getResourceSettings().addResourceFolder (though I
>>     shouldn't need
>>      > > > that, right?) and nothing seems to work.  I'm sure this is
>>     trivial, and
>>      > > > it's a bit of a disappointment that I've already had to ask
>>     for help,
>>      > > > but I've done some googling, and some browsing of the Wiki
>>     and the FAQ
>>      > > > to no avail.
>>      > > >
>>      > > > BTW, I should also mention that when I request non-existent
>>     resources
>>      > > > from the app (e.g., foo.html) I am always redirected to the
>> app's
>>      > > > homepage instead of getting a 404.  Is that the desired
>>     behavior?  Is it
>>      > > > configurable?
>>      > > >
>>      > > >
>>      > > > Thanks very much in advance,
>>      > > >
>>      > > > Bill
>>      > > >
> 
-- 
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