interesting. i read 90% male, 85% between 16 and 30 years of age, 12
mio players a day, 1 bio hours played a month (2012). they had a
tribunal which is switched off since a year. the market is 54 mio usd
a month for multiplayer online battle arena (moba) in the united
states. league of legends earns 120 mio usd per month, out of a
monthly player base of over 60 mio, which is 3 times more player than
dota2, and 6 times more income than dota2 (beginning of 2015).

* 
http://www.ign.com/articles/2012/10/15/riot-games-releases-awesome-league-of-legends-infographic
* 
http://www.kitguru.net/gaming/development/jon-martindale/league-of-legends-tribunal-to-return-soon/
* 
http://www.polygon.com/2014/5/27/5723446/women-in-esports-professional-gaming-riot-games-blizzard-starcraft-lol
* 
http://venturebeat.com/2015/03/24/dota-2-makes-18m-per-month-for-valve-but-league-of-legends-makes-that-much-every-5-days/


On Sat, Nov 14, 2015 at 8:25 AM, Ryan Kaldari <rkald...@wikimedia.org> wrote:
> I was skeptical of even reading this article, but it actually seems pretty
> insightful. It also seems more relevant to Wikipedia than I was expecting:
> "The answer had to be community-wide reform of cultural norms. We had to
> change how people thought about online society and change their
> expectations of what was acceptable.... How do you introduce structure and
> governance into a society that didn’t have one before?"
>
> It has some interesting ideas about using science to change the social
> dynamics of online communities and leveraging the work of academics who
> want to work on these problems. Some of the techniques they used remind me
> of Aaron's revision scoring. I wonder if there's any chance we could talk
> with them or some of their researchers.
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 13, 2015 at 3:12 PM, Denny Vrandečić <vrande...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Very interesting read (via Brandon Harris):
>>
>>
>> http://recode.net/2015/07/07/doing-something-about-the-impossible-problem-of-abuse-in-online-games/
>>
>> "the vast majority of negative behavior ... did not originate from the
>> persistently negative online citizens; in fact, 87 percent of online
>> toxicity came from the neutral and positive citizens just having a bad day
>> here or there."
>>
>> "... incidences of homophobia, sexism and racism ... have fallen to a
>> combined 2 percent of all games. Verbal abuse has dropped by more than 40
>> percent, and 91.6 percent of negative players change their act and never
>> commit another offense after just one reported penalty."
>>
>> I have plenty of ideas how to apply this to Wikipedia, but I am sure Dario
>> and his team as well :) - and some opportunity for the communities to use
>> such results.

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