I aggree with JP Béland: the computer security obviously affects the Wikimedia users, but imho we shouldn’t do more than we can and let the responsability of their own security to the users -- although we should contribute for a decent security.

For the specific topic you brought about 0-days, I’m not personnaly surprised, this type of market was revealed some time ago, see for instance <http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2012/03/23/shopping-for-zero-days-an-price-list-for-hackers-secret-software-exploits/>.

~ Seb35


Le Tue, 20 Aug 2013 07:30:09 +0200, JP Béland <lebo.bel...@gmail.com> a écrit:
I'm not sure what is your point here. How exactly readers of Wikimedia
projects are at risk here because of that story? Are you trying to say it
is the Foundation responsibility to protect the readers from the
vulnerabilities of their operating systems?

JP Béland



2013/8/19 James Salsman <jsals...@gmail.com>

While the trickling release of Edward Snowden's revelations from bad to
worse in weekly incremental steps has been enormously effective in swaying
public opinion, it has made formulating a meaningful response very
difficult.

A few weeks ago we learned that the FBI has been purchasing personal
computer operating system vulnerabilities from gray and black-hat hackers on the black market, often for several tens of thousands of dollars each,
and leaving them unreported and thereby unpatched for use in future
surveillance operations:
http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2013/08/01/how-the-fbi-hacks-criminal-suspects/

Unfortunately, this means that the vulnerabilities remain available to the
criminal computer crime underground, affecting everyone including
Foundation project readers and contributors alike.

Very recently a well respected group of researchers characterized this
state of affairs as "preferable" to the complexity of additional
surveillance network and systems infrastructure:
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2312107

This is a false dichotomy which directly places Foundation project readers
and editors at risk, but does so along with virtually everyone else who
uses personal computer or smartphone equipment. However, I think it is an important aspect to address because none of the other recent eavesdropping revelations put people at risk to organized computer crime, blackmail, and
extortion in the same way.

Is there any reason to exclude action on a particular issue just because it
effects everyone else along with our users?
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